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Classic f/2.8 telephoto zoom lens with superb low-light performance and depth of field control.

A shining example of superior NIKKOR optical design, the AF Zoom-NIKKOR 80-200mm f/2.8D ED is a high-performance constant aperture telephoto zoom lens that produces brilliant photos and HD videos across its entire 80-200mm focal length range. Its ultra-fast f/2.8 maximum aperture delivers bright images with beautiful background blur (bokeh). It’s an excellent choice for serious sports, wildlife and portrait photographers, and it excels in low-light situations.
ED (Extra-Low Dispersion) Glass
A-M

Key Features

Brilliant low-light shots
Ultra-fast f/2.8 fixed aperture

At its widest aperture setting of f/2.8, the AF Zoom-NIKKOR 80-200mm f/2.8D ED delivers maximum light to your camera’s sensor. This means you can shoot at higher shutter speeds and still achieve bright, sharp images. And since you can open the aperture to f/2.8 throughout the entire zoom range, you can maintain a consistent exposure from any distance. Create brilliant images in exciting new low-light situations.
Beautiful background blur
Maximum depth-of-field control

The AF Zoom-NIKKOR 80-200mm f/2.8D ED offers superior depth-of-field control for giving your photos and HD videos a natural, soft background blur (bokeh). Separate your subject from the background, or draw focus to a specific area of your composition.  Nikon’s Extra-low Dispersion (ED) glass ensures superior sharpness, contrast and color correction, even at the lens’ maximum aperture setting.
ED (Extra-Low Dispersion) Glass
ED (Extra-Low Dispersion) Glass
An optical glass developed by Nikon that is used with normal optical glass in telephoto lenses to obtain optimum correction of chromatic aberrations.
A-M
A-M
A-M stands for Auto-Manual Mode. Thanks to a mechanism incorporated in the lens barrel, smooth focusing operation in Manual focus mode is realized in the same way as users have become accustomed to with conventional manual-focus lenses by adding an appropriate torque to the focus ring.
AF Zoom-Nikkor 80-200mm f/2.8D ED 4.8 5 61 61
Nikon's Legendary f2.8 Tele-Zoom I have used this lens on assignments around the world. It's been dropped, splashed with salt water, left in hot vehicles for hours on end, caked in sand, and no matter what I do with it, it continues to make extraordinary pictures every time out. It focuses nearly as fast as the 70-200 AFS, yet it is noticeably smaller and lighter, and best of all it costs one-third less! Yet its optical performance is absolutely unreal. Sharpness, contrast and colour fidelity are spectacular. Distortion is minimal, ghosts and flare are unheard-of. It's built like a tank. Several people have asked me why I don't upgrade to the 70-200 AFS with VR, but in all honesty I just don't see what I would gain. This lens does everything I ask of it and more. Wonderful lens that every photographer should have in their bag. August 6, 2010
Great alternative to 70-200 This lens has been fantastic for shooting horse shows, and for everything else as well. It's a little long for close up work but if you've got room to back up does fine for portraits. Always sharp, and very fast, it is a fine sub for the twice as expensive 70-200. It's heavy though, be sure and get a more elastic foam type strap for long outings to avoid neck chaff. Good for indoors especially w today's awesome high ISO sensors. Most indoor arenas can be shot at ISO 3200 or less at 2.8 without flash. July 30, 2010
A must have for any level of photographer When you see those photos off Getty images, professional basketball, football games, and concerts this lens makes that level of imaging. Doesn't matter rather you use it on a DX or FX camera, it produces sharp photo regardless. It's a waste of money I feel to even invest in the 50mm and up lenses, VS just getting this one. You get this lens, all you need is a nice wide angle to cover everything else and you're set. It's very heavy as it's metal, but at the same time, built to last. You get used to its heaviness after awhile actually. Plus the photos look so nice, with such excellent color rendition that you can take them straight off the camera without needing photo shop, for those that always want to tweak photos. In a lot of photography I've done, the black color seems to fall off at a point and I see a lot of distortion as a result. This lens has what seems zero color fall off, and all you need is minimal light to take great photos. It gathers the light so well, it's mind blowing. This is one of those lenses once you use it once, you'll want to take photos of everything with it. If you have portfolios built, you'll want to rebuild your whole image off this lens, it's that serious. It might be pricy, but good imaging does not come cheap, and if you do photography full time, this lens will be a reason you get repeat business. People just get hooked on the look once they see what they look like. Great for sports, portraits, or anything you want to take a photo of honestly, as it just keeps pumping out crystal clear images like nothing. When I look at a well lit photo off this lens, its literally like I'm looking through a window, no joke... May 6, 2015
Great bokeh, fantastic lens This lens is a go to lens in my bag, as a great landscape tool as well as street photography and even portraits and head shots. Very fast focus, one of my favorite Nikon products. November 18, 2014
Nikon Nikkor 80-200mm f/2.8D ED AF This will probably be one of the most desired zoom lenses Nikon ever.        Still continue to have a good demand and its share price, despite the innumerable quantity sold in each of its versions, is a reflection of the robustness and quality with which they were built.        Produced from 1987 to 2008, was sold in four models: *1 (1987-1992) 80-200mm Nikkor f / 2.8 ED AF - model push / pull with 3 ED elements. *2 (1992-1997) 80-200mm Nikkor f / 2.8 ED AF-D - going to be an objective of the series D (now has the distance information to the object focused for better light metering, now possible in 3D Matrix). Is also a push / pull with 3 ED elements in your building model. *3 (1997-2006) 80-200mm Nikkor f / 2.8 ED AF-D - also D series, this third model (review here) has won a string of tripod and went on to have two rings - one for adjusting focus and the other for focal length. As with previous models has three ED elements. *4 (2007-2008) 80-200mm Nikkor f / 2.8 ED-IF AF-S - D series, this latest model now has a system of internal focus IF. Its optical construction features 5 ED elements.        They all have in common the excellent optics and build quality.        The optical quality of this lens is excellent! Produces images with vivid colors, good contrast and very sharp. Certainly the three ED elements present in its construction contribute to such good results.        The blur is excellent, very smooth! Produces beautiful results in all situations is not necessary to use it only in larger apertures.        The level of construction, just pick up one of these lenses to feel its weight and robustness denouncing their quality. Very well built, made primarily of metal.        But it is important to pay attention to some details: this is not a sealed and resistant to dust and moisture objective! It takes some care to use it wherever you go. This objective suffers easily with condensation. Careful when exiting a hot environment and go to a cold environment with this objective!        It is also good to be careful with the focus ring, it seems that plastic is used internally to keep you stuck. This plastic can break the misuse. I've worn a used model that was being sold and the focus ring suffered this damage.        Only handle this objective is already a pleasure! While "big" and heavy is a comfortable lens to use. The two rings are well placed - the zoom ring is not "glued" to the camera body - which allows you to switch between them expeditiously.        DX used in this objective becomes a 120-300mm f / 2.8! A good range of distances and certainly more than enough for a multitude of situations. August 20, 2014
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AF Zoom-Nikkor 80-200mm f/2.8D ED
 
3 Answers

Will the AF Zoom-Nikkor 80-200mm f/2.8D ED lens work on the D50

Jan 30, 2012 by
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frank
Tracy, CA, USA
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3 years, 6 months ago by
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frank
Tracy, CA, USA
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Favorite Subject: Family & Friends
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Answer: 
I use that same combination and it works great. The D50 has a focusing motor built into the body, so it will drive this lens for AF. I have read some reviews saying that the D50 is not as snappy with AF on this lens as with other bodies, but I it seems plenty quick to me for shooting ballet and soccer.
Jul 10, 2012 by
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Anonymous
Kent, WA
Location : 
Kent, WA
Age: 45-54
Favorite Subject: Sports
Nikon Family: 6-10 years
Experience: More than a year
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist

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Answer: 
Your D50 has a focusing motor and will drive the AF 80-200. It's confusing because Nikon took the focusing motors out of some of the lower cost cameras after the D50 was introduced (D3000/5000 and others). See page 106 of the D50 owners manual.
Feb 10, 2012 by
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Mike
Chicago, IL, USA
Location : 
Chicago, IL, USA
Age: 55-65
Favorite Subject: Nature
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: More than 20 years
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist

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Answer: 
It will work but will not autofocus
Jan 30, 2012 by
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JoeR
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AF Zoom-Nikkor 80-200mm f/2.8D ED
 
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Hello. Which teleconverter can mount on the lens (the body is a d7000) for keep autofocus?

Apr 22, 2012 by
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Giuseppe
Italia
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3 years, 3 months ago by
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Giuseppe
Italia
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Favorite Subject: Portrait
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Answer: 
Didn't read your lens correctlt, sorry didn't realize you had the older AF lens. Nikon does not make a teleconverter for AF lenses.
Apr 23, 2012 by
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JoeR

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Answer: 
The chart posted is for AF-S lens. This lens is AF not AF-S.
Apr 23, 2012 by
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Giuseppe
Italia
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Answer: 
All Nikon teleconverters will autofocus with that lens.
Here is the compatability chart

http://www.nikonusa.com/en_INC/IMG/Assets/Common-Assets/Images/Teleconverter-Compatibility/en_US_Comp_chart.html
Apr 22, 2012 by
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JoeR
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AF Zoom-Nikkor 80-200mm f/2.8D ED
 
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will this lens work with the D90

Mar 22, 2011 by
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4 years, 4 months ago by
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Yes, Works Great! The D90 has a motor on the body that auto focuses the lens. Might be a tad slow at focus though.
Sep 14, 2011 by
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Anonymous

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Answer: 
Yes, this lens can be use with the D90, but AF-assist illumination is not available.
Mar 24, 2011 by
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NikonStaff
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AF Zoom-Nikkor 80-200mm f/2.8D ED
 
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is there a update to this lens such as Nikon prod # 1997

Mar 22, 2011 by
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BOB
SHIRLEY NEW YORK
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i was told that this lens was updated from 1986 to 1997 is that true?
4 years, 4 months ago by
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BOB
SHIRLEY NEW YORK
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Answer: 
Yes, it was updated from the push-pull type of mechanism to a two-ring function (one for the focal length, the other for focusing). This may seem rather unusual or perhaps even counter-intuitive, but it does work well. It's still a very good and sharp lens to have and use. I use mine (it's the second version that has the limiting switch, not a ring to limit the focusing range) and it's been a solid lens.
Jun 25, 2011 by
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NikonEd
San Francisco, CA
Location : 
San Francisco, CA
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Favorite Subject: Family & Friends
Nikon Family: 11-20 years
Experience: 1-3 months
Role: Semi-professional photographer

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Answer: 
Product # 1997 is a TC-20E Teleconverter, and no this lens has not been updated to a newer AF-S/ AI-S type. That is a popular request and it has been passed on to our product development group in the past.
Mar 24, 2011 by
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Anonymous
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AF Zoom-Nikkor 80-200mm f/2.8D ED
 
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Do you need a "working" limit/full switch in order to autofocus? I have seen a lens where this switch is missing.

Mar 31, 2011 by
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4 years, 4 months ago by
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dasman
Age: 45-54
Favorite Subject: Travel
Nikon Family: 21+ years
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It will still focus, but it depends upon which position the switch was in when it broke off. If it's on the "Limit" setting, it's going to be quite limited in the range that it will work within. You will notice that it will stop at a certain point and won't focus past that spot (either near or far, depending). If it's focusing throughout the entire range, then it broke off in the "Full" setting, which is good because you can at least still use the lens. You (or the current owner) should consider getting that replaced/repaired unless you/they really don't use/care about that particular function.
Jun 24, 2011 by
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NikonEd
San Francisco, CA
Location : 
San Francisco, CA
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Favorite Subject: Family & Friends
Nikon Family: 11-20 years
Experience: 1-3 months
Role: Semi-professional photographer

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Answer: 
This lens is AF that is way doesn’t have the switch for A or M (like AF-S models). It doesn’t have the Silent Wave Motor built-in in order to work with cameras bodies that don’t have built-in focus drive motor.
Mar 31, 2011 by
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NikonStaff
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4 years, 4 months ago by
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Answer: 
It will still focus, but it depends upon which position the switch was in when it broke off. If it's on the "Limit" setting, it's going to be quite limited in the range that it will work within. You will notice that it stops at a certain point and won't focus past that spot (either near or far, depending). If it's focusing throughout the entire range, then it broke off in the "Full" setting, which is good for you because you can at least still use the lens. Since you didn't specify what is happening with your particular lens, I can only speculate that it's broken off at the "Full" setting. You should consider getting that replaced/repaired unless you really don't use/care about that particular function.
Jun 24, 2011 by
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NikonEd
San Francisco, CA
Location : 
San Francisco, CA
Age: 35-44
Favorite Subject: Family & Friends
Nikon Family: 11-20 years
Experience: 1-3 months
Role: Semi-professional photographer

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Answer: 
We cannot guarantee the operation of this lens with the switch broken.
Apr 1, 2011 by
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NikonStaff
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AF Zoom-Nikkor 80-200mm f/2.8D ED
 
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What is the Function or Use of (limit / full) switch placed on lense AF Zoom-NIKKOR 80-200mm f/2.8D ED

Apr 5, 2011 by
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4 years, 3 months ago by
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MS
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limit/full switch is used to stop the automatic focus from moving too far. Sometimes you will notice that the lens is moving in and out a long distance to get the focus. If you use the limit/full swith in the "limit" position then the lens will not use the full focus range and this will save battery life. I generally leave it on "limit"

Hope is helps!!
Apr 14, 2011 by
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cellar1
Guelph, ON Canada

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The full/limit switch speeds autofocus by limiting the camera to "looking" for a subject in either longer ranges or closer ranges (depending on where you are focused when you set the limit). In the "Full" position the lens will hunt through the entire range when it needs to focus and this can take a long time.

If you are only shooting close (or far) subjects, use the "Limit"
Apr 6, 2011 by
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NikonStaff
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AF Zoom-Nikkor 80-200mm f/2.8D ED
 
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When will this Lense be avialble

Apr 25, 2011 by
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Weedy
SW Florida
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I am waiting to get a AF Zoom-NIKKOR 80-200mm f/2.8D ED, however they (being dealers) are all showing backorder from the mfg. Is there any kind of expected ship date to dealers? Thank you for your help.
4 years, 3 months ago by
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Weedy
SW Florida
Location : 
SW Florida
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Favorite Subject: Sports
Nikon Family: 2-5 years
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There is no easy answer to this question. It's all a matter of supply and demand. Have you checked with other online retailers/mail order houses? If you don't mind getting used equipment, you may also consider checking online bulletin boards to see who is selling their equipment at steep discounts (based upon its condition and amount of use, of course). You can also check with your local professional processing labs to see the For Sale postings if you really need one now.
Jun 24, 2011 by
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NikonEd
San Francisco, CA
Location : 
San Francisco, CA
Age: 35-44
Favorite Subject: Family & Friends
Nikon Family: 11-20 years
Experience: 1-3 months
Role: Semi-professional photographer

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other than being 3x expensive? :) nothing. but the 2.8ED AF-D is a beautiful lens, alas, i don't think nikon manufactures it anymore. what they are selling as new are probably leftover stock.
Apr 26, 2011 by
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AndrsK
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AF Zoom-Nikkor 80-200mm f/2.8D ED
 
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where is the serial number located on the 80-200 f2.8?

May 8, 2011 by
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dcv99
Colorado Springs
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4 years, 2 months ago by
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dcv99
Colorado Springs
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Colorado Springs
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Nikon Family: 21+ years
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Answer: 
The six-digit serial number can be found on the "bottom side" of the aperture ring. It is engraved on the surface and can be seen from an angle. If you are the original owner, you should immediately record the serial number from the registration card that came in the box. This will help you when you need to provide it to Nikon Professional
Services (NPS) or if you have to make an insurance claim (theft, damage, etc.).
Jun 24, 2011 by
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NikonEd
San Francisco, CA
Location : 
San Francisco, CA
Age: 35-44
Favorite Subject: Family & Friends
Nikon Family: 11-20 years
Experience: 1-3 months
Role: Semi-professional photographer

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Answer: 
Its on the end etched onto the aperture ring.
May 8, 2011 by
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KeithD
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AF Zoom-Nikkor 80-200mm f/2.8D ED
 
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will this work with my D3000?

May 29, 2011 by
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Anonymous
Florida
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4 years, 2 months ago by
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Anonymous
Florida
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The answer is yes and no. Yes, in that all supported functions on the D3000 will work; and, no because the autofocus function won't work with the AF Zoom Nikkor 80-200mm in place. This is because there is no motor to drive the autofocus mechanism in the lens barrel like there was with the earlier crop of autofocus cameras. The current DSLRs all use the SWM to drive the lens. I found this out when I tried it on my D3100 and nothing happened. After some research and inspection of the mounting ring on the body, I realized that there was no pinout that drove the zoom lens like there is on the F-series of bodies (from the F4 on up, and the N-series of autofocus cameras).
Jun 24, 2011 by
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NikonEd
San Francisco, CA
Location : 
San Francisco, CA
Age: 35-44
Favorite Subject: Family & Friends
Nikon Family: 11-20 years
Experience: 1-3 months
Role: Semi-professional photographer

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Answer: 
Yes it will work but it will be manual focus only.
May 29, 2011 by
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KeithD
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