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Rediscover the joy of photography.

Nikon Df product shot with the Special Edition lens
As digital camera technology has evolved, so has the way we control our cameras. Mechanical dials have given way to buttons, menu systems and LCD displays. But what if we could blend the elegant, simplistic control and styling of classic Nikon film cameras like the F, F3 and FM/FE series with the advanced technology of Nikon's exceptional new D-SLRs? Enter the Nikon Df, a thrilling FX-format D-SLR with a unique mechanical operation system and classic styling along with Nikon's flagship digital camera technology. A perfect blend of classic and modern, the Nikon Df offers a more personal shooting style that will inspire a new relationship with your camera—one you may have known and lost over the years—and reawaken your joy for taking photos.
Photo of a trumpeter dressed in costume shot with the Nikon Df

Beautiful photos, beautifully taken

Classic Nikon on the outside; digital Nikon on the inside

The Nikon Df is designed exclusively for taking still photos, enabling high reliability, advanced functions and elegant camera control in our thinnest, lightest FX-format D-SLR. Dedicated mechanical dials for shutter speed, ISO sensitivity, exposure compensation, exposure mode and release mode let you focus on what matters—achieving your creative vision. Capture stunningly sharp, detailed images with rich, faithful colors, even in low light. The perfectly coordinated AF-S NIKKOR 50mm f/1.8G Special Edition kit lens is an outstanding companion, providing the exceptional performance of NIKKOR optics and advanced Nikon lens technology. Its manual focusing ring features the knurling/hatching of classic manual lenses for precise focus adjustments.
Black and White photo of a man shot with the Nikon Df

A lifetime of great performance

Flagship image quality, versatility and reliability

Life is full of diverse (and often difficult) shooting situations. Many of the advancements in digital photography have enabled new levels of versatility—remarkable ISO sensitivity, breathtaking resolution, ultra-fast performance and more. The Nikon Df is no exception. Like our flagship D4, its 16.2MP FX-format image sensor is paired with EXPEED 3 image processing for an optimal balance of resolution, image quality and shooting speed. Its wide ISO range (100–12,800 expandable down to 50 and up to 204,800) lets you capture sharp low-light subjects with crisp edges, shadow areas that reflect proper, natural tonal gradation and highlights with rich, smooth gradation.
Nikon Df photo of a man in low light working on a barrel, inset with an athlete

Breathtaking results

Powerful advanced Nikon technologies

It's no surprise passionate photographers are passionate about Nikon—our engineers have invented and perfected some of the world's most important camera features. The Nikon Df continues that legacy of excellence and innovation. It incorporates our outstanding 39-point autofocus system with 9 highly accurate cross-type sensors that work all the way down to f/8. Achieve sharp focus no matter where you subject is within the frame at up to 5.5 frames per second. Quickly adjust white balance with our Spot White Balance feature. Create photos with dazzling dynamic range with built-in HDR and Active D-Lighting. Its rugged magnesium alloy body will withstand harsh conditions, and its 3.2-inch 921K-dot LCD display provides beautiful high-definition views of your shots.
Photo of the Nikon Df and legacy non-AI NIKKOR lenses

Compatibility beyond compare

Pair with current and past NIKKOR lenses, Speedlights and more

For over 80 years, NIKKOR lenses have been regarded as some of the finest optics available. In fact, photographers are still using NIKKOR lenses 30 or more years old! The Nikon Df wouldn't be a true classic camera if it couldn't work with those lenses, so we developed a mount system that works with all current AF-S, AF-D and AF NIKKOR lenses. Additionally, a metering coupling lever makes it possible to use both AI (Aperture Index) or non-AI lenses. Use i-TTL compatible Speedlights, the AR-3 threaded cable release, Nikon's new WR Remote System and even Nikon's exciting WU-1a Wireless Mobile Adapter for instant Wi-Fi photo sharing to your smartphone or tablet!
Nikon Df and WU-1a wireless mobile adapter

Instantly share your great photos

Attach the optional WU-1a Wireless Mobile Adapter and instantly share your beautiful photos. Connect to the Nikon Df with a compatible smartphone or tablet*, then use it to browse your camera's memory card, import your favorite photos and even see what your camera sees and fire the shutter!
Nikon Df photo of a track and field athlete inset with multiple shots showing 5.5 fps continuous shooting

Catch exactly the right moment

When photo-worthy action starts, hold down the shutter button and capture every movement, expression and feeling at 5.5 frames per second, even when shooting with the LCD display in Live View mode. Stop reaching for your smartphone when an important moment happens—except to share the great shot you just caught with the Nikon Df.
Nikon Df photo of a woman waving a colorful flag

Focus exactly where you want it

Whether you're using the viewfinder with its 100% frame coverage or the LCD display in Live View mode, the Nikon Df captures tack-sharp photos. Its 39-point autofocus system with 9 cross-type sensors quickly locks onto your subject, and Nikon's unique 3D-tracking uses the 2,016-pixel RGB sensor to recognize and follow it across the frame. When shooting with the LCD display in Live View mode, the Nikon Df uses fast contrast-detect AF, operating at the same speed as the flagship D4, and can display your composition at up to 19x for accurate focus confirmation—perfect for tripod shooting.
Low light photo of a man with barrels of alcohol shot with the Nikon Df

Pictures as your eyes see them

The Nikon Df features exceptional metering and onboard intelligence, freeing you to focus on the composition of your shots and, most importantly, the moment that's taking place. Nikon's outstanding Scene Recognition System analyzes your shooting situation, compares it to an onboard database of thousands of scenes and automatically determines the most appropriate exposure, white balance and autofocus settings as well as i-TTL flash exposure when using a Nikon Speedlight.
Nikon Df HDR photo of a cathedral

Embrace highlights and shadows

Built-in HDR automatically combines two photos into one highly dynamic image, and new subject-based Active D-Lighting automatically brightens shadowy areas on your subjects—great for portraits.
Nikon Df portrait of a man smiling at the camera, shot in black and white

Define your own style

The Nikon Df's easy to use Picture Controls let you alter your color palette and add a personal touch with six settings available; Standard, Neutral, Vivid, Monochrome, Portrait and Landscape—customize the look and feel of your photos.
Nikon Df photo of a boat on a rocky shoreline

Change your view of the world

The Nikon Df is compatible with so many past and present NIKKOR lenses, it's easy to expand your capabilities and creativity over time by growing your own collection.

WI-FI COMPATIBILITY

This camera's Wi-Fi® capability using the WU-1a Wireless Mobile Adapter can only be used with a compatible iPhone®, iPad®, and/or iPod touch® or smart devices running on the Android™ operating system. The Wireless Mobile Utility application must be installed on the device before it can be used with this camera.
For compatibility and to download the application, please visit:

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On the outside, it's classic Nikon—our thinnest, lightest FX-format body with an elegant mechanical operation system inspired by the legendary F, F3 and FM/FE series film cameras. On the inside, it's flagship Nikon D-SLR—the advanced 16.2-MP FX-format image sensor and EXPEED 3 processing engine from the D4, our ultra-fast 39-point AF system, an ultra-high resolution LCD display and even Wi-Fi® photo sharing (with optional adapter). Embrace a more personal shooting style that results in some of your most inspiring photos yet. /en_US/o/VlzcrU1p-TVWGNpBLq9lnLFBQ58/Misc/us_DF_logo.png true false /en_US/o/2nX4wJa95uuYVTA4puygd56ZOAM/Views/1526_DF.png <span style="font-size: small;"><strong>Classic feel. 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On the outside, it's classic Nikon—our thinnest, lightest FX-format body with an elegant mechanical operation system inspired by the legendary F, F3 and FM/FE series film cameras. On the inside, it's flagship Nikon D-SLR—the advanced 16.2-MP FX-format image sensor and EXPEED 3 processing engine from the D4, our ultra-fast 39-point AF system, an ultra-high resolution LCD display and even Wi-Fi® photo sharing (with optional adapter). Embrace a more personal shooting style that results in some of your most inspiring photos yet. product Nikon_DF-en_US Nikon_DF 1526 1525 DIGSLR $2,749.95 false $2,749.95 NONE false false false 2014-05-04T04:00:00Z /dslr-cameras/1526/Nikon-Df.html /dslr-cameras/Nikon-Df.html 1526 1526 en_US Nikon Df/en_INC/o/T86fAfABVCPVZad2cvBB9Kk6nbA/Views/DF_repview.png true /en_US/o/VlzcrU1p-TVWGNpBLq9lnLFBQ58/Misc/us_DF_logo.png Reignite your passion for photography with this thrilling blend of classic and modern. On the outside, it's classic Nikon—our thinnest, lightest FX-format body with an elegant mechanical operation system inspired by the legendary F, F3 and FM/FE series film cameras. On the inside, it's flagship Nikon D-SLR—the advanced 16.2-MP FX-format image sensor and EXPEED 3 processing engine from the D4, our ultra-fast 39-point AF system, an ultra-high resolution LCD display and even Wi-Fi® photo sharing (with optional adapter). Embrace a more personal shooting style that results in some of your most inspiring photos yet. <span style="font-size: small;"><strong>Classic feel. Modern Performance.<br />Rediscover the joy of photography.</strong></span> true 4.8 23 true CABLCOMP IMGSOFT RMTTRANS PWRPAC CAPCOV RMTCORD EYEPIE CAMCASE FLSH VIEWFNDR MISC WIRELESS PWRAPT BATTERY STRAPS PWRCHG GPS IMG-APPAREL 1526 1525 1528 1527 1528 1527 2 false false false 1526 false Product /WhereToBuy.page?pnbr=Nikon_DF 2.6586876 false false false false false AF-S NIKKOR 50mm f/1.8G Special Edition 2214 1527-en_US /en_US/o/VlzcrU1p-TVWGNpBLq9lnLFBQ58/Views/1527_DF.pngVariant $2,999.95 true false false true DIGSLR NONE true false 1527 /WhereToBuy.page?pnbr=1527 false false /dslr-cameras/1527/Nikon-Df.html Nikon Df - Black Special Edition Lens Kitfalse true 1527 hlixggca $2,999.95 Black /en_INC/IMG/Assets/Common-Assets/Icons-and-Logos/ColorSwatches/26197_black.gif 2999.95 2999.95 1527 KitVariant 1525 The Nikon Df with its dedicated mechanical dials for shutter speed, ISO sensitivity, exposure compensation, exposure mode and release mode let you focus on what matters—achieving your creative vision. The perfectly coordinated AF-S NIKKOR 50mm f/1.8G Special Edition kit lens is an outstanding companion, providing the exceptional performance of NIKKOR optics and advanced Nikon lens technology. Its manual focusing ring features the knurling/hatching of classic manual lenses for precise focus adjustments. 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Its manual focusing ring features the knurling/hatching of classic manual lenses for precise focus adjustments. Special Edition Lens Kit product hlixggca-en_US hlixggca 1528 1527 DIGSLR $2,999.95 $2,999.95 false $2,999.95 NONE false false false /dslr-cameras/1528/Nikon-Df.html /dslr-cameras/Nikon-Df.html 1528 en_US Special Edition Lens Kit/static/images/placeholder/products/default_front-en_US.png false The Nikon Df with its dedicated mechanical dials for shutter speed, ISO sensitivity, exposure compensation, exposure mode and release mode let you focus on what matters—achieving your creative vision. The perfectly coordinated AF-S NIKKOR 50mm f/1.8G Special Edition kit lens is an outstanding companion, providing the exceptional performance of NIKKOR optics and advanced Nikon lens technology. Its manual focusing ring features the knurling/hatching of classic manual lenses for precise focus adjustments. 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SilverBlack

Nikon Df Body Only

Price $2,749.95
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SilverBlack

Special Edition Lens Kit

Nikon Df - Silver Camera Body AF-S NIKKOR 50mm f/1.8G Special Edition
Price $2,999.95
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Nikon Df 4.8 5 23 23
Outstanding!! To help the reader assess whether the following opinions are of any value to them personally, I will begin with a little personal background, shooting style, equipment preferences, etc. First off, I am a passionate photography hobbyist, not a professional. Furthermore, I would only rate my skill level and talent as average at best. Of the thousands of photos I shoot over the course of a year, I can sincerely say that I am pleased with only a small percentage. For that small percentage that somehow magically transcend the reality of the moment, however, I find the pursuit of beauty and emotion through the lens of a camera to be immensely gratifying. My first camera as a teenager was a totally manual Pentax K1000 with two prime lenses: a 50mm f/2 and a 135mm f/2.8. As a kid who had to mow lawns and do other yard work to pay for film and processing for every exposed frame, I quickly learned to make every shot count. To this day, I still prefer to shoot manual (with the exception of auto ISO when not using off-camera flash/strobes) unless I am in rapidly changing lighting conditions. In this case, I shoot in aperture priority mode to prevent missing shots that would otherwise require too much time to manually adjust both shutter speed and aperture to remain within ISO limits. Also, I still shoot to make every shot count by carefully planning composition and lighting before releasing the shutter. Moreover, I still prefer to only shoot with primes. At this point in my journey, I am disciplining myself to get by with only two primes: a Nikkor 24mm f/2.8 and a Nikkor 105mm f/2. In a pinch, I may allow myself to grab my 50mm f/1.8 for lower light or a shallower DOF. Lastly, I thoroughly enjoy the creativity and challenge of working with manual off-camera flash. As for my shooting preferences, my favorite subjects includes nature, landscape, architecture, events, quirky details like an array of bolts on a bridge trellis, street scenes, and portraits. I am very active and mobile on foot, bicycle, and motorcycle and strongly prefer that my equipment not get in my way and restrict my mobility and thus restrict my photography. I want the flexibility of throwing my camera bag in my motorcycle top case, strapping a tripod to the seat and heading across town to catch some nighttime city skyline shots one day and the next day hiking a few miles to the top of a local mountain with a light stand, shoot-through umbrella and speedlight to shoot some portraits of family and friends. Of all the above personal preferences and style, I can unequivocally say that the Nikon Df has far exceeded my expectations and fulfilled my every desire in a camera. In fact, given my preference for mobility, I feel that the Df has liberated me to expand my photography even further. As an example, I just recently returned from a week in NYC during which my only transportation was subway and foot. Over the week, I traversed Manhattan and Brooklyn several times with my shoulder strap across my chest and my Df on my hip, oftentimes literally crushed by a mass of humanity on a packed subway. I would have never conceived of carrying my other camera, a D700, in such conditions. Comparatively, the D700 feels like a ponderous brick that I would have grown weary of toting within a day. Not so with the Df. If you can relate to any of the above preferences and styles, you may find the following impressions of the Df helpful: Image Quality: What can I say? It has the same sensor as the D4. The colors are deep and rich and the images have crazy detail. With these amateur eyes, I can't really discern a difference in image quality between my D700 until ISO exceeds 4,000. Above that, however, the Df smokes the D700. Actually, in my opinion, shots from the Df are quite usable even at ISO 12,800. To paraphrase another reviewer, taking a shot in a dimly lit room with the Df and then reviewing the shot in the LCD monitor makes it look like someone just turned the lights on. It is really that impressive. All I can say is that image quality and especially the low-light capabilities of the Df rocks. It is quite amazing. As for megapixels/resolution? I don't need more. I have no plans to print a billboard size photo. Actually, I prefer the lower file sizes due to lower storage requirements and lower processing demands on my Mac or Linux machines. Auto Focus: I don't typically shoot sporting events with erratically moving athletes or shoot rapidly moving wildlife, so I haven't pushed the Df to its continuous focus limits. For continuously focusing on a person walking across a room or a car approaching on a city street, I have found that the camera keeps up perfectly well, even with a 'D' type lens with a screw-drive type focusing mechanism. As for missing an auto-focus assist lamp, for any photo that I would consider taking with ambient-light only, I have had no focusing issues. The only time I have had an issue auto-focusing is when using off-camera flash in very dim conditions. In this case, I simply increase the ambient light until I can focus. No big deal in my opinion. Ergonomics: I'm a male with a small skeletal frame standing 5' 9.5” with a BMI of 20. The Df fits my frame and hands perfectly. If you have ham-sized hands, you may struggle. The camera is compact with a lot of controls crammed into very little real estate. Coming from a D700, I went through an adjustment period to become accustomed to operating the camera due to the drastically different layout. Most challenging for me was learning how to most effectively work the sub-comand dial with my right index finger while staying clear of the camera strap. The more I use the camera, though, the more comfortable I have become with it. Even with larger heavier lenses, a 105mm f/2 in this case, the camera feels perfectly balanced in my opinion, unlike the opinions of some other reviewers. Ergonomically, I can't say that I would recommend that anything be changed. Otherwise, it would compromise the size, weight and aesthetics that I find so appealing about the Df. Controls: I'll openly admit that all the dials and buttons on the Df delight me. When I interact with the physical world, I like to feel in control, or at least have the illusion that I am in more control. Yes, this is more psychological than practical. But it is the psychological motivation, after all, not the practical motivation, that inspires me to pick up this camera and want to carry it everywhere every day. I have not been this inspired and motivated since my K1000. The ISO and Exposure Compensation dials on the top left? Spot on. The Shutter Speed, Release Mode and Exposure Mode dials on the top right? Spot on. I have found all the dials easy and pleasing to use. They feel solid, have great tactile feedback and reassuring clicks. I'll stress, though, that I enjoy interacting with the physical world and especially enjoy operating machines. Besides photography, my next passion is operating sport motorcycles. Mastering the motor skills, dexterity, and lightning fast mental spacial computations required to operate a motorcycle smoothly, quickly, proficiently and safely are extremely rewarding for me. For some of the same reasons, I find operating the Df (just another machine) very rewarding. If on the other hand, you are the type of person who does not enjoy operating machines and are only motivated by the ends and not necessarily the means by which to reach the ends, perhaps the Df is not for you. Another analogy: if you think the journey is of lesser importance than the destination when traveling, then perhaps the Df is not for you. There is absolutely nothing wrong with that. Different strokes for different folks. Sundry Impressions: - I find the single batter and SD card slot compartment quite clever unlike some reviewers. The SD card feels less substantial than the Compact Flash card with the D700, but I'm getting used to it. At least my Mac has an SD slot rather than requiring a separate USB CF card reader on my Mac as with the D700. - There is no LCD protector as with the D700, or my prior D90. Instead, you'll need to purchase some polycarbonate film LCD screen protectors to stick on your LCD screen. Well worth the money since I already have some scratches on the polycarbonate protective film that would have otherwise been on my LCD. - My preferred carrying method is a shoulder strap across my chest with my camera near my right hip at the ready. When carrying like this, I find that I inadvertently rotate the metering selector dial. I never noticed this with my D700, but I was not nearly as mobile with my D700. - Live view: I hardly use it, but I am impressed with the artificial horizon feature for leveling the camera on a tripod. - Auto ISO: I like the additional option of allowing minimum ISO to be determined by lens focal length. I also like the additional option of decreasing or increasing minimum shutter speed by a stop or two to account for your hand steadiness on a given day. This is a bonus over the D700. - Battery life: As other reviewers have noted, it is phenomenal. A few days of relatively heavy shooting between charges. Of course my limited use of Live View extends battery life. - Aesthetics: The camera is beautiful. I can sit and marvel at its beauty just as I can marvel at the beauty of an MV Augusta or Ducati motorcycle. I'll not hesitate to admit that its beauty, along with its image quality, size and weight was a major factor in my purchase decision. If you have not deduced this by now, I am very pleased with my Nikon Df. Having dropped nearly three grand on a camera body, you may not think that I am frugal. In reality, though, I am very frugal. My wife would even present a strong argument that I am downright cheap. My frugality notwithstanding, I have not experienced one second of post-purchase regret after purchasing the Df. The more I use it, the more I enjoy it. August 19, 2014
Pretty near perfect The main reasons I got the Df is for image quality, low light capabilities and the looks of the camera. Other reasons that I like the Df. I just love the JPEGs that come out of the camera. The Df begs you to take photos. The camera is smaller and lighter than my D800E. Holding the Df is a pleasure and reminds me of the days of manual cameras. The build quality is great and feels solid in your hands when holding the camera. There is no popup flash on the Df which I really like. The shutter is quieter than my D800E. Basically this is my go to camera. Some of nits, which bug me, about the camera, 1) small LCD screen. If you have eyesight or reading problems the screen is just too small. 2) 1/4000 is the fastest shutter speed for a camera that cost this much, why? 3) I understand this is a retro camera, however it is digital right, video would have been nice. Not a show stopper, however, nice to have unless you are carrying another camera for video work. 4) The SD card is located near the battery. Why is not on the side like other Nikon Dxxx series camera's? Even with all this nits I still love the camera for some reason and why I gave it 5 stars. I like shooting with it more than my D800E. I have had the camera for nearly two months now. August 7, 2014
A pleasure to use... I have had a new Df for about three weeks and have put it through the paces. Overall, I am extremely pleased. Having all of your basic data (ISO, Shutter Speed, Compensation, Mode, etc.) visible at the same time on top of the camera makes this a real pleasure to use. Great weight. Great build. Great light sensitivity. I, too, would hope that any future version (if there is to be one) would have room for a second media card for overflow or simultaneous back-up. I could generally case less about video so am pleased that this camera is not cluttered with such features. Thanks, Nikon! August 1, 2014
The finest digital I have used. "Pure Photography" for sure. I had been waiting for some sort of retro style camera since going to digital. I always missed having the analog style design and I have always despised a built in flash. I just do. When I first got my Df I was happy to have the old style again, but discovered another purpose for this. When you look down to the top of the camera, it tells you everything without having to go through menus or look at a tiny LCD screen or push several buttons to see what you need to see. Exposure compensation, ISO, shooting mode, shutter speeds when in manual or Shutter mode, other details too when just looking down at the top. The camera is very, very light weight and the battery lasts forever. Use of the SD card is nice because it saves a few pennies on not having to buy more expensive CF cards. 16MP is plenty and delivers resolution that of the D4s. It's low light capability is incredible and has acceptable resolution up to ISO 6400, I have found, with the use of digital noise removal. The Df is a "traditional" photography person's camera, that's for sure, and missing the video. It was designed that way and I like it that way. That was the purpose of it's production, hence the commercial "Pure Photography", not Pure Photography and Video. Video is desired by some but not by all. In the production of this camera I'm glad they left it off. In my opinion newer DSLR cameras are packed with too much making them harder to learn for beginning photographers. Not the case for the Df. As a photography teacher I think it would be easier for students to learn on the Df than any other because of the lack of some features. Even though this is, the Df still does pack useable features. It's loaded; but easier. Only thing I would change about the Df would be to make it accepting and available a vertical grip with duel batteries and an SD card slot so you wouldn't have to take the grip off. Duel SD card slots would be nice too, and would give it a fatter grip making it more comfortable to hold. In addition move the strap lugs. When the strap is mounted it tends to get in the way when shooting with the index finger. Other than those things the Df is a perfect camera for the "traditional" shooter. I highly recommend this for anyone who is not looking for video and loves just shooting stills. Thank you Nikon for bringing back to life an old friend in digital. July 19, 2014
Its Perfect for my Passion The little camera that was born into so much negativity made me want to try it even more and once I finally did it was like it we were the perfect fit. I've owned a D2H, D2X, D200 and the D90 and D70. I still shoot with an old F2 and F100 and the Df is now in my bag with them as the perfect sibling. This camera is so easy to use, the dials are like second nature and I can work through my settings effortlessly. The image quality and prints are beautiful with colors that burst on their own. The old manual lenses are a dream to use and the quality of images is simply impeccable. I didn't think I could love a camera as much as I love the Df. Its not too big, not too small, in fact it fits perfectly in my hands and for what I do which is create photos through my passion and love of photography I dont thin I could ask for more. I believe anyone could use this camera for any type of photography. It may not be designed for the professional since Nikon has set it in the enthusiast category but it is capable of doing great things in the right hands and with the right eyes behind it! June 29, 2014
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Why would anybody buy this?

Nov 8, 2013 by
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clcerda
Chile
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16.2MP at the price of a D800 … just for the looks? Unless you are a very wealthy hobbyist, I can't see a reason for it …

For the looks I'd go for the FM-3 which is the real thing …

I'd humbly suggest Nikkon to improve system software, user interface and include wi-fi and gps in new cameras if we are talking about non photography core newer ideas … Nikon optics and camera specs are the best
9 months ago
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clcerda
Chile
Location : 
Chile
Age: 45-54
Favorite Subject: Landscape
Nikon Family: 11-20 years
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist
10 Answers

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Answer: 
Yes, I love the camera looks & features. I always own a Nikon cameras & I missed the classic looks. I own now a D3, D7000 & FM-3a & I am existed on replacing my D7000 for the improving features of the Df camera that has the similar classic looks of my old F3 that I loved. I like the weight of the new Df, it is lighter than my D3 & it is packed w/ updated modern features. I think Nikon got it right to bring back the legendary looks of Nikon design, together w/ modern features. The only thing I wish if it was a little bit less expensive. I am hoping also that the new Df camera has just a fast focusing as my D3.
Dec 25, 2013 by
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Toufic
Highland Park, NJ, USA
Location : 
Highland Park, NJ, USA
Age: 55-65
Favorite Subject: Sports
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Role: Semi-professional photographer

+10points
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Answer: 
Faster, lighter, sharper. Uses more lenses. Offers more control over basic functions without degrading performance. Extremely easy to use, short learning curve. Clean, clean, clean imaging. More than twice as good as the D7000. Ultimate direct control over photos.

Just about everything a photographer could ever hope for except for a second SD slot, 1/8,000 speed that most of us don't use, and a built in flash that can easily be done without or added on.

The big value item is the precision control you get. It is like no other camera.
Dec 11, 2013 by
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Kingsbarns
Olympia, WA, USA
Location : 
Olympia, WA, USA
Age: 55-65
Favorite Subject: Travel
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: 1-3 months
Role: Semi-professional photographer

+4points
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Answer: 
Because is very important to me shoot without flash in most of cases. The D4 sensor suppose to allow it.
On the other hand, I like the way you can control photo settings .
Dec 2, 2013 by
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Anonymous
Age: 45-54
Favorite Subject: Landscape
Nikon Family: 6-10 years
Experience: Less than a month
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist

+4points
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Answer: 
I'm seriously considering the Df because of the ergonomic navigation options involved, the light weight, size. I'm questioning the price, but I always do that. Camera's are too expensive whatever it is. I already have an F3HP, FA, and FM3a. I don't own a D-CAM, but the workflow issue is attractive
Nov 14, 2013 by
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Anonymous
Age: 55-65
Favorite Subject: Landscape
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Role: Semi-professional photographer

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Answer: 
To be able to shoot pictures the way we used to--where the photographer could make the camera do what he wanted. To have dials that are easy to turn to the setting you want, to have functions that work by feel, not looking at a menu and hoping you have chosen the right obscure pictogram. To control the output while taking the picture.
Nov 14, 2013 by
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Anonymous
Age: 45-54
Favorite Subject: Sports
Nikon Family: 21+ years

+27points
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Answer: 
This was designed for people like me, who are basically film photographers, and who asked for a stripped down but high performance full frame digital body. I don't need or want 36mp or video of any kind. I want full manual controls without having to dig through menus. I wan't exceptional low light performance (that's the only edge that digital really has over film). I don't mess around with post processing much if at all. I get the shot right when I am shooting it. I want it to work with the lenses I already own and for them to work the way I expect.
Nov 13, 2013 by
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Eli
Age: 35-44
Favorite Subject: Portrait
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: Less than a month
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist

+8points
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Answer: 
I would and am buying it because it is a tool that is optimized for a different mindset and way of working. I prefer 16mpx over 36mpx for what I do and it was a big deterrent of the D800 for me... While it may not have hit the 100% mark on specs this is much more to my liking with the high ISO performance of the D4, the light weight, and the perfect blend of the f series and the D series...
Nov 12, 2013 by
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Kyoshinikon
Los Angeles CA
Location : 
Los Angeles CA
Age: 18-24
Nikon Family: 6-10 years
Role: Semi-professional photographer

+10points
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Answer: 
The Df strikes me as being the long-awaited refresh of the D700 but with a decidedly analog twist.
Nov 11, 2013 by
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Scott
Bangor, Maine
Location : 
Bangor, Maine
Age: 55-65
Favorite Subject: Landscape
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: Less than a month
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist

+9points
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Answer: 
To step away from the over-whelming technology that drives the current marketplace is a refreshing change.

There are a lot of us who are doing this for art's sake and the latest whiz-bang toys quite frankly are a distraction from the real purpose of doing what we do.

I met a D-800 owner on the Rockland Lighthouse Breakwater recently. What was scary was that he was carrying at least $5K worth of camera and lens in his hand without benefit of at least a neck strap. One slip on the wet granite and it goes into the harbor.

The D-800 is state-of-the-art but in order to use it you may have to spend as much as the camera cost in new computer hardware and software just to handle the files properly. I have encountered a couple D-800 owners and they have confirmed this.

The Df reminds me of those Golden Age classics I used to sell back in the "70's. Timeless styling and function. Quite honestly I think 16MP is just about the right size for most work.
Nov 10, 2013 by
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Nikon Fan
Lagrange, ME, USA
Location : 
Lagrange, ME, USA
Age: 55-65
Favorite Subject: Landscape
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: Less than a month
Role: Semi-professional photographer

+17points
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Answer: 
This camera seems to be stepping away from the techogeek photographer, and snuggling up to the artist. There are distinct differences between the person hailing the technological, and the artist who just wants to get their vision across as well as possible. This camera seems aimed at the latter.
Nov 9, 2013 by
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Visually Ideal
Reno, NV, USA
Location : 
Reno, NV, USA
Age: 35-44
Favorite Subject: Portrait
Nikon Family: 0-1 years
Experience: Less than a month
Role: Professional photographer
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Nikon Df
 
4 Answers

any video mode?

Nov 5, 2013 by
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Anonymous
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9 months ago
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Anonymous
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+1point
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Answer: 
This is a straight up still camera
Dec 12, 2013 by
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Anonymous
Long Island
Location : 
Long Island
Age: 35-44
Favorite Subject: Portrait
Nikon Family: 6-10 years
Experience: Less than a month
Role: Semi-professional photographer

+1point
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Answer: 
This not the camera for anyone who cares about shooting live motion.
Dec 11, 2013 by
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Kingsbarns
Olympia, WA, USA
Location : 
Olympia, WA, USA
Age: 55-65
Favorite Subject: Travel
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: 1-3 months
Role: Semi-professional photographer

-5points
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Answer: 
Read The Specs.
Nov 5, 2013 by
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Anonymous

+8points
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Answer: 
No video.
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Nikon Df
 
3 Answers

Where is the DF manufactured?

Nov 5, 2013 by
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Anonymous
Canada
+2points
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9 months ago
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Anonymous
Canada
Location : 
Canada
Age: 18-24
Favorite Subject: Portrait
Nikon Family: 2-5 years
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+1point
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Answer: 
I thought that something would be done with the uploaded image. On the previous one the quality is so much worse then the original that one can't read what I am writing about. Here is hopefully the one that might pass the strip webproduction.
Sample Photos & Videos
User submitted photo
Jan 24, 2014 by
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MUR
Moscow, Russia
Location : 
Moscow, Russia
Age: 25-34
Favorite Subject: Travel
Nikon Family: 0-1 years
Experience: Less than a month
Role: Just getting started with photography

0points
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Answer: 
You ought to know that only Df body is produced in Japan as advertised. If you buy kit you find that the lens is produced in China. When I saw it I had checked photos of the camera online and nearly all of them had shown it the way you wouldn't see the bottom part of the lens.
Sample Photos & Videos
User submitted photo
Jan 23, 2014 by
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MUR
Moscow, Russia
Location : 
Moscow, Russia
Age: 25-34
Favorite Subject: Travel
Nikon Family: 0-1 years
Experience: Less than a month
Role: Just getting started with photography

+3points
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Answer: 
Japan - You can see this on the top left of the camera.
Nov 5, 2013 by
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Anonymous
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Nikon Df
 
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How do I change from single autofocus points to multiple autofocus?

Nov 28, 2013 by
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Anonymous
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8 months ago
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Anonymous
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Answer: 
As with other current Nikon dSLR cameras (D7100, D610), select the Autofocus Area Mode (Single-Point, 9-Point, 21-Point, 3D Tracking, etc) by pressing the AF-Mode Button (the button located inside the Focus-Mode Selector switch, near the base of the lens) and rotating the front Sub-Command Dial
Jan 5, 2014 by
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Anonymous

-1point
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Answer: 
When going to the custom settings of the shooting menu the number of focus points can be changed from 11 to 39 points.
Dec 20, 2013 by
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Nikon_Chelsea
New York
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Nikon Df
 
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Can you record just RAW, or does the JPEG always tag along?

Dec 16, 2013 by
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Anonymous
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8 months ago
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Anonymous
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Answer: 
With the Nikon Df, the image quality settings can be changed to shoot in only RAW or JPEG. Image quality settings can be seen on page 55 of the User's Manual:

https://support.nikonusa.com/app/an...
Dec 17, 2013 by
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Nikon_Chelsea
New York

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Answer: 
With the Nikon Df, the image quality settings can be changed to shoot in only RAW or JPEG. Image quality settings can be seen on page 55 of the User's Manual:

http://download3.nikonimglib.com/ar...
Dec 17, 2013 by
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Nikon_Chelsea
New York
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Are there two command dials, one for F-stop & one on the rear for shutter speed?

Jan 1, 2014 by
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Tad Craig Photos
Maui hi.
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7 months ago
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Tad Craig Photos
Maui hi.
Location : 
Maui hi.
Age: 45-54
Favorite Subject: Sports
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Role: Professional photographer
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Answer: 
Here is the diagram you want:
http://imaging.nikon.com/lineup/dslr/df/compatibility03.htm
Jan 3, 2014 by
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JoeR

+1point
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Answer: 
On the Nikon Df, there are multiple dials on the top of the camera where the shutter, ISO and exposure can be adjusted. There is also a rear command dial on the back of the camera for camera controls.
Jan 2, 2014 by
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Nikon_Chelsea
New York
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Nikon Df
 
2 Answers

Can I still switch to using the aperture ring on my non G lenses (i.e. Ai, Ai-S and D lenses)?

Nov 5, 2013 by
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Kodachromephotographer
Powell, WY
+2points
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I am a creature of habit and when Nikon made it so that option to switch from command dial to aperture ring on the lens, I got excited. Now to have dials back onto the camera on top to adjust the most important settings in photography (shutter speed, ASA (ISO) and mechanical release button) doesn't get any better. This new camera offers something other cameras don't and that is familiarity from film to digital without having to hunt around for the controls. I still use my FM2n and F5 on a regular basis along side my D200 and D300. Good move from Nikon. I know many will complain about price and loss of certain features...reality is that those extra are seldom used features.
9 months ago
by
Kodachromephotographer
Powell, WY
Location : 
Powell, WY
Age: 35-44
Favorite Subject: Portrait
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: Less than a month
Role: Professional photographer
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Answer: 
The short answer is "yes". If you use a 1st generation AF up to a "D" lens, you CAN lock the ring at the minimum aperture and use the control dial or you can manually rotate the aperture ring.

MF lenses that are AI/AI'ed/AIS will require you to rotate the aperture ring.

Only if you use a pre-AI lens (that was not converted) do you need to flip up that little tab. Of course, you are rotating the aperture ring.

The aperture display through the viewfinder will only differ from one of the cameras you listed, the FM2. Like almost every single model that followed the F4, there is no window that looks down on the aperture ring; you will receive the aperture reading via LED display just like all the other models you mentioned.
Nov 21, 2013 by
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Wm Gardner Photography
Central Wisconsin, USA
Location : 
Central Wisconsin, USA
Age: 35-44
Favorite Subject: Landscape
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Role: Professional photographer

0points
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Answer: 
To quote DP REVIEW:
"What the Df does allow you do, however, is specify a pre-Ai lens in the non-CPU lenses dialog, at which point you can flip the Ai tab out of the way, attach the lens then use the camera's command dial to select aperture (within the lens' aperture range) for metering, then physically set the aperture ring on the lens to the desired setting for exposure."
Nov 5, 2013 by
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JoeR
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Nikon Df
 
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When is this launching in India

Nov 5, 2013 by
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Chetan
India
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9 months ago
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Chetan
India
Location : 
India
Age: 25-34
Favorite Subject: Landscape
Nikon Family: 2-5 years
Experience: Less than a month
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist
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Answer: 
The Df shall be available from December 2013 onwards across pan India. Please visit Nikon India at http://www.nikon.co.in for more information.
Nov 18, 2013 by
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NikonCatherine
New York
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Nikon Df
 
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24.4Mp as listed on the opening page or 16.2Mp as listed on the product page?

Nov 5, 2013 by
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Buck Mills
Abingdon, MD 21009, USA
+1point
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9 months ago
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Buck Mills
Abingdon, MD 21009, USA
Location : 
Abingdon, MD 21009, USA
Age: 45-54
Favorite Subject: Landscape
Nikon Family: 6-10 years
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist
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Answer: 
16.2
Nov 5, 2013 by
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JoeR
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9 months ago
by
Anonymous
Puerto Rico
Location : 
Puerto Rico
Age: 55-65
Favorite Subject: Family & Friends
Nikon Family: 11-20 years
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist
1 answer

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-1point
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Answer: 
Nikon Df does not have video.
Nov 5, 2013 by
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JoeR
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