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12.4 Effective Megapixels: High Resolution 12.4 Effective Megapixel CMOS DX Sensor with fast 4-channel output for 4,288 x 2,848-pixel images.

Exposure Control: Programmed Auto with Flexible Program [P], Shutter-Priority Auto [S], Aperture-Priority Auto [A], Manual [M]; Exposure compensated in 5.0 EV range in 1/3, 1/2 or 1 EV steps; Auto Exposure bracketing; Number of shots: 2 to 9 frames Compensation steps: 1/3, 1/2, 2/3, or 1 EV steps; Continuous shooting mode: Provides an amazing 5 frames per second continuous shooting at full resolution, for 21 JPEG or 15 NEF images. Wireless: WT-2A Wi-Fi transmitter (optional) Wireless connectivity using 802.11g technology is possible through this accessory with full remote camera control using new Nikon Capture 4.2 software for unparalleled creative remote and unattended photography; Top shutter speed: 1/8,000 sec.

Compatible with the Coolwalker Digital Storage Photo Viewer: Store up to 10,000 digital photos on the 30GB hard drive and view them on the high-quality 2.5 inch TFT color monitor. Stores JPEG, TIFF and other major image file formats, including NEF files.

Flash: Nikon Creative Lighting System support for Nikon Speedlights SB-800, SB-600 for full i-TTL flash control with Nikon Advanced Wireless Lighting, color control, FP High-Speed Sync, Modeling flash and more!

In the Box - Supplied Accessories: Type-B Focusing Screen, Rechargeable Li-ion Battery EN-EL4, Quick Charger MH-21, Body Cap, Camera Strap AN-D2X, Audio Video Cable EG-D2, USB Cable UC-E4, LCD Monitor Cover BM-3, Battery Chamber Cover BL-1, PictureProject software CD-ROM; Supplied accessories may differ by country or region.

Memory Buffer: 17 Uncompressed NEF (RAW) and 22 Fine JPGs (LARGE)

Improved 3D Color Matrix Metering II with more refined exposure evaluation algorithms and larger database for difficult-to-meter scenes. TTL full-aperture exposure metering system: 1) D-/G-type Nikkor lenses support 3D-Color Matrix Metering II using the 1,005-pixel RGB sensor while other AF Nikkor lenses with built-in CPUs support Matrix Metering (Non-CPU lenses require manual input of lens data); 2) Center-Weighted Metering (75% of the meter's sensitivity concentrated on the 8mm dia. circle) given to 6,10 or 13mm dia. circle in center of frame, or weighting based on average of entire frame; 3) Spot Metering (3mm dia. circle, approx. 2% of entire frame); Metering position can be linked to the focus area when using Nikkor lenses with built-in CPU.

Compatible Lenses: AF Nikkor (including AF-S, DX, VR and D-/G-type): All functions possible; D-type Manual-Focus Nikkor: All functions except autofocus and some exposure modes available; AF Nikkor other than D-/G-type: All functions except 3D Color Matrix Metering II and 3D Multi-Sensor Balanced Fill-Flash possible; AI-P Nikkor: All functions except 3D Color Matrix Metering II, 3D Multi-Sensor Balanced Fill-Flash and AF possible; Non-CPU AI Nikkor: Usable in [A] or [M] mode with Matrix-Metering, Center-Weighted and Spot metering available. Indication of aperture number after user inputs the aperture f/stop and focal length f=mm by multi-selector operation. Electronic Rangefinder usable with maximum aperture of f/5.6 or faster.

Autofocus: Multi-CAM 2000 Autofocus system provides 11-area autofocus system with group dynamic AF, close-subject priority dynamic AF, close subject in a group priority dynamic AF and Lock-On(TM) for various methods of following the fastest action.

D2X 5 5 7 7
Great pro camera for little $$$ I was looking for a digital camera that would accept and work with all the great Nikon lenses I've accumulated over the past 40 years. I've used film in environments ranging from 120 deg. F and 95% humidity to -30 deg. F in, sandstorms, monsoons and from sea-level to 17,000 ft. I wanted a digital that would hold up like my F3 and F4 did. After reading hour upon hour of reviews and tests I boiled it down to what do I need vs. features that while very neat I may never use. Very well built and solid, this was Nikon's Flagship professional digital in '05. Size and lay out is similar to my F4 while weight is slightly less. Pros: it will accept and work with all my lenses. The menu is easy to read and controls are laid out in a manner that makes setting up quick even without a manual. I did download the manual on line and brought it up for reference just in case. It feels familiar, so no culture shock, the controls are where my fingers think they should be without having to look for them. Weight to me is a plus; I found I have more stability hand held with a longer lens if the camera is heavier. It balances well with the big zooms like the 80-200 f2.8. With Nikon's firmware version 2, Hi-2 on the iso setting allows up to 3200 plenty fast enough for my needs. Cons: Uses a more expensive compact flash card instead of an HDSC card. DX format so I have go to a shorter lens to get the same coverage as a 35mm on the F4, but a 300mm now has a 400mm + magnification so it's a trade off. When using older non-CPU lenses you need to set the minimum focal length and max aperture in the menu before they will be able to auto focus. Weight to some would be a con but take a hint from bass players get a wide comfortable strap, and sling it like a bandoleer, it lessens the strain on the neck, keeps the camera out of the way but close enough for easy access Overall I'm happy with my decision. I feel if I can't get a decent photo with 12mp, 16mp or more isn't going to help. Update 3 July 2013 Brief update. The more I use it the better I like it, after around 200 shots I'm beginning to get the hang of it and its idiosyncrasies. I found one older 28-70mm f2.8 lens that is always super sharp on my F4, has soft focus in AF mode on the D2x, it is sharp in manual though. This is the only lens I have that has this trouble so may be an anomaly in my particular lens. Not a big deal because I purchased a new 17-70MM f2.8 which is quieter, focuses faster and is sharp at all focal lengths. So problem solved. Note: I have yet to find a zoom in any focal length as sharp as a dedicated single focal length lens. With longer lenses I found AF mode to be very important. Either single area or group dynamic works best to eliminate "hunt" in low light or for subjects in "busy" areas such as birds in leafy trees. In dynamic area with things like slightly moving leaves it will try to correct focus on everything, not a good combination. July 3, 2013
A great Pro camera even at this day and age I owned 3 D1Xs last year or so. The reason I owned three, I LOVED the quality of the images came out of them. Very VERY sharp, vivid images, and I paid only $100 per camera in mint condition. However, battery life of D1X is the ONLY reason I sold them and upgraded to one D2X (for the price). D2X's battery life is superior... I mean, HUGE difference between the two models. D2X obviously a superior model overall, but I still think image quality was better in D1X cameras, even with %50 less mpix resolution. I am using D2X about 6 months now, from portrait work to macro photos... I am extremely happy with the results, I think I am just addicted to DX series Pro cameras, next one should be the D3X (way WAY far in the future due to its price right now). I am posting one sample taken with a Nikkor F1.8 50mm lens... which I use a lot for all kinds of photography. You should get D2X if you are into pro photography, and don't want to break your bank account. It does EVERYTHING that you need, and much more if you have experience using other tools with it ;) June 28, 2013
Splendid camera The Nikon D2x camera was the first serious digital camera I ever bought. Nikon waited a long time to produce the D2x and it was at the time and still is, an outstanding product. I also own the D3 and the D300s. I still love my D2x. I must say that, although the technical features of the most recent Nikon cameras are appealing and useful, the D2x has one quality that surpasses every other camera I have worked with: its color accuracy. Coming from the big slide 4x5 format world, I have found my D2x to render far superior true color images than its successor the D3 which has an annoying yellowish-magenta cast which has to be corrected in camera or with appropriate software. Regarding sharpness, the D2x in RAW mode can deliver extremely sharp images if tweaked a bit in post production and I mean it rivals my D3 without a doubt. I love the D2x ergonomics, the big grip, its small size which makes it perfect to take out, its speed to trigger the snapping shutter which gives you a very comforting feeling of action, all its buttons which are located exactly where your fingers are and the color rendition of its sensor. I would say that, if used in a controlled situation, like a studio with well set light strobes to shoot a portrait for instance, it will pretty much give you the color accuracy of a Kodak color reversal film for skin tones. This is a big statement, but I believe the D2x can live up to it. May 4, 2013
My baby, then, now and forever I bought my D2X 2 weeks before the D2xs was introduced, I still use it everyday as semi professional photographer. It has never skipped a beat, I love this camera, there is nothing I can say negative about this camera...except its not a D3s or D4...I have 160,000 clicks on my baby and it is perfect. I have literally shot just about everything with this camera, the first week I owned it, I shot a forest fire 1 mile from my home and a friends wedding the same week, with no time to learn the camera, it performed flawlessly. The quality of photo, resolution, ergonomics, color, speed...all is perfect for a 6-7 year old model. I can not afford a newer version of Nikon’s flagship at this point in time, when I can afford one , you can bet my D2X will forever be by my side as well, as is my other 6 Nikon cameras, beginning with the N65. I am a NIKON Freak, I am not afraid to admit that, and honestly, no amount of persuasion or monetary gain will ever change my Nikon love... June 2, 2012
Powerhouse My D2x is my all around camera and it gives my magnificent sharp detail, vibrant colors, and the right exposure. The experience using this camera is the best thing I can say in owning a D2x, the way the buttons and levers are placed, the great grip which is love the most, and also the power house design gives a great pride using it until today. I also own a D300s however my D2x will be here to stay as my main camera. August 20, 2011
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D2X
 
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Use with AF-D 80-200mm f2.8 zoom ... aperture not changing

Apr 9, 2014 by
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tgrudzin
Chicago, IL, USA
 on D2X
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Had an issues where this older style lens would not allow for the change of the aperture thru the aperture rings on a D2x. It there something wrong with the camera or lens? Lens ok on other camera body. Could I have set something wrong in the menu? Does the D2x have a factory re-set shortcut like later models?
2 months ago
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tgrudzin
Chicago, IL, USA
Location : 
Chicago, IL, USA
Age: 45-54
Favorite Subject: Portrait
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: More than 10 years
Role: Professional photographer
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Answer: 
Yup, this was my problem. Custom Setting Menu, option f6: Command dials. I had changed this for some un-know reason. It was an issue because I was always using DX lens. When I went to the "D" lens, well.
Apr 10, 2014 by
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tgrudzin

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Answer: 
Usually when using a lens with an aperture ring (D lens) on a digital SLR, its necessary to lock the aperture ring at the highest F number (smallest opening) and then control the aperture using the camera's command dials. The camera will display an fEE error if the aperture ring is any other setting. This is normal and does not indicate a problem with the camera or the lens.

If you are shooting in Aperture Priority (A) or Manual (M) modes, you can change the settings in the D2X to allow you to use the aperture ring to manage aperture. To do this, go to the Custom Setting Menu, navigate to the Controls section and select option f6: Command dials. Arrow down to Aperture Setting, then arrow to the right to see the options. Arrow down to choose Aperture ring, then arrow to the right to select OK and save your settings. Keep in mind that this change will only work if you are shooting in A or M modes. Other modes will still display an fEE error when the ring is not locked in place.
Apr 9, 2014 by
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NikonCatherine
New York

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The aperture is set by the camera body not the lens. The aperture ring should be set at F/22 and locked, this goes for all digital bodies, the aperture ring was for use on older film bodies without aperture control.
Apr 9, 2014 by
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KeithD
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2 years, 5 months ago by
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WayneJ
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Although the D300 is newer technology, the D2X is a professional model that was a Nikon flagship just 6 years ago, I own a D2X and feel you can not go wrong with the purchase of this camera. I have over 160,000 clicks on my shutter and this camera has NEVER been anything but perfect, in all aspects...
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Jun 2, 2012 by
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NikonBoy
Sedona, AZ, USA
Location : 
Sedona, AZ, USA
Age: 45-54
Favorite Subject: Portrait
Nikon Family: 11-20 years
Experience: More than a year
Role: Semi-professional photographer

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Since you are doing models and portfolios I assume lighting will not be a concern. With that said I would select the D2x. pro body, features are a switch away not in a menu, different shooting menus for common assignements, to name a few reasons. The camera fits in the hand much better that the D300, even with the extra battery housing attached. I believe a better shutter life is also expected. Alway try to get the shutter release information before you make an offer. Good luck.
Mar 13, 2012 by
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Anonymous
Age: 45-54
Favorite Subject: Sports
Nikon Family: 11-20 years
Experience: More than a year
Role: Semi-professional photographer
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D2X
 
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Is it a good slr to keep or should I get the d3200

Sep 4, 2013 by
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A jay
Ruislip, Greater London, UK
 on D2X
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Is it a good slr to keep or should I get the d3200
 
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9 months ago
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A jay
Ruislip, Greater London, UK
Location : 
Ruislip, Greater London, UK
Age: Under 18
Favorite Subject: Nature
Nikon Family: 6-10 years
Experience: Less than a month
Role: Semi-professional photographer
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If you do not have either of them yet, I would suggest you get the D7100 or something higher if you can afford it ,such as the D800, D-3 series, or the Mighty D4. If you already have the D2x, then getting a D3200 is a downgrade.
Sep 5, 2013 by
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Ben
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