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4.6 Rating
How-To Take Great Photos at the Aquarium

Tips for photographing the fish and creatures that live under water

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3.8 Rating
Hands On

Lindsay Silverman discusses autofocusing when using teleconverters

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4.4 Rating
Bokeh for Beginners

Have your subjects stand apart from the background with this easy technique

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4.3 Rating
Macro Lenses

Reproduce objects up to life size using a Nikon Micro-NIKKOR Lens

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Miles of Aisles

Kevin Kubota establishes his clients' comfort level before the wedding, so that on the big day they will…

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Subject Tracking

Subject Tracking enhances your shooting experience by automatically adjusting focus as it follows the…

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Zooming into a Scene with your Feet

Moose Peterson on using specific lenss for their angles of view

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5 Easy Composition Guidelines

Follow 5 easy tips for better photo compositions

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Taking Better Photographs on the Water

Harbors, bays, oceans and rivers all have one thing in common—interesting and…

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Ski Photography 101

Tips and tricks for getting great photos of skiers and snowboarders

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Summer Lyn: Photographing Babies, Toddlers & Kids

Careful planning or just being lucky—both can work in your favor.

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Photographing Sports Indoors and Out

Capturing the action of a sporting event is easy when you follow a few simple…

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Photographing People Using Wireless Lighting Techniques

Tom Bol's images inspire new ways of taking a portrait photo.

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Shooting the Effects of Global Warming

Gary Braasch follows the evidence; the power of photography does the rest.

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Rich Clarkson: The Right Place at the Right Time to Get the Shots

Rich Clarkson, an acclaimed photojournalist, who…

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Video Tutorial Series: Getting Started with your Nikon D3300 DSLR

Series of six videos to help you set-up and shoot and…

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Bright Idea: Adding Star Power
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Bright Idea: Adding Star Power

Creating a starburst in your photographs

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Basic Underwater Photography Tips

5 tips to taking better photos under the sea

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Marketplace: Step by Step

Taking it easy with the D3200

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Shooting the Full Moon with the COOLPIX P900

Using the Moon Scene Mode and 83x zoom of the COOLPIX P900

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Jim Richardson: Why Fast Lenses Make All the Difference

When You’re Constantly on the Move, Fast Glass Makes Tough Shots…

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One Shot: City Lights

Mark Alberhasky's silhouette of people against bright Times Square signage

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How to Photograph a Lunar Eclipse

Learn the techniques needed to shoot lunar eclipses from Mr. Eclipse, Fred Espenak

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Speedlight Tutorial: Bounce Technique

David Tejada uses Speedlights wirelessly for pleasing portrait illumination

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Benefits of Using the AF-ON Button for Autofocus

Three pros discuss using the AF-ON button for AF control

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How a Sports Illustrated Photographer Shoots his Kid's Games

What can a Sports Illustrated photographer teach you about…

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A New Sharp Shooter

Mike Corrado on shooting with the Nikon D810

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One Shot: After Image

Jack Dyking on seeing in color and thinking in B&W

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Joe McNally

Commercial photojournalist Joe McNally is a Nikon Ambassador. Learn more about his photography.

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How to Film Using Autofocus, Rack Focus and Manual Focus Techniques

Focusing tips for HDSLR video shooting

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4.5 Rating
Six Steps to Lighting Magic with Joe McNally

Follow lighting expert Joe McNally's instructions for easy flash photography…

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The Power and Beauty of Bears and Other Animals

When the animal in the viewfinder is a bear, this photographer knows…

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Photographing the Night Sky

Astrophotography: tips for making great images of the stars, moon and night sky time-lapse

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Taking Better Photographs of the American West

When you get a chance to visit the open prairies, and photograph ranchers…

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When to Use Graduated Neutral Density Filters

How to use a graduated neutral density filter to decrease extreme light to…

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Outside Shots: Go Long

Tony Sweet on revealing the invisible in images

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Using legacy NIKKOR lenses with the Nikon Df

The Nikon Df D-SLR is unique in that it can be used with many of the legacy NIKKOR lenses produced since 1959. The camera features an enhanced lens mount that works with current AF-S lenses as well as AF-D and AF lenses, and Ai (Aperture index) and Non-Ai lenses.

To determine if a lens is a Non-Ai, Ai, or more current model (AF, AF-D, AF-S), you need to look at the lens itself. You are looking for two distinctive properties of the lens.

A Non-Ai lens will have a meter coupling shoe without holes and it will be missing a meter coupling ridge.

Step 1. When to adjust the Meter Coupling Lever

When you want to use a Non-Ai lens on your Nikon Df, you will need to raise the meter coupling lever out of the way, on the camera body.

An Ai lens, on the other hand, will have a meter coupling shoe with holes and it will have a meter coupling ridge.

When you want to use an Ai lens or an AF, AF-D or AF-S lens on your Nikon Df, you will need to lower the meter coupling lever on the camera body, so it can be engaged by the lens.

Easy, right? Now onto Step 2.

Step 2. Entering non-CPU lens data

Because non-Ai lenses don’t have all the electronics built into them that are needed, to communicate with the Df regarding metering and exposure, you’ll need to provide the camera with some lens data, (lens focal length and maximum aperture), so you can shoot with it on the Df. This will allow you to gain access to a variety of CPU lens functions when using a non-CPU lens.

The camera can store lens data for up to nine non-CPU lenses.

First, attach the non-Ai lens to the camera, then go into the set-up menu and select Non-CPU lens data. Choose a lens # (one through nine), and enter the focal length and aperture. If the correct focal length is not listed, choose the closest one that is greater than that of the lens. Specify the exposure meter coupling method, Ai or non-Ai.

Then select either Aperture Priority or Manual exposure modes. These are the only exposure modes that will work with the type of lens attached.

If you want to use a specific aperture, use this order for the next two steps:

Adjust the aperture on the lens itself.

Lastly, use the exposure meter and turning the sub-command dial, set the correct exposure, matching the shutter speed to the aperture that you set on the lens.

If you don’t want a specific aperture, meter first.

Then, set the aperture on the lens itself to match the correct exposure.

Now you’re all set to go shooting!


Using an Ai lens on your Df

Because Ai lenses have the necessary hardware to communicate with the camera, all you need to do here make sure that you lowered the meter coupling lever on the camera body, and then attach the Ai lens to the camera, and you can start shooting.


Using an AF, AF-D or AF-S lens on your Df

Similarly, current AF, AF-D and AF-S lenses just need to have the meter coupling lever lowered. Once that’s done, you can mount the lens and shoot.

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