Nikon Americas USA

121ArticlesRemaining

4.9 Rating
Tamara Lackey

Lifestyle portrait photographer Tamara Lackey is a Nikon Ambassador. Learn more about her photography.

NEW
Read
Viewing
4.9 Rating
Brian Skerry: Below the Surface

An underwater photojournalist's stunning images

NEW
Read
Viewing
4.8 Rating
High Speed Sync: A Flash Technique To Add a Pro Touch to Your Photographs

Kevin Kubota on auto FP high speed sync flash…

Advanced

NEW
Read
Viewing
4.6 Rating
How-To Take Great Photos at the Aquarium

Tips for photographing the fish and creatures that live under water

Advanced

NEW
Read
Viewing
3.2 Rating
Action Control

Swing camera in the air to control settings.

NEW
Read
Viewing
5.0 Rating
A Nikon Ambassador's Photography in Cuba

Vincent Versace on photographing the culture and people of Cuba

NEW
Read
Viewing
4.4 Rating
Shooting Wirelessly with the Nikon WR-R10 and WR-T10 Wireless Remotes

Learn how easy it is to use the WR-R10/WR-T10 for…

NEW
Read
Viewing
3.8 Rating
CX Format Image Sensor

Nikon 1 digital cameras utilize the Nikon CX-format super high speed AF CMOS imaging sensor.

NEW
Read
Viewing
4.1 Rating
Nikon 1 Advanced Camera with Interchangeable Lens System

Revolutionary camera system designed for today’s picture taker.

NEW
Read
Viewing
4.8 Rating
Professional Video Camera Equipment for Your HDSLR

Using third-party rigs, rail systems and other accessories

NEW
Read
Viewing
3.0 Rating
Camera Tips: Using the My Menu Feature of your Nikon DSLR

Sara Wood explains how she uses the My Menu feature on Nikon…

Beginner

NEW
Read
Viewing
3.1 Rating
Using Your Nikon Camera's Built-in Wi-Fi

Step-by-step set-up guide to using the built-in Wi-Fi feature of Nikon cameras

NEW
Read
Viewing
4.5 Rating
A Photographic Expedition — Easter Island and Patagonia, Chile

Travel to Patagonia and Easter Island for a photographic…

NEW
Read
Viewing
4.1 Rating
Camera Support Tips for Shooting Steady Video

Five tips for steadying the camera when shooting video

NEW
Read
Viewing
4.7 Rating
3D Mode

Capture images in 3D for viewing on 3D compatible HDTVs and computers.

NEW
Read
Viewing
4.0 Rating
Getting Started: How to Hold Your D-SLR Camera

Getting sharper, more in-focus pictures can be as simple as learning how…

Beginner

NEW
Read
Viewing
3.5 Rating
Easy Panorama Mode

The Easy Panorama Mode combines multiple shots into a seamless 180- or 360-degree panoramic picture.

NEW
Read
Viewing
3.5 Rating
Have Fun Shooting Selfies (Self-Portrait) Photos

Tips and tricks for taking great Selfies

Beginner

NEW
Read
Viewing
4.5 Rating
The DX and FX Formats

Understand the differences between the formats to determine which is the one for you.

NEW
Read
Viewing
3.5 Rating
Understanding Nikon Wireless Connectivity

Learn how to connect your camera and compatible smart device wirelessly

NEW
Read
Viewing
4.0 Rating
Motion Detection

Motion Detection helps you take sharper pictures

NEW
Read
Viewing
4.4 Rating
HDSLR Video Tutorial: Getting Started with Your D-Movie Camera

Getting started with HDSLR video

NEW
Read
Viewing
0.0 Rating

Be the first to rate

Setting up the D4S/D4 and WT-5 for Networking: HTTP Mode or FTP Server

Video tutorial on setting up the D4S/D4 and WT-5…

Advanced

NEW
Read
Viewing
2.8 Rating
Scene Auto Selector

A COOLPIX feature that recognizes the type of scene or setting and automatically selects the…

NEW
Read
Viewing
3.0 Rating
Slow View

Slow View technology helps you capture an exact moment in time

NEW
Read
Viewing
4.2 Rating
Getting Started: How to Change a D-SLR Lens

Learn the steps to changing your camera's lens.

Beginner

NEW
Read
Viewing
3.9 Rating
Exposure Compensation When Using i-TTL Gets Easier with the D4/D4s

Exposure compensation and flash compensation can be…

NEW
Read
Viewing
4.0 Rating
Photograph Family and Friends During the Holidays

The holidays are prime picture-taking time. Get some great tips on…

Beginner

NEW
Read
Viewing
4.3 Rating
Shooting Wirelessly with Nikon’s WR-1 Wireless Remote Controller System

Learn how easy it is to shoot wirelessly with the…

NEW
Read
Viewing
3.2 Rating
Smart Portrait System

Nikon’s Smart Portrait System incorporates into COOLPIX cameras a series of automatic functions,…

NEW
Read
Viewing
5.0 Rating
Setting Up Your D4S or D4 DSLR for Networking with the WT-5

Video tutorial on setting up the D4S and WT-5A for wireless…

Advanced

NEW
Read
Viewing
3.0 Rating
Making Great COOLPIX Videos of a Child's Birthday Party

Tips & Tricks from photographer Ann Cutting

NEW
Read
Viewing
2.9 Rating
Built-in World Maps

Track where you've been shooting; locate Points of Interest.

NEW
Read
Viewing
3.9 Rating
Getting Creative with White Balance

Try getting creative with your camera's white balance for some interesting results.

NEW
Read
Viewing
3.8 Rating
Geotagging: Do More with your Images and Videos

GPS, Geolocation and Geotagging

NEW
Read
Viewing
3.9 Rating
Dedicated Time Release Movie Mode and Time Lapse Using the Built-in Interval Timer

Deciding which technique to use with…

Advanced

NEW
Read
Viewing
4.8 Rating
Speedlight Tutorial: Day to Night Technique

David Tejada uses Speedlights to create the illusion of a night scene

NEW
Read
Viewing
4.4 Rating
Flash Points: The Control of Light

Color temperature, rear sync, slow sync: Three key elements in flash photography.

Advanced

NEW
Read
Viewing
4.6 Rating
Marketplace: D7100 HD-SLR

The Nikon D7100 is a top-of-the-line performer

NEW
Read
Viewing
4.4 Rating
How to Photograph a Lunar Eclipse

Learn the techniques needed to shoot lunar eclipses from Mr. Eclipse, Fred Espenak

Advanced

NEW
Read
Viewing
Photo Editing with Nikon's Capture NX 2

Learn to use editing features of Capture NX 2 software to get the most from your…

NEW
Read
Viewing
4.2 Rating
Multi Story

In which smart gets smarter

NEW
Read
Viewing
4.1 Rating
Vibration Reduction

Vibration Reduction (VR) is an image stabilization technology that minimizes blur caused by camera…

NEW
Read
Viewing
4.5 Rating
Photography Lighting Tutorial Part 1 - Control of Color

Go on location with Joe McNally for a video tutorial on lighting…

Advanced

NEW
Read
Viewing
4.8 Rating
Repeating Flash Lighting Technique

Joe McNally uses the technique of repeating flash to capture the grace of balletic…

Advanced

NEW
Read
Viewing
4.6 Rating
How to Use Aperture and ND Filters to Control the Depth-of-Field in Movies

Depth-of-field for video

NEW
Read
Viewing
4.7 Rating
Take a New Look at an Everyday Object

Robin Layton discusses opening your eyes to looking at subjects differently

NEW
Read
Viewing
4.0 Rating
The Importance of Learning Photography Fundamentals

Bambi Cantrell on the importance of learning fundamentals

Beginner

NEW
Read
Viewing

Caring for your Nikon 1 AW1 Waterproof Camera

Before Use

Before using the Nikon 1 AW1 waterproof camera under water, it is important that you attach a 1 NIKKOR waterproof lens onto the camera. [At the time of writing this article, there are two waterproof 1 NIKKOR lenses, a 10mm and an 11.5-27.5mm lens.]

If you’ve been using the AW1 with a non-waterproof lens, or if you had the body cap on the camera, you’ll just need to inspect the O-ring before attaching the waterproof lens. Make sure there is no dirt or foreign matter on the O-ring; check that it is correctly positioned and it is not nicked or cracked. Also check the O-ring seal area of the lens to make sure there is no dust, dirt or foreign matter adhered to it. If so, clean it off.

Aligning the mounting mark on the body with the lens, carefully place the lens over the O-ring and press it into position, and then rotate the lens until it stops.

For use underwater, it is recommended that you remove the camera strap that came with the AW1 and instead use a third-party floating strap. Make sure that the battery is fully charged and inserted into the camera, and that a blank media card has also been placed in the card slot. Be careful as you’re closing the battery chamber door and the media card slot door to make sure that no foreign matter is adhering to the watertight channels. Clean any dirt with a blower or cotton swab. Make sure the latches and security locks are fully closed.

As a final check, immerse the camera with its waterproof lens attached in a sink or basin of water to make sure that you don’t see leaks. Turn the camera on and test the zoom ring and camera controls. Air may escape from the pressure-equalization vent and microphone and speaker covers, and that’s normal.

If however, you see air escaping from the lens mount or the connector and battery-chamber/media card slot covers, immediately remove the camera from the water and dry it thoroughly. Check to see that the O-ring and connector and battery chamber/media card slot covers are properly sealed. If you find the camera to be leaking during normal use, consult a Nikon-authorized service center.

If the camera passes the water submersion test, you’re ready to take it shooting under the sea or in a pool.

 

After Use

Nikon recommends cleaning the AW1 within 60 minutes of underwater use. Immerse the camera in fresh water, with its waterproof 1 NIKKOR lens attached to remove salt or other foreign matter. Leave the camera/lens submerged in a basin for about 10 minutes. Press the flash pop-up button, rotate the zoom ring if you’ve got that lens attached and operate the camera’s controls while in fresh water.

Wipe the camera dry. Using a soft, dry cloth, dry the camera and lens barrel.

Let the camera with lens still attached fully dry in a shady spot.

After confirming that no more water remains on the exterior of the Nikon 1 AW1 and its attached waterproof lens, slowly open the connector and battery chamber/media card slot covers and remove any water, sand or other foreign matter using a soft, dry cloth.

After you’ve confirmed that the lens and camera are dry, detach the lens and gently wipe the lens O-ring seal with a soft, dry cloth to remove any foreign matter. There may still be water between the camera and lens, so keep the camera flat and remove the lens slowly and carefully.

Using the soft, dry cloth, carefully clean the lens.

 

Maintenance

Proper care and maintenance of the Nikon 1 AW1’s O-ring is important to keep the waterproof integrity of the camera and attached waterproof 1 NIKKOR lens.

When performing routine checks and lubrication of the O-ring, you can remove it from the camera body either using your fingers or an optional O-ring remover. While holding the camera securely, lightly stretch the O-ring by sliding your fingers along either side and remove it from the camera.

Check the O-ring for nicks or cracks, and thoroughly wash it in fresh water, drying it thoroughly.

Do not use benzene, thinner, alcohol, soap, neutral detergents, or other cleaning products, as these could damage or weaken the O-ring!

Check the O-ring guide for foreign matter and use a blower or cotton swab to clean off any dirt. Be sure to remove any threads left behind from the cotton swab.

To grease the O-ring, use the silicon grease that came with the Nikon 1 AW1 or with the optional WP-G1000 silicon grease. Place a bead of the silicon grease in a plastic bag and use your fingers to spread the grease around inside the bag.

Do not use the lubricant that is used for COOLPIX or NIKONOS underwater camera’s O-rings!

Then insert the O-ring in the bag and massage the bag to fully coat the O-ring. This prevents wear on the O-ring and makes it easier to attach and remove the waterproof lenses from the Nikon 1 AW1.

After making sure that the O-ring and the guide are free of foreign matter, place the O-ring so that it runs evenly at the same level, all the way around the O-ring guide. The O-ring should not be overly stretched, nor should it protrude from the camera body.

 

Using the AW1 with a non-waterproof 1 NIKKOR lens

The Nikon 1 AW1 is a waterproof camera, when used with its waterproof lenses. You can also use the Nikon 1 AW1 with non-waterproof 1 NIKKOR lenses with the caveat that the camera will not be waterproof with a regular lens attached.

To use the Nikon 1 AW1 with a regular, non-waterproof 1 NIKKOR lens, you will have to protect the O-ring on the camera with the supplied O-ring protector.

The O-ring protector is supplied with the camera and should be kept on the body cap of the AW1 when it is not being used.