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Strategy Sessions

Doug Gordon on wedding photography

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What to do When you Need Stills while Shooting HD Video

Shoot simultaneously or save a frame options with the D4 or D4s…

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Speedlight Tutorial: Day to Night Technique

David Tejada uses Speedlights to create the illusion of a night scene

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Wired and Wireless File Transfer

Wired or wireless options lets you transfer image files from the camera to computer when…

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Taking Better Photographs on the Water

Harbors, bays, oceans and rivers all have one thing in common—interesting and…

Beginner

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Capture NX 2: Lesson 6

Discover how to make the colors in a landscape more vivid.

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How Can you Improve your Photography

Robin Layton discusses making images better

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New Directions: The D750 Inspires Creating, and Sharing, New Images

Lindsay Silverman shoots with the D750 DSLR

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Jim Richardson: Why Fast Lenses Make All the Difference

When You’re Constantly on the Move, Fast Glass Makes Tough Shots…

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Cat Photography: Capturing Cats in Pictures

With a little patience you too can make great pictures of your pet cat or…

Beginner

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Think About Your Subject Before You Begin Shooting

Find out why thinking about your photos can be as important as taking…

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Dedicated Time Release Movie Mode and Time Lapse Using the Built-in Interval Timer

Deciding which technique to use with…

Advanced

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Outdoor Pursuit

Bill Hatcher photographs the impossible—well, let's say the extremely difficult.

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John Shaw: A Photographer's Vision Simplified

See how one of the foremost nature, outdoor and natural history…

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Shooting Spectacular Sunrises and Sunsets

Jim Harmer’s tips for photographing at dawn and dusk

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Destination Asia: A Showcase for the Storytelling Power of Travel Images

Travel shooter Blaine Harrington offers tips for…

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Shooting Wirelessly with Nikon’s WR-1 Wireless Remote Controller System

Learn how easy it is to shoot wirelessly with the…

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4.7 Rating
Take a New Look at an Everyday Object

Robin Layton discusses opening your eyes to looking at subjects differently

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3D Focus Tracking

3D focus tracking automatically shifts the focus point to follow the movement of the subject. With the…

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Taking Pictures at Dusk and at Night

How do I take pictures at dusk and at night?

Advanced

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Photographing People Using Wireless Lighting Techniques

Tom Bol's images inspire new ways of taking a portrait photo.

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Halloween & Autumn Harvest Photography

Take better photos during the colorful fall season

Beginner

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Exposure Bracketing: The Creative Insurance Policy

Get creative with your photography by using this age-old technique.

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Taking Pictures of Fireworks

Learn how to get great fireworks shots this summer.

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Video Composition Rules: Establishing, Medium and Close-up Shots

Composition is how you choose to frame the video you're about to capture; and composition is just as important for video as it is for still photography.


Rule of Thirds

One of the most basic composition rules is the Rule of Thirds. When you look through at your subjects, using Live View on the LCD screen, imagine a tic-tac-toe grid over the scene. Notice where these lines intersect. The rule of thirds suggests that these intersection points are the ideal places to position your subject. Doing so will generally result in a pleasant and balanced composition. Try moving your camera so your subject appears where two of the lines meet. The subject doesn’t have to be directly on the intersection but somewhere close to it. Try a couple of different compositions to find the one you like best.


Establishing Shots, Medium Shots, Close-up Shots

When shooting video, you want to vary the types of shots for a more interesting feel. There are three types of shots that you’ll always see in videos and movies from big Hollywood productions to commercials and even wedding or occasion videos.

The Establishing shots are the wide shots. It allows the viewer to take in the entire scene and as an establishing shot is often the first shot in a scene.

Medium Shots can be of a subject (full length or cropped); or a medium shot can be a tighter shot of a scene, that doesn’t include all of the surroundings that a wide or establishing shot.

Close-up shots are tightly cropped shots showing fine detail. Close-up shots can be of a person’s face, an action occurring that is important to the storyline of your movie or simply a tightly cropped shot that shows details of an object.


Where to Crop or Frame a Shot of a Person

Similarly to still photography, you want to make sure when deciding where to crop for shots that show people, that you do it in a way that will make the final footage look pleasing to the eye. Cropping at major joints should be avoided.

For example, If you’re showing a person full length, you don’t want to accidentally crop them at the ankles. Likewise, for a medium shot, don’t crop a person at the knees. Frame your shot just above your subject’s knees. Lets go for a little bit tighter of a shot now, but don’t crop your subject at the wrist, as the viewer will be left wondering where their hands are. Lastly, when framing a tight close-up of a person, you can actually get away with cropping part of their head, so long as their eyes fall on the top line of your imaginary rule of thirds grid.


What is Headroom?

Headroom is the amount of space above your subject’s head in a frame. Too much space isn’t good, so make sure that you’re only leaving a small amount of airy space above your subject’s head.

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