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What Your Favorite Films Can Teach You About Making Films

Steve Heiner creates a short D-movie based on blockbusters that…

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Extreme Adventure

Adventure photographer Corey Rich goes to great lengths—and great heights— to get the shot.

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iPhone App

Nikon’s new iPhone app gives you anytime, anywhere access to Learn & Explore educational and editorial…

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Slow View

Slow View technology helps you capture an exact moment in time

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Camera Tips: Using the Multi Selector Center Button Controls

Customize your DSLR to to check focus in playback and more

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Scene Auto Selector

A COOLPIX feature that recognizes the type of scene or setting and automatically selects the…

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How to Film Using Autofocus, Rack Focus and Manual Focus Techniques

Focusing tips for HDSLR video shooting

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12 Tips for Better Vacation Photos

A dozen easy tips for taking better vacation pictures

Beginner

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Capture NX 2: Lesson 3

Find out how to remove specks of dust on an image, with naturally looking results.

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Capture NX 2: Lesson 10

Discover the time-saver of batch processing a group of your images.

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Live View Shooting Modes

Live View Shooting Mode enables you to view and compose the shot without looking through the…

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VR Image Stabilization

VR image stabilization technology detects vertical and horizontal movement and offsets it by…

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Cat Photography: Capturing Cats in Pictures

With a little patience you too can make great pictures of your pet cat or…

Beginner

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Be Prepared for All Situations

Andrew Hancock on always being prepared

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Setting up the D4S/D4 and WT-5 for Networking: HTTP Mode or FTP Server

Video tutorial on setting up the D4S/D4 and WT-5…

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Wired and Wireless File Transfer

Wired or wireless options lets you transfer image files from the camera to computer when…

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Nikon 1 Advanced Camera with Interchangeable Lens System

Revolutionary camera system designed for today’s picture taker.

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Shooting in Inclement Weather

Corey Rich discusses shooting in bad weather

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Knowing a Sport Before Shooting

Dave Black on knowing a sport's timing before going to shoot it

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Using Variable Neutral Density Filters to Adjust Exposure in DSLR Video

Adjusting exposure with Variable ND filters

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Setting Up Your D4S or D4 DSLR for Networking with the WT-5

Video tutorial on setting up the D4S and WT-5A for wireless…

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Caring for your Nikon 1 Waterproof Housing

Regular maintenence and care of the WP-N1/WP-N2/WP-N3 will ensure its…

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The Versatile Appeal of the D600

See what makes the D600 an appealing camera

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Following Your Heart for Great Images

Robin Layton discusses making great images

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Moving Pictures: The Learning Curve

Starting at stills, going to video

I’ve always had a film sensibility, and when I take still images I look through the viewfinder as if I were a cinematographer. That style fit with my early career as a photojournalist when I’d shoot all the way into an assignment—establishing shot, medium shot, then close to the subject—to tell a story and document an event. And I felt right at home when I began making videos with my Nikon D-SLRs.

In a picture story, the still image is the building block; in a video, the scene is the building block, and when you make a video clip, you quickly learn how to use scenes as if they were individual photographs. The best part of the narrative nature of a video is that you can assemble all those scenes and present them in the precise order you choose.

When I started shooting moving pictures, I realized that the assembly of a video is much the same as a collection of pictures: there’s a shot that establishes a mood, a place and a time, and as the scenes progress they generally get more and more detailed and descriptive as they lead viewers into the narrative. But when you’re shooting the establishing shot, the medium view and the close-up in a video there are decisions that don’t come into play when you’re shooting stills—decisions you need to make in the planning stage, in the storyboarding (if you choose to do that step), on the spot or in the editing. When you move from establishing shot to middle distance, will you stop shooting and do a cut when you edit, or will you shoot the move? If the latter, where will the camera be, and what will it be capturing? Perhaps something that will play a part in the story? A still photograph is a moment in time; video is all the moments, and I like to plan those moments ahead of time, though sometimes, on the spot, I’ll film more than I’d planned just in case I decide to use it later.

Another point on the learning curve from stills to video: if you’re recording someone talking in a documentary context, you might want to plan for B-roll material—that is, footage that adds to or supports what the interview subject is saying—so you’ll have a cutaway to break up the narration.

Establishing, medium distance and close-up still-image storytelling from our Workshop columnist, Michael Clark. If Michael had been shooting video instead of stills, would he have kept shooting as he circled around and moved in?

When I began to shoot video it took me a while to learn to keep the camera rolling. As a photojournalist, I’d shoot the pictures and move on; in video, it’s necessary to roll for a few seconds before you expect something to happen and then roll long after. Once I started to edit I learned what I needed to make the edits work—and that was longer takes into and out of a scene.

I also realized that when I shoot stills I tend to comment and sometimes instruct, and I couldn’t do that with video unless it was somehow part of the story. Video means not only everything you see, but everything you say. Plan ahead and instruct ahead, and realize that sound, both intended, incidental and accidental, is vital in video making.

So is editing, which seemed so daunting at first. I found that though the terminology and the software are completely different, I was dealing with digital files, putting them into a computer and manipulating them, and that turned out to be not so different than what I was doing with still photos.

After a bit of time experimenting and practicing, of going out and shooting short clips of things that were of interest, the video process started to come as naturally as taking stills. It was a different thought process, though, and there was a different feeling to the result—more compelling, more lyrical, more informative.

If you’re thinking of giving video a shot (or a scene), I’d suggest you start with what interests you most—air show, car show, garden club, vacation, do-it-yourself project—and tell the story from lots of angles, with detail shots and reactions. Or shoot your hobby in a way that shows why you love it, make a minute-long video and share it online. I think you’ll find, as I did, that it won’t take long to get ahead of the learning curve.

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