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3.9 Rating
Making Pictures in the Rain

Just because it's raining doesn't mean there aren't great pictures waiting to be made.

Beginner

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4.9 Rating
Think About Your Subject Before You Begin Shooting

Find out why thinking about your photos can be as important as taking…

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Bright Idea: Adding Star Power
4.4 Rating
Bright Idea: Adding Star Power

Creating a starburst in your photographs

Beginner

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3.9 Rating
Getting Creative with White Balance

Try getting creative with your camera's white balance for some interesting results.

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4.8 Rating
Caring for your Nikon 1 Waterproof Housing

Regular maintenence and care of the WP-N1/WP-N2/WP-N3 will ensure its…

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4.4 Rating
Destination Latin America:

Blaine Harrington on photographing Latin America

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4.4 Rating
Marketplace: One and Only

Nikon 1 AW1 waterproof, shockproof interchangeable lens camera

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4.4 Rating
Versatile Views of the World of Wildlife:

Ron Magill field tests the AF-S NIKKOR 80-400mm f/4.5-5.6G ED VR lens

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4.6 Rating
Techniques: Flower Power

Focus Stacking for Close-Up Depth and Detail

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5.0 Rating
Thomas D. Mangelsen Understands the Behavior of the Animals he Photographs

Photography is about much more than taking…

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4.3 Rating
How to Photograph Lightning

Storm chaser Jim Reed offers valuable tips for making photos of lighning while staying safe.

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4.1 Rating
Take Control of Color using Picture Controls

Diana Robinson gets the color she wants with Picture Controls in-camera and…

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Making Pictures in the Rain

There are perfectly good reasons why people don't like to take pictures when it's raining. It's messy; you have to work to keep yourself and your equipment dry. But, with a little planning and the right gear, it can be well worth the effort.

Probably the best tool for working in the rain is a good roof. Look for picnic shelters at parks, porches with overhangs, anything that lets you be outside without getting wet. Or, get an umbrella. Look for size and strength. Small ones are easy to carry, but large ones withstand more wind and rain. Perhaps the best compromise is a collapsible golf umbrella; large coverage in a reasonably compact size. Now it's time to talk about the kinds of photos you can make.

The light will usually be flat, so forget about bright colors. You'll be working with a muted palette, which can be a nice change of pace. Rain can give you images that have a dreamy, soft look to them, but that doesn't mean there's no color. Greens in particular can look lush and beautiful when wet. If you want more contrast, or "punch" in a scene, try the Vivid Picture Control setting (found in the Shooting Menu options on your Nikon digital camera). That will add some contrast and saturation.

Once you've taken the time to go shoot in the rain, you'll discover that a whole new world of images is waiting for you.

Raindrops also make great subjects. There are a couple of keys to shooting them. For one thing, they both pass and reflect light, so they photograph best against a dark or colorful background. One easy way to shoot them is from inside your house, focusing on the ones on the window glass. If you have a telephoto, you may find that it makes them look larger at closest focus than a normal or wide-angle lens. A macro or micro lens is designed for close focus and will allow you to get much, much closer. If you have a compact (point-and-shoot) camera, then turn on its close-focus capability (usually with a button on the back that has a flower icon). You can also shoot raindrops on car windows, or even through the wet glass, for an interesting look, but please, park the car first!

And keep an eye out for other people in the rain. Having a person in the picture can make it more interesting. People with umbrellas or people with animals can add to the quiet mood of a rainy photo and create an instant focal point to draw the viewer's attention.

Once you've taken the time to go shoot in the rain, you'll discover that a whole new world of images is waiting for you.

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