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Key Features

Dramatically reduces reflections from water and glass as well as rendering blue skies darker.
Polarizing filters reduce glare from non-metallic surfaces such as glass and water, as well as darkening blue skies.
These filters do not affect autofocus or auto exposure operation.
Designed for use with telephoto lenses that feature a slip-in filter holder.
Simply turn the rotating ring on the holder to find the most effective position.
Both the C-PL1L and C-PL3L feature a diameter of 52 mm.
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52mm Slip-in Circular Polarizing Filter C-PL1L
 
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Why is this listed as compatible with all these INcompatible lenses?

May 25, 2011 by
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Based on this website's information I bought the drop-in filter hoping to use it with my Nikon 500mm f/4. It does not fit at all - the curvature is obviously for a smaller diameter lens. I've since tried to slip it into the 200-400mm and the 600mm f/4 but it doesn't work in those either. Please update the "compatible with" links to correctly identify the lenses into which this fits.
3 years ago
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Anonymous
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Answer: 
Please see page# 16 of the user's manual for your lens. The 52mm filter is the correct one; just make sure that is installed properly:
http://www.nikonusa.com/pdf/manuals...
May 26, 2011 by
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NikonStaff
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52mm Slip-in Circular Polarizing Filter C-PL1L
 
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does the filter have to be lifted up to change the direction of the circle?

Apr 13, 2012 by
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52 MM polarizing filter
2 years, 1 month ago
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Anonymous
Age: Over 65
Favorite Subject: Nature
Nikon Family: 11-20 years
Experience: More than a year
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist
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Answer: 
No, lens rotates.
Apr 14, 2012 by
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JoeR
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52mm Slip-in Circular Polarizing Filter C-PL1L
 
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What's the difference between the C-PL1L and C-PL3L

Sep 14, 2012 by
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Anonymous
West Berkshire, UK
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Both have the same diameter and look identical from product photos. The 3L version is listed to be the one for the 200mm f/2.0 so what's the 1L version for? There's no information explaining why there are two models and what the differences are.
1 year, 8 months ago
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Anonymous
West Berkshire, UK
Location : 
West Berkshire, UK
Age: 25-34
Nikon Family: 6-10 years
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Answer: 
1L Is for 300VR, difference is the lenses have different barrel depths.
Sep 14, 2012 by
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JoeR
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52mm Slip-in Circular Polarizing Filter C-PL1L
 
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No Loss of Stops with Nikon Drop-in 52mm Lens

Aug 7, 2013 by
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I have a Nikon Circular Polarizing Slip-In (C-PL1L) 52mm (Prod. # 2474). I just tried it out in the 500 f/4 and found that it had no effect on the f/4 starting aperture. Usually, with regular lenses (WA or Tele's.) you lose 1 - 2 stops of light when you add a CPF. Can it be true that you lose no stops with this Nikon drop-in lens in the 500 f/4?
10 months ago
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Anonymous
New Jersey
Location : 
New Jersey
Age: Over 65
Favorite Subject: Nature
Nikon Family: 2-5 years
Experience: 1-3 months
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist
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Answer: 
You generally lose between 1 and 2 stops of light but the loss is compensated for by the camera.
Aug 24, 2013 by
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NikonLaurence
New York
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