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A full-frame Nikon for your full-time passion.

If you've been looking to take your passion to the next level with full-frame HD-SLR performance, your wait is over. Now the power of a pro-level Nikon FX-format camera—stunning full-frame images, cinema-quality 1080p videos, superior low-light performance, blazing fast framing and burst rates, built-in HDR, wireless photo sharing and much more—is attainable in a compact, lightweight HD-SLR. Optimized for full-frame shooting and versatility, streamlined for compactness and value, the D600 will fuel your passion like never before.
photo of a woman in a long red dress shot indoors

FX-quality images and HD videos

Nikon’s most compact full-frame HD-SLR ever

Passionate photographers who seek exceptional full-frame, high-resolution performance rely on Nikon FX-format HD-SLRs. For the first time ever, that level of performance is available in a compact, affordable HD-SLR. D600's 24.3 megapixel FX-format CMOS sensor captures every detail with lifelike sharpness. Its EXPEED 3 processing system manages all that data with remarkable speed and accuracy, enabling up to 5.5 frames-per-second (fps) continuous shooting at full resolution. And the low-light performance synonymous with Nikon is again proven deserved—shoot crystal clear images from ISO 100 to 6400, expandable down to 50 and up to 25,600 for extreme situations.
photo of a man selling nuts at a market, and a closeup view of nuts

The beauty is in the details

Highly accurate AF System for superior sharpness

One of the keys to capturing razor-sharp images and HD videos—whether shooting through the viewfinder or with the LCD monitor—is a fast, precise autofocus system, and the D600 has one of the best. 39 focus points with wide-area AF coverage offer endless compositional possibilities. Nine cross-type sensors and seven center focus points work all the way down to f/8 for extended AF functionality with teleconverters and long-reach lenses. When shooting photos or HD video in Live View, Nikon’s responsive contrast-detect AF activates for accurate fulltime autofocusing. Every moment you capture will be razor sharp.
photo of a city at night, in low light

Unwavering exceptional performance

Flawless metering and onboard intelligence

The D600 delivers consistently beautiful images and HD videos, thanks to Nikon’s intelligent Scene Recognition System with 3D Color Matrix Metering II. Its 2,016 pixel RGB sensor evaluates every scene, taking into account brightness, contrast, subject distance and the scene colors, all within the time it takes to press the shutter release button. That data is then referenced against an onboard image database for consistently accurate exposures, auto white balance, i-TTL flash and subject-tracking autofocus performance.
 
     

Cinema-quality HD video projects

Pro-level 1080p HD video recording features

Nikon is committed to developing HD-SLRs that empower and inspire filmmakers and video enthusiasts, and the D600 is proof of that commitment. Shoot 1080p HD videos with selectable frame rates of 30p, 25p or 24p and MPEG-4 AVC/H.264 compression. Bend time with 720p HD at 60p, 50p or 30p for ultra-smooth video playback of fast moving subjects, or create slow-motion footage during post processing. Maintain your creative vision with manual exposure control, fulltime AF with face-priority and subject tracking, dedicated inputs for a stereo mic and headphones, saving a selected still frame from video, and much more. Enhance all that with the dramatic perspectives and depth-of-field control of NIKKOR interchangeable lenses, and you'll dazzle with every video project.

photo of a photographer looking into the viewfinder of the D600 while a model sits in a scene, along with the shot of the model on a smartphone

Wi-Fi camera control and mobile photo sharing

Optional WU-1b wireless mobile adapter

With Wi-Fi compatibility, the D600 makes sharing photos even easier. Connect the optional WU-1b Wireless Adapter and wirelessly transfer photos to your smartphone, tablet or any compatible Wi-Fi enabled device. Use your smartphone to instantly upload your shots to the web or email them to a friend. Install Nikon's free Wireless Mobile Adapter Utility and remotely control the D600—see what the camera sees from your smartphone or tablet and fire off shots!
two photos of a woman against a rust covered wall, one looking at the camera, one with her eyes closed

Lighting studio optional

The D600’s built-in pop-up flash opens up new shooting possibilities—and not just in low-light situations. Even well lit subjects can benefit from a balanced fill flash for extra depth and dimension. And since the D600’s flash integrates with Nikon’s i-TTL system, it can act as a Commander and communicate crucial exposure information to two groups of remote flashes across three channels for accurate lighting and exceptional results.

A hobby that grows with you

Nikon’s HD-SLR system is endlessly expandable. From legendary NIKKOR lenses and Nikon Speedlights for endless creative expression to the WU-1b Wireless Adapter for Wi-Fi sharing and camera control, your system can grow with you.


WI-FI COMPATIBILITY

This camera's Wi-Fi® capability using the WU-1b Wireless Mobile Adapter can only be used with a compatible iPhone®, iPad®, and/or iPod touch® or smart devices running on the Android™ operating system. The Wireless Mobile Utility application must be installed on the device before it can be used with this camera.
For compatibility and to download the application, please visit:

D600 Body Only

Price $2,099.95
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24-85mm VR Lens Kit

D600 Camera BodyAF-S NIKKOR 24-85mm f/3.5-4.5G ED VR
Price $2,699.95
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Two Lens Kit

D600 Camera BodyAF-S NIKKOR 24-85mm f/3.5-4.5G ED VRAF-S VR Zoom-Nikkor 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6G IF-ED
Price $3,349.95
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Speedlights/Flashes
Speedlights/Flashes
Stereo Microphone
Stereo Microphone
NIKKOR Lenses
NIKKOR Lenses
Optimized for FX Format but compatible with extensive range of NIKKOR lenses.
D600 3.4 5 223 223
Small and Smart Small, smart, ergonomically and usefull FF. I so Like This. Thank You Nikon. March 27, 2014
D600 - I got mine just before this past Christmas, purchasing the last new in-stock unit at my local Best Buy saving about $600 which I took and spent on a new 70-300 VR as well. The combination of the 24mp senor and the VR is great. I had shot the older 70-300 AF-D on my D70s and D200. That lens was always something of a disappointment however. For well over a year, I had been wanting to step up to FX. I had used a friend's D700 back when they first came out and secretly coveted it. So I was seriously contemplating a used D700 from ebay or wherever I could find a decent example. Prices however, were stubbornly holding just north of $1500. Finding the D600 on clearance was a stroke of luck. Gave me twice the resolution and all of the attendant improvements five years brings with it as well as getting me into an FX body. I could now fully utilize all of my lens without the crop factor and the reduced angle-of-view. My 50mm 1.4AF no longer behaved like a 75mm. For the price of a five-year old D700 with possible unknown issues and no warranty, I walked out the door with a brand new D600. Since then I have taken the time to learn how to fully use this camera. I bought David Busche's book and have managed to shoot some good stuff over the winter up here in Maine. Early this month, Nikon contacted me about the service advisory on the dust issue. Registering your gear with Nikon is highly recommended. I followed the instructions and dropped my camera at the UPS store on a Friday. Nikon had it by the next Monday and about two weeks later, UPS delivered it back to my doorstep. The work consisted of a replacement shutter and associated parts and cleaning which included the sensor. The work reset the shutter count to zero and it restored the camera default settings. So I have to tweak my settings back to where I like them. When I sent it in, it had just under 2000 frames. I was starting to see a couple of dust spots in the upper right quadrant of my images. But not like the horror stories other owners have reported. Currently the body has about 150 frames taken on the new shutter and I have not seen any contamination issues yet. I do not know what shutter was used as a replacement. Speculation is that it is from the D610. All in all, a great camera. A lot of people may take exception with this, but I think the D600 is as close to a viable refresh of the D700 as you will find at a reasonable price point. The lighter consumer build not withstanding, it is well worth considering. March 24, 2014
Great features lightweight package! I purchased a refurbished Nikon d600 in October of 2013. The image quality from this camera is astounding and the high ISO capabilities are amazing. I mostly photograph weddings and events, and I have to say that this camera has exceeded my expectations in almost every category. The only problem I have is with the AF locking focus when you are in low light, which is where most cameras struggle. I highly recommend this camera to anyone looking for professional camera image quality in a lightweight, but sturdy, package. March 20, 2014
Outstanding camera for a great price. I see a lot of complaints about the dust/oil sensor issue. It didn't happen to all cameras and Nikon is now replacing the shutters and offering a free clean, regardless of whether or not it's in warranty anymore. The hassle aside, this is a magnificent camera. It hands down smashes the Canon 6d and the Sony A99. Even the issue of the focus points being crowded near the center doesn't seem to affect much in my opinion. When working with portraits or macro where fine details are the key, manual focus is my choice anyway. So, compare this camera to the D610 and realize that for several hundred dollars less, you can essentially have the same camera. You decide. March 18, 2014
Exceptional camera, very affordable for what it offers. Incredible value This is a wonderful camera. Yes it has a ton of features but most important it takes absolutely stunning pictures and video and is so easy to handle and customize. As others have noted you will want to invest as much as possible on good lenses, the resolution of this sensor really shines with pro level glass. The relatively affordable 50 1.4g will quickly highlight this compared to a kit lens. I found this camera an easy choice, 20k+ clicks and no issues at all. If the budget allows just get one, you wont regret it! I've never looked back, loved the DX format but this is much much better, trifling complaints are just that, anybody giving a 1 star review is viewing life with a different perspective entirely & I'd wonder how say a D40 would be reviewed. It is a great camera, as anybody who used it knows, would that rate as -4 negative star? The Nikon D600 is fantastic, ground breaking stuff, so is the 28-300 ED VR lens, don't listen to the haters, any product can be torn apart, these products are a credit to Nikon and fabulous innovative products, simple as that!! Enjoy them if you are able. March 13, 2014
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D600
 
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DOES THE D600 HAVE A ACCESSORY BATTERY GRIP

Sep 18, 2012 by
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Anonymous
FLORIDA
 on D600
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1 year, 6 months ago
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Anonymous
FLORIDA
Location : 
FLORIDA
Age: Over 65
Favorite Subject: Landscape
Nikon Family: 11-20 years
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist
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Answer: 
Yes. The MB-D14 http://www.nikonusa.com/Nikon-Produ....
Sep 19, 2012 by
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NikonStaff2

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Answer: 
Yes, MB-D14 for around $300
Sep 19, 2012 by
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JoeR
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D600
 
2 Answers

does it have hdmi 10 bit out?

Sep 18, 2012 by
by
Anonymous
 on D600
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1 year, 6 months ago
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Answer: 
Sorry, the bit rate is selectable at either 12 or 24 mbps.

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Answer: 
Type C mini pin connector.
Sep 18, 2012 by
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JoeR
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Has staff answer
D600
 
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View finder 100% in Fx why is Dx ony 97%

Sep 21, 2012 by
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Maze
NYC
 on D600
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I cannot figure out why since there is clearly LCD framing in the viewfinder showing the crop why there is 97%?
1 year, 6 months ago
by
Maze
NYC
Location : 
NYC
Age: 45-54
Favorite Subject: Landscape
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: Less than a month
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist
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Answer: 
I can take an educated guess.

In terms of captured pixels, full-frame (FX) yields 6,016 x 4,016, whereas the DX crop mode yields a 3,936 x 2,624 image.

While the viewfinder is optical, there is an LCD overlay that provides things like grid lines and the focus points. To show the DX crop exactly (i.e., at 100 percent), the LCD would have to have a resolution of about 24 million dots -- way more than needed for the basic viewfinder overlay functions. (The LCD monitor on the back of the camera only has 921,000 dots.)

The 97 percent spec, therefore, represents the nearest approximation of which the viewfinder LCD overlay is capable, erring, obviously, on the side of safety.
Sep 28, 2012 by
by
FDrebin
Waca Airport (WAC), Waca, Ethiopia
Location : 
Waca Airport (WAC), Waca, Ethiopia
Age: Over 65
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: Less than a month
Role: Professional photographer

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Answer: 
Please click on the link below for information:
http://www.nikonusa.com/en/Learn-An...
Sep 25, 2012 by
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NikonStaff
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D600
 
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Is the D600 able to save images as both JPEG and RAW at the same time?

Sep 22, 2012 by
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Anonymous
 on D600
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1 year, 6 months ago
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Answer: 
Moreover, you have the option to save all of your RAW images to the SD card in Slot 1 while saving all of your JPEG images to the SD card in Slot 2. You don't have to do it that way (i.e., you can save both format files to the same card), but you have the choice.
Sep 29, 2012 by
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FDrebin
Veen, Bjerkreim, Norway
Location : 
Veen, Bjerkreim, Norway
Age: 55-65
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: Less than a month
Role: Professional photographer

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Answer: 
Yes
Sep 22, 2012 by
by
JoeR
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D600
 
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D600 External Audio Inputs

Sep 25, 2012 by
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Anonymous
 on D600
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Does the D600 have an external stereo line input for audio, or just an external stereo microphone input?
1 year, 6 months ago
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Anonymous
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Answer: 
There is a menu-accessed microphone sensitivity adjustment, which provides input level control for either the built-in or external mics. There are 20 discrete adjustment levels. The lowest of these should accommodate line level signals.

So, no, there is no line input per se. The mic input, however, might be usable for line signals at low gain. It might be best, nevertheless, to use an inline pad.
Sep 27, 2012 by
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FDrebin
Lithou Close, Liverpool, Merseyside L5, UK
Location : 
Lithou Close, Liverpool, Merseyside L5, UK
Age: 55-65
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: Less than a month
Role: Professional photographer

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Answer: 
Mic input and a headphone jack.
Sep 25, 2012 by
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JoeR
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I am attracted to the light weight and WiFi of the D600 compared to the D800, but want a better sense of the print quality compromise. Thanks.
1 year, 6 months ago
by
JLK
Los Angeles
Location : 
Los Angeles
Age: 55-65
Favorite Subject: Landscape
Nikon Family: 6-10 years
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist
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Answer: 
16 x 24 in. would be the size at the native aspect ratio. At that size the image resolution would be 251 ppi (pixels per inch), which should be more than sufficient for a high-quality print.
Oct 8, 2012 by
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FDrebin
Haw, Co. Donegal, Ireland
Location : 
Haw, Co. Donegal, Ireland
Age: 55-65
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: Less than a month
Role: Professional photographer

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Answer: 
About 13 1/2 by 20 inches at 300 DPI. At 16 x 20 you will not notice any appreciable loss of dpi.
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D600
 
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Are there differences between the auto mode and the P mode, if so, what are they?

Oct 8, 2012 by
by
BugExterminator
California, USA
 on D600
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Just bought a D600 a few days ago and now learning about the camera and how to use it.
1 year, 6 months ago
by
BugExterminator
California, USA
Location : 
California, USA
Age: 55-65
Favorite Subject: Nature
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: Less than a month
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist
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Answer: 
The P mode is one of the four advanced shooting modes: P, S, A, and M. All of them give you full control over camera settings, the only difference being how exposure is handled. The Auto and Auto (Flash Off) modes basically turn the camera into a point-and-shoot. There are many differences; here are just a few:

In Auto mode you are dialed into matrix metering. You cannot change to spot or center-weighted as you can in the advanced modes.

In Auto mode, the flash pops up when the camera decides you need it. You can choose the Auto (Flash Off) mode if you don't want this to happen. In the advanced mode, you always decide if and when to use the flash.

In Auto mode, neither exposure compensation nor bracketing are available.

In Auto mode, white balance is set to Auto and you cannot change it.

In Auto mode, many custom settings assigned to the Function and Depth-of-Field Preview buttons are unavailable.

It would be nice if Nikon compiled a table showing which camera functions are available in which shooting modes. I haven't seen anything like that.

Regarding the P mode, more pros than you might think use this setting. Rather than having to decide with each shot whether to go aperture- or shutter-priority, the P mode interactively enables you to go through the entire available set of shutter speed and aperture combinations for the determined exposure value using the main command dial to shift the program.
Oct 11, 2012 by
by
FDrebin
Ancho, Montemorelos, Nuevo León, Mexico
Location : 
Ancho, Montemorelos, Nuevo León, Mexico
Age: 55-65
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: Less than a month
Role: Professional photographer

+4points
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Answer: 
Auto mode the camera does everything and you have no control.
Programmed auto the camera will do everything but you can still adjust the aperture and shutter speed. You can also use auto ISO and set minimum shutter speed.
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1 year, 6 months ago
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Nikon newbee
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Answer: 
Left and right arrows will indicate whether you are focused behind or in front of your intended subject. You are in focus when the dot appears. Any of the 39 focus points can be selected for this "electronic rangefinder" function.

The D600 does not have interchangeable focusing screens to my knowledge.
Oct 8, 2012 by
by
FDrebin
Okinawa Prefecture, Japan
Location : 
Okinawa Prefecture, Japan
Age: 55-65
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: Less than a month
Role: Professional photographer

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Answer: 
In focus dot for lenses with a max aperture of 5.6 or faster.
Oct 8, 2012 by
by
JoeR
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D600
 
2 Answers

Is there a limit for SD card capacity D600 can handle?

Oct 10, 2012 by
by
marciano
Montevideo, Uruguay
 on D600
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Which is the recommended read/write speed I would need for a card?
1 year, 6 months ago
by
marciano
Montevideo, Uruguay
Location : 
Montevideo, Uruguay
Age: 45-54
Favorite Subject: Landscape
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: Less than a month
Role: Professional photographer
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Answer: 
Sorry forgot the link:http://imaging.nikon.com/lineup/dslr/d600/spec.htm
Oct 10, 2012 by
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JoeR

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Answer: 
Approved memory cards ( scroll to bottom of page). Get a UHS-1 class card.
Oct 10, 2012 by
by
JoeR
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D600
 
2 Answers

Angle of View on D600 with DX lens?

Oct 19, 2012 by
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Example: NikonPro. For privacy reasons, do not use your full name or email address.
 on D600
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When using the 18-200mm DX lens on the D600, does the lens still provide a 76*-8* degree angle of view?

It seems to me that using this lens on a DX body gives a wider image when compared to using DX mode on the D600.

I know that using FX lenses on a DX body will produce a cropped image, for example a 35mm FX lens produces an image equivalent to a 50mm DX lens, but does this also happen when using DX lenses on a FX camera in DX mode?
Sample Photos & Videos
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1 year, 5 months ago
by
Example: NikonPro. For privacy reasons, do not use your full name or email address.
Age: 18-24
Nikon Family: 2-5 years
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist
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Answer: 
Expanding on earlier response with sample images.

Tripod position locked down, D600 and D300 attached in turn via quick-release-type mount. 18-200 set to 18mm. Both cameras set to ISO 500, manual exposure mode. All exposures the same: f/5.6 @ 1/20 sec. RAW images processed in Capture NX2 -- no crop, default settings except white balance. Images downsized, captioned, and saved as JPEG in Photoshop with no other processing. D600 Vignette Control set to off (although this should not matter when using a DX lens).
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Oct 22, 2012 by
by
FDrebin
Hokkaido Prefecture, Japan
Location : 
Hokkaido Prefecture, Japan
Age: 55-65
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: Less than a month
Role: Professional photographer

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Answer: 
"When using the 18-200mm DX lens on the D600, does the lens still provide a 76*-8* degree angle of view?"

That depends on whether or not you use the DX crop feature on the D600 (which is on by default). The EFFECTIVE angle of view will be narrower with DX crop because you're using only the central portion of the sensor. The 18-200mm fitted on a DX sensor camera body or a FX sensor camera body with DX crop engaged behaves as though you were using a 27-300mm lens in terms of 35mm film full-frame.

"It seems to me that using this lens on a DX body gives a wider image when compared to using DX mode on the D600."

I don't find this to be the case. I have the D600, the D300, the D80, and the 18-200. I find the angles of view to be equivalent within a few pixels (when I engage auto DX crop on the D600).

"...for example a 35mm FX lens produces an image equivalent to a 50mm DX lens..."

No, no, no. A 35mm lens is a 35mm lens. Lens manufacturers do not change the focal length value they stamp on their lenses on the basis of any reduction in sensor size (with respect to full-frame). For example, my point-and-shoot camera has a lens marked 6.0-22.5mm. In the specs and marketing material, the lens is described as having an angle of view EQUIVALENT to 28-105mm on a full-frame sensor camera. Get it?

The 18-200 can be used in non-crop (FX) mode on the D600, but you will get severe vignetting. (It's actually not too bad at the 200mm end, though.) And, yes, the wider angle of view in that case means the lens is no longer as "telephoto" as it was for you on a DX body or in DX crop mode.
Oct 21, 2012 by
by
FDrebin
Bes', Krasnoyarsk Krai, Russia
Location : 
Bes', Krasnoyarsk Krai, Russia
Age: 55-65
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: Less than a month
Role: Professional photographer
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D600
 
2 Answers

supported by nikon capture control pro 2?

Oct 30, 2012 by
by
Anonymous
barrington illinois
 on D600
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Does camera control 2 support nikon d600 and d800
1 year, 5 months ago
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Anonymous
barrington illinois
Location : 
barrington illinois
Nikon Family: 21+ years
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Answer: 
Assuming you mean CAMERA Control Pro 2, support for the D600 was added at version 2.12.0 (the latest version at this writing).

If you mean Capture NX2, support for the D600 was added at version 2.3.4 (also the latest at this writing)

Both programs have supported the D800 since that camera's introduction.
Oct 31, 2012 by
by
FDrebin
Maupiti Airport (MAU), French Polynesia
Location : 
Maupiti Airport (MAU), French Polynesia
Age: 55-65
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: 1-3 months
Role: Professional photographer

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Answer: 
Yes to both
Oct 30, 2012 by
by
JoeR
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D600
 
2 Answers

is there a frame rate penalty in the d600 using 14bit images

Nov 3, 2012 by
by
matt
seattle
 on D600
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1 year, 5 months ago
by
matt
seattle
Location : 
seattle
Age: 45-54
Favorite Subject: Landscape
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: Less than a month
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist
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Answer: 
No penalty, it will shoot almost right at 5.5 frames per second up until the buffer is full.

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Answer: 
I don't notice any difference with a quick stopwatch test.

I would expect this to be the case because you would have to be shooting RAW in order use the 14-bit setting. RAW capture does not incur the in-camera processing overhead JPEG does, and the slightly larger file size does not seem to be a bottleneck.

The number of shots that can be buffered in the camera's internal memory, however, is reduced (obviously because of the larger file size), so it is conceivable that one can more easily reach a buffer full condition with slower memory cards.
Nov 3, 2012 by
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FDrebin
St Andrew, Grenada
Location : 
St Andrew, Grenada
Age: 55-65
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: 1-3 months
Role: Professional photographer
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I don't know much about DSLR cameras, I pretty much can just use them on auto. Any helpful tips would be greatly appreciated.
1 year, 5 months ago
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k
Lockport, NY 14094, USA
Location : 
Lockport, NY 14094, USA
Age: 25-34
Favorite Subject: Family & Friends
Nikon Family: 0-1 years
Role: Just getting started with photography
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Answer: 
If you are looking for an honest answer, I must say that D600 is a great camera as far as the picture sharpness and low light photography goes, however, you shouldn't be waisting over $2000 on this camera. Read the low rating comments in the review section first.There is a serious issue with the sensor collecting dust and oil particles after taking a few hundred shots. If you don't trust me or the reviewers low ratings, you can certainly waiste your money to learn first hand about this issue.
Nov 29, 2012 by
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Nikon user
New York, NY, USA
Location : 
New York, NY, USA
Age: 35-44
Favorite Subject: Travel
Nikon Family: 11-20 years
Experience: 1-3 months
Role: Professional photographer

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Answer: 
When I got mine 3 things made it better for me than the D800: a little smaller/lighter because I'm disabled, higher frame rate, and of course $900 less. I figure I don't really need 36MP vs "only" 24. Would have been nice to have more shots per multiple exposure, but not that big a deal. D3 or D4 are out of the question for obvious reasons. But a full frame sensor is a must.
I think the D600 is a fabulous camera for a starting pro!
Nov 12, 2012 by
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jimjomac
So MD
Location : 
So MD
Age: Over 65
Favorite Subject: Nature
Nikon Family: 2-5 years
Experience: 1-3 months
Role: Semi-professional photographer
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D600
 
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Does the D 600 Measure up to replacing the 300s?

Nov 20, 2012 by
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ken
rochester, ny
 on D600
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I own a d80 and have been very pleased with it but have some heavy lenses (i.e. nikon 24-70 f1.8) and really miss the full metal body of the 200 or 300. Does the 600 have this or do I need to move tot the 800 or wait?? I want the video capability and security of the heavier full magnesium body...
1 year, 4 months ago
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ken
rochester, ny
Location : 
rochester, ny
Age: 45-54
Favorite Subject: Family & Friends
Nikon Family: 2-5 years
Experience: More than a year
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist
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Answer: 
"...have some heavy lenses (i.e. nikon 24-70 f1.8) and really miss the full metal body of the 200 or 300."

The D300 weighs 29 oz. The D600 weighs 27 oz. (Body only, no battery.)

If it's the weight, I can tell you that difference is negligible. I, too, own some heavy glass and have both the D300 and the D600. The D600 is NOT a lightweight DSLR even in the literal sense. If you must have those extra two ounces, add some lead tape.

"I want the video capability and security of the heavier full magnesium body."

Video capability is not related to a "heavier full magnesium body." Both the D600 and D800 have Full HD video capture capability even though the D600 has a hybrid polycarbonate/magnesium body. I can't offer a conclusive opinion about security.

"Does the 600 have this or do I need to move to the 800 or wait?"

Now you're juggling several variables, and I don't know what's the most important to you -- weight, resolution, body construction? I can tell you this: Any fears I had about the D600 not having an all-magnesium body were allayed the moment I picked mine up and starting shooting with it. It has a solid feel that's closer to my D300 than my D80. On the other hand, I don't subject my camera bodies to extreme physical conditions, so my priorities might not be the same as yours.
Nov 21, 2012 by
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FDrebin
Amazon River - Brazil
Location : 
Amazon River - Brazil
Age: 55-65
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: 1-3 months
Role: Professional photographer

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Answer: 
Magnesium alloy top and rear, polycarbonate front-plate. The video quality is excellent, full manual control of exposure, manual or full time auto focus. It is 760 grams vs 900 grams on the D800.(with battery) So it is about a quarter of a pound lighter. Your 24-70 lens weighs 900 grams so it is the same weight as the D800 but heavier than the D600.
Nov 21, 2012 by
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JoeR
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I will use my D600 for video at 80% of the time and for pictures at 20%.
1 year, 3 months ago
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Anonymous
Nikon Family: 11-20 years
Experience: Less than a month
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist
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Answer: 
Thank you very much for your answer. I put the question because I bought this lens having in mind to do some scenes with shallow depth of field. I also bought a FX 28-85 to be able to zoom and vary the distances.
Apart from this, I was using Nikon since 2001 or so, but all the lenses I had before are DX and I have not the intention to use them with the D600; the test I have made are not very positive.
In the future I will keep on going for the FX formats; as I said, I will mostly use it for video.
Thanks again and Happy New Year.
Jose
Jan 3, 2013 by
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Anonymous

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Answer: 
It will work fabulously, if 50mm is what you need. Depends on what your shootin' and from what distance# If a variety, which is likely, you might find the fixed FL limiting, you might want a good zoom to react to changing conditions# But the 1#4 aperture will be nice in low light! Are you considering buying the system, or do you already have a variety of Nikon lenses? If you're buying your first Nikon equipment, I'd recommend a zoom# I've done a little time-lapse with my D600 and 28-300, and I can't imagine making it any better than it already is#
Jan 2, 2013 by
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jimjomac
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D600
 
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Can I include the sun in the frame?

Dec 23, 2012 by
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The Colorado Image
Glenwood Springs, CO 81601, USA
 on D600
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Just purchased the D600 and the first warning in the OM manual says to keep the sun completely out of the frame. Shooting nature, scenics, and other creative outdoor shots, I place the sun in the frame alot (not only in sunsets and sunrises). Please provide guidance not opinion.
1 year, 3 months ago
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The Colorado Image
Glenwood Springs, CO 81601, USA
Location : 
Glenwood Springs, CO 81601, USA
Age: 55-65
Favorite Subject: Nature
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist
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Answer: 
What Nikon means is don't point the camera at the sun and leave it. A polarizing filter makes a BIG difference in direct or indirect sunlight, try it and see.
Dec 23, 2012 by
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JoeR

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Answer: 
If the lens has internal focus use a circular polarizing filter.
Dec 23, 2012 by
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JoeR
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D600
 
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Can you turn Auto Tripod Detection off?

Dec 23, 2012 by
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Mark A
Rhode Island
 on D600
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I use a sling that attaches to the tripod screw hole and want to know if this will affect VR.
1 year, 3 months ago
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Mark A
Rhode Island
Location : 
Rhode Island
Age: 45-54
Favorite Subject: Nature
Nikon Family: 2-5 years
Experience: Less than a month
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist
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Answer: 
Typo: the tripod detection is in the lens VR system, when it senses no movement the VR is shut off.
Dec 23, 2012 by
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JoeR

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Answer: 
The VR detection is in the lens VR system, when you press the shutter the camera senses lack of movement not the tripod screw. I assume you use a carry speed sling, I use it and there is no problem I can turn the VR on and off at will.
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D600
 
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where this product made ? in japan or thailand factory?

Jan 3, 2013 by
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Anonymous
turkey
 on D600
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Products related to my question
 
 
 
1 year, 3 months ago
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Anonymous
turkey
Location : 
turkey
Age: 25-34
Nikon Family: 2-5 years
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Answer: 
Mine says Thailand.
Jan 5, 2013 by
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FDrebin
Antarctica
Location : 
Antarctica
Age: 55-65
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: 3-6 months
Role: Professional photographer

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Answer: 
Mine is made in Thailand.
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D600
 
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What are best (And least expensive) lenses for D600? Including 50mm "normal"?

Jan 18, 2013 by
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Jim From Maine
Veazie, Maine
 on D600
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1 year, 2 months ago
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Jim From Maine
Veazie, Maine
Location : 
Veazie, Maine
Age: Over 65
Favorite Subject: Landscape
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: Less than a month
Role: Semi-professional photographer
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Answer: 
think of your camera and lenses as a pair of eyeglasses. your camera as the frame, and the lenses as the lenses. if your frame is made of platinum with gold inlay and sterling sliver screws you still can't see if you have bad lenses. save your money and wait. you sent a lot $$$ for a great camera now buy some great lenses. you'll never regret the investment and they will last and work for years with new cameras yet to come.
Feb 8, 2013 by
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fred
fleming ohio
Location : 
fleming ohio
Age: 45-54
Favorite Subject: Nature
Nikon Family: 11-20 years
Experience: More than 20 years
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist

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Answer: 
afs 28mm 1.8g, 50mm afs1.8g, 85mm afs 1.8g and for reach the new 70-200 afs f/4/.
This is taking into consideration price versus quality.
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D600
 
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Is there any modifications dealt on the AF-tuning to get a sharp details?

Feb 28, 2013 by
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Anonymous
 on D600
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When I bought the camera , sharp portraits' details were highly noticeable but by time the details were getting smoother ... I tried the AF-tune but I was asking If there any better solution to fix this issue... like cleaning the sensor or something?
1 year, 1 month ago
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Anonymous
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Answer: 
Assuming the technique in the OP holds up to scrutiny, firmware could potentially automate the process of fine tuning via the following procedure:

User selects a menu item/button that reads "Fine-tune AF"
Firmware prompts the user to position the camera so that the center AF point is over a high-contrast target, preferably with the camera mounted on a tripod. Firmware prompts user to press a button to continue. Everything from this point is automated...
Firmware lifts mirror and performs multiple CDAF (LV) acquisitions to establish the maximum contrast possible, then performs a final CDAF series to re-achieve the maximum determined contrast.
Firmware drops mirror and samples the PDAF sensor to establish the split-beam direction (front/back focusing) and magnitude (delta) from what would otherwise be sampled as a centered PDAF reading. Firmware converts that delta to an AF tune value, rounding to the nearest integer if necessary. Preferably firmware would implement higher-precision AF tune increments than what is presently available, since the delta measured through this process would presumably be more precise than a user-measured reading.
Firmware stores the reading in nonvolatile-memory and the procedure is done.
The process would only take a few seconds, depending on how many CDAF samples are necessary to establish optimal contrast. It would fast enough where photographers could take spot readings in the field if they wanted, tuning the AF for specific lighting conditions/shooting distances/etc..
Mar 2, 2013 by
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Arijit
Belgharia, Kolkata, West Bengal, India
Location : 
Belgharia, Kolkata, West Bengal, India
Age: 35-44
Favorite Subject: Nature