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Every photo will astound.
Every video will dazzle.

Hold in your hands an HD-SLR able to capture images rivaled only by those produced with a medium-format camera: extremely low noise, incredible dynamic range and the most faithful colors. Meet the Nikon D800, a 36.3 megapixel FX-format HD-SLR for professional photographers who require end results of the highest quality, who demand superior performance, speed, handling and a fully integrated imaging system. For cinematographers and multimedia professionals, 36.3 MP means true 1080p HD cinematic quality video and includes inputs for stereo microphones and headphones, peak audio meter display, DX crop mode to maximize NIKKOR lens selection and angle of view and much more.
FX
Format
36.3
Megapixels
4 FPS
Continuous Shooting
ISO 100–6,400
(Expandable to 25,600)
FULL HD
1080p at 30/25/24p

Reveal every nuance, every detail

The 36.3 megapixel FX-format advantage

Wedding, commercial or landscape, the D800 is the ultimate 36.3 MP FX-format camera for creative genius. Witness tonal range and precision rendered to supreme clarity, depth and texture. Make poster sized prints without sacrificing detail. Explore creative opportunities with ISO 100 to 6400 (expanded up to 25,600)—shoot from dawn to dusk. Experience Nikon's new Advanced Scene Recognition System featuring the 91,000-pixel RGB light meter capable of rendering unprecedented levels of accuracy to AF, AE, i-TTL flash control, face recognition and auto white balance. Nikon's new EXPEED 3 image processing reduces color phase shifts seen with lesser systems, producing more faithful colors and tones while managing massive amounts of data at breakthrough speed. With the D800 in your hands, achieve what was once unreachable.

Broadcast quality video

A full cinematic experience

Filmmakers, multimedia professionals and event photographersrecord Full HD 1080p at 30/25/24p or 720p at 60/50p in AVC format. Produce to your exacting vision when working in manual mode, controlling aperture, ISO, AF and shutter speed. Record uncompressed files via HDMI to an external recording device. via HDMI. Widen production perspective using either Nikon FX or DX lens formats at Full HD 1080p and 16:9 aspect ratio. Attach headphones and check audio levels or monitor input via peak audio meters as displayed on the camera's LCD monitor. Microphone sensitivity can be adjusted in up to 20 steps. Remotely start and stop video. Simultaneous Live View on the camera's LCD monitor and external monitor during recording are possible.

Render every megapixel with precision

Fast, precise 51-point wide area coverage

Precise AF detection is critical to sharply render every pixel of the D800's massive resolution count. An improved 51- point AF system with 15 Cross Type AF sensors, versatile AF area modes and superb AF detection in even the dimmest lighting deliver immediate, pinpoint focus. Fast shot-to-shot time, full resolution frame rate up to 4 fps, 6 fps in DX crop mode and ultra fast CF and SD card write times. For more productive workflow, high-speed data transfer using USB 3.0 is realized. For demanding professionals, the D800 responds immediately and precisely.

Versatile shooting, fluid operation

Streamlined ergonomic design puts critical tasks a touch away

Intuitive design makes D800 operation a thing of beauty. A streamlined ergonomic body allows critical photography and video tasks, including Movie Record, Live View, White Balance and Picture Control to be performed at the touch of a button. Confirm image capture and view menu options, histograms, video settings and more using the D800's super sharp 3.2-inch 921,000-dot LCD screen with 100% coverage. Anti-glare coating and auto brightness control ease of viewing, no matter the environment. Enlarge images up to 46x for on-the-spot focus confirmation. Magnesium alloy construction and environmental sealing make the D800 as comfortable in the field as in the studio.
EXPEED 3 image processing

Nikon's EXPEED 3 technology extends and assures breathtakingly rich image fidelity and reduces noise, even at high ISO's. EXPEED 3 is so powerful that it handles data-intensive tasks such as Full-HD video recording at 30p with ease.

Rich image previewing

The D800's 3.2-inch super-sharp 921,000 LCD monitor automatically adjusts LCD brightness and visibility according to your environment for bright, crisp image playback, menu adjustment and Live View shooting. Enlarge images up to 46x to make on the spot focus confirmation—crucial for high resolution shooting.

Expand dynamic range with built-in HDR

Create a single image revealing an extremely wide dynamic range, but with less noise and rich color gradation than ever before. Combine two exposures at up to 3EV.

Dedicated picture control button

The convenient Picture control button provides six preset options: Vivid, Monochrome, Neutral, Standard, Landscape and Portrait for stills and video while 9 customizable settings provide advanced, personalized color control.

D800 and D800E

Which camera is right for you?

Every Nikon DSLR camera uses an optical low pass filter (OLPF) in front of its sensor to slightly blur the image at a pixel level in order to reduce the occurrence of false colors and moiré that can appear when shooting repetitive and/or fine patterns. For the vast majority of photographers the D800 provides an ideal balance between sharpness and effectively prevented moiré and false color, ideal for shooting using all file formats. D800E is a specialized camera that removes the "effect" of the OLPF which results in a slight gain in sharpness and resolution and is recommended for studio and still life professionals but carries an increased possibility that moiré and false color will appear.

Strikes an ideal balance between sharpness and preventing the occurrence of false color and moiré for consistent performance
Ideal for:
  • All shooting situations
  • Photographers shooting RAW (NEF), JPG or TIFF images
  • Photographers who do not want to adjust their workflow (via software) to reduce the occurrence of moiré and false color
Slight increase in sharpness and resolution with increased occurrence of false color and moiré
Ideal for:
  • Studio, commercial and still life photographers who can control their shooting conditions, lens selection and aperture choice, as well as use of software (Capture NX2) to reduce the occurrence of false color and moiré
  • Medium format photographers whose current digital system do not utilize an optical low pass filter
  • Shooting RAW (NEF)
  • More information on moiré Behind the Scenes: D800/D800E

D800 and D800E Image Comparison

Comparison of false color and moiré

With the D800E, false color and moiré may be noticeable when shooting repetitive and/or fine patterns.

Comparison of resolution

Compared to the D800, the D800E reproduces textures with slightly higher resolution for sharper rendering and greater depth.

What Else is Different?

Other than the very slight image quality differences described above, the D800 and D800E perform exactly the same. Focus speed, exposure metering, shooting speed, movie recording, accessory compatibility, control location and function, and all other aspects are identical.

Additional Features:
Standard ISO 100-6400, expandable to ISO 50-25,600 equivalent

Added ISO settings of Lo-1 (ISO 50 equivalent), Hi-1 (ISO 12,800 equivalent) and Hi-2 (ISO 25,600 equivalent) extend versatility.

Continuous shooting at up to 4 fps at full FX-format resolution

Commercial image quality teams with speed and handling to create new shooting possibilities—in the studio or on location. Shoot DX-format images up to 6fps using the optional MB-D12 Multi Power Battery Pack and batteries other than the EN-EL15

Rugged magnesium alloy construction

Effectively protected from invasive dust, moisture and tested to exceed 200,000 cycles.

Compatible with third party video accessories

As your multimedia work grows in importance, know that the D800 is compatible with a growing selection of third party video accessories.

High speed CF and SD dual memory card slots

CF cards compatible with UDMA6 as well as UDMA7 are supported. For SD cards, SDXC and UHS-1 are supported.

Two axis Virtual Horizon graphic indicator

Use either the LCD monitor or viewfinder to check if the camera is level—horizontally or with forward or rear rotation.

Rechargeable EN-EL15 Battery

Up to approximately 900 images and 60 minutes of HD video per charge.

Expand the creative potential of the D800

NIKKOR® lenses & Nikon Creative Lighting System for every situation

Uniquely compatible with both FX and DX-formats, tap an unprecedented selection of NIKKOR lenses. Explore NIKKOR Lenses

Get studio quality lighting virtually anywhere with the Nikon Creative Lighting System and Nikon Speedlights. Explore Speedlights

Extend your Creativity and Capabilities

Express yourself creatively with a wide range of accessories, including NIKKOR lenses, Speedlights, adapters, remotes, releases and more.
Speedlights/Flashes
Speedlights/Flashes
Stereo Microphone
Stereo Microphone
NIKKOR Lenses
NIKKOR Lenses
Optimized for FX Format but compatible with extensive range of NIKKOR lenses.
D800 4.4 5 209 209
Exceeded my expectations. Stunning results, stills and video. I've shot five video television commercials so far. Clients were very pleased with the results. My only wish is on/off control of AGC audio. This camera has exceeded my expectations. September 20, 2012
AMAZING!! The quality pf pictures from this camera are amazing! I have owned D100, D300 and D300s. I have used D700 extensively. But D800 beats every other camera in the market, with respect to the quality of picftures it takes. The only complaint I have is 'the pictures (RAW) takes up a lot of my hard drive space' but it has so much details so it needs the space. September 17, 2012
I always get perfect composition in whatever lighting condition Whether I shoot in broad daylight, noon, twilight or the evening, I always get the composition I wanted. Thanks to this versatile ISO sensitivity and its whopping image sensor. The best camera I've ever had to date! Kudos Nikon! September 11, 2012
Great Product For Unmatched Price I decided to buy a full-frame a long time ago but they were either too expensive or poor in technical specs in one way. When I heard about D800 the first time it occured to me this was the camera I was waiting for. It's been hard to get my hands on this because of high customer demand. At the end it's worth waiting for. Build quality is excellent and it feels solid as a tank. I like every single spec it offered. High ISO performance is simply astonishing. One drawback if any is holding it with single hand may be hard after a while. You may need an extra hand strap if you don't want to use neck strap all day long. September 11, 2012
Powerful, amazing! Love it! Coupled the D800 with a 24-70 2.8! Powerful, sharp, Awesome job nikon! Recommended to all pro wannabes! September 7, 2012
An all-purpose marvel I received my D800E very early, in May, and it has proven to be a great camera for all occasions. For "birds in flight" it is the best I have used - very fast and accurate delivering photos with amazing detail. Shooting handheld or from a tripod, portraits come right out of the camera with stunning detail. AF-C 9-point dynamic area focusing is tailor-made for photographing busy children, and it is very, very fast. Post processing is greatly reduced with the D800E. If you shoot RAW you are going to sometime wonder if you might not just as well shoot JPEG with the D800E. But don't do it. A lot of the pleasure comes from just lurking around your photos during processing. This is a great, great camera. I was so happy with my D700 I wasn't sure I wanted this camera, but now I am so glad I bought it. August 31, 2012
Entirely Wonderful The D800 is an exceptional camera. I'd suggest it is the best digital SLR ever made. Prints come off with a lovely richness in all details. Superb colour interpretation. It's responsiveness to shadows and light captures a level of depth I've long hoped for. I love it. It feels great in the hands, and how it sounds is just right though, and this is my only disappointment, I must add that the 'Quiet Mode' is uselessly far from achieving the, I assume, intended goal. The camera's build qualities are exceptional and when coupled with the long feature set, a feature set with great options for custom settings, it all makes for a great photo taking situation. Fall this year is going to be more wonderful than ever. I hope to get out frequently for what I know will be great days with this wonderful D800! Congratulations Nikon! A job well done! August 24, 2012
Push your skill set Got my D800 on March 22, first day of release. Had such a busy summer, I have not put it through all it paces but have had several outings and have done much experimentation and processing. This camera will test your photography skills. D700 is much easier to get "sharp" because of the massive increase in detail with the D800. When you nail a shot the detail is incredible and addicting. It ruins all previous Nikon files for you. I recently purchased a new 70-200mmVR2 and 60mmG micro. This camera can be any camera. You have a variety of size and format options that can accomidate most needs. I wanted high detail and I now have it. Fast sports in high detail with some speed limitation but better than anything else when you nail focus. I did NOT get a LF issue. LCD screen is fantastic color and usability. Processing is easy with NX2 and Photoshop. It has made me a pixel peeper but that is the fun of it. Video is rich and easy to use. Batteries are used up quickly in live view but pretty normal in regular shooting with limited chimping. I have D700, D7000 and also D300. This is my dream camera. It is worth every penny to me. August 24, 2012
The camera I have always dreamed of. Photography has always been my favorite hobby. My first Nikon was an F4 and then an N2020. With small children it became difficult to take a camera kit on family trips so I switched to the pocket cameras which never made me really happy. Now that the kids are grown, my wife got me a D800 for my birthday 3 weeks ago and I haven't put it down since. With the camera I ordered the new AF 28-300mm VR lens which came 2 days ago. While waiting for the new lens to arrive I used the old (30 yrs) AF lens I had from my N2020 (50mm, 35-105, 70-210), . I was immediately impressed that not only these lens worked with the D800 but performed as I have never seen them perform since these lens require a drive motor in the camera body. The lens responded accurately, and locked on focus as if they were brand new. It is also a testament to the durability of Nikon lens. The D800 body, although a little heavy, felt comfortable and well balanced with any of the lens I used. The controls are well located and logically placed once I became familiar with them. I use the viewfinder and live view equally and even though the monitor is fixed It is big and bright so I can still hold the camera above my head and frame shots. Once I received the 28-300 VR lens I could fully appreciate the sensor. From my deck I took a handheld shot of an insect about 20 feet away in a tree at full extension of the 28-300 lens. I then cropped the insect to 909x1043 (see photo attached). The VR lens left me speechless, as you can see on the enclosed image. The detailed structure of the insect is incredible considering the minimal effort involved of setting up the shot and the unavoidable shake from the steadiest of hands. Color renditions are very accurate. The vivid color setting especially enhances photos of flowers. Again, the controls are intuitively placed, the critical functions are not burried in endless menus as in other cameras. Exposure is very accurate. The incredible flexibility of the camera was a little overwhelming (thank you Nikon for a set of very usable default settings). I am particularly fond of the HDR function. It produces excellent results without having to spend a lot of time with PhotoShop. It would have been nice to have a wider selection of EV separations. On the down side, I think the a camera this expensive should have come with a built in GPS and infrared or wireless communication capability. The shutter button, although smooth, does not give any tactile feel for when it is half depressed. The center of the shutter release should also have a tactile indicator since the button is flush with the on/off control and the index finger can get lost on the top of the camera. The included strap is a little flimsy for a camera+lens that weights in at 4 lbs. All this said, this is the finest camera I have ever owned or used. I can't wait to use it more. August 19, 2012
Fantastic Nikon D800 I was a bit apprehensive when I ordered the D800, which I've had now for less than three monts. I've read reviews that ran the gamut from good to bad ---- most were good, and was concerned about remarks from some indicating it was hard to get sharp images without a tripod. Well, I've had no problem using this camera without a tripod. I have always tried to keep steady when shooting with all previous cameras I've owned, and I continue to do so with this camera. I've gotten some excellent images (without a tripod) shooting with a zoom at 300mm, 1/30th second, f/8, using VR. The high ISO settings look great. Attached is a shot of the Golden Gate Bridge at ISO 6400 and another shot of Fort Point at ISO 2200. In both images I see no noise unless they're viewed at 100% --- even then, the noise is not objectionable. Since this camera has such a high megapixel count, you'll usually downsize the image ---- that pretty much eliminates the noise since it's too small to be visible. The attached images are small JPEGs and therefore don't really show the image quality due to compression artifacts and the limits imposed for images placed on internet sites like this. But, on the Golden Gate Bridge shot I was able to view the individual bricks on the structure below the tower on the right side ----- you probably can't even see the bricks in this small JPEG. I was amazed at the detail the D800 captured even at night in low light. So far, I haven't encountered any problems with this camera. I use the new 1000x speed Lexar CF and the new 600x Lexar SDXC cards and have never run into a problem with the images writing to the card fast enough; I've never filled the buffer or had to wait for images to clear the buffer. The battery life has not been a problem either. I always carry a spare battery, but have not had a problem running out of power on a shoot. So far, I've only done still shoots with this camera and have not shot much video, so video may drain the battery faster. But, if you're going to invest $3,000 in a camera you should also buy a spare battery. The only issue I've found when shooting video is the ability of the camera to follow focus ---- but most DSLR cameras have an issue with that to some degree. I didn't buy this camera to mainly shoot video, so video is just a nice extra I may use on occasion. I bought this camera to shoot stills. I've used the camera for studio work, scenics/travel, portraits, and general photography. I have not used it for weddings or sports photography, but will be using it for a wedding in September. Although the rapid frame rate is down around 4 fps, that is not a problem for the kind of images I do. If you do a lot of fast-action sports, you'd probably want to go with a Nikon D4. But, sports photographers of the past (in days of film cameras) often shot with a maximum frame rate of 4 fps and did just fine --- I think we're all becoming a bit spoiled with the capabilities of digital cameras. I highly recommend this camera; it's a pleasure to work with and I really have no negatives to report. While the camera isn't perfect, I find it's the best camera I've ever worked with. NO camera is perfect. The only changes I'd make to this camera is to revamp the menu to make it easier to use, make the camera a little lighter, improve the focus ability in video mode, and boost the frame rate to 10fps to satisfy sports photographers. None of these are big issues for me. August 17, 2012
Amazing performance in compact form. After decades of Nikon film cameras and 4 years with a D 300, I just upgraded to the D 800. Astounding is the best word I can think of. While I knew the advantages of moving to the FX format from the DX, I was amazed at how much simpler, more intuitive the D 800 is to operate, and how quick it is compared to my prior camera. Auto focus is fast and accurate, with several useful variations, all of which can be done looking though the viewfinder. No more scrolling through menus on the LCD screen. It's function in both very dim and very bright light is also well beyond my prior camera. I've had the camera 48 hours and am only 185 pages into the manual, but I've already taken 150 images and have gotten to play with too many features to describe here. I strongly recommend this camera! August 15, 2012
Exceeds expectations This camera is a JOY to use (after replacing a recalled battery and updating the firmware to prevent a 'lockup' issue): ergonomics; exceptional dynamic range (e.g., ability to capture great color in low light); very low 'noise' at higher ISO; exceptional resolution; many great features (e.g., excellent auto-ISO implementation that is sensitive to focal length, capability of switching to 'DX' format for file-size reduction and/or 1.5x focal-length boost); much more. August 13, 2012
Amazing Quality! Great quality camera. I shot my first shoot with it in Iowa this past weekend and I am completely impressed with the low iso testing I did with it. I never shot in anything higher than 600iso, so I have nothing to say there, but from what I have played with thus far I keep finding reasons why I am glad I bought this camera. The two things I don't like are the right hand grip and the zoom buttons. The grip is not nearly as comfortable as the D700. The D800 seems shorter and harder to hold onto as well. Also, the +/- zoom buttons are reversed from the D700 to the D800 which I see no reason for. So if you are used to the D700 your muscle memory with continue to frustrate you as you will be zooming out when you want to zoom in to view picture details on the LCD. Overall, this is magnificent camera that was worth every penny. August 8, 2012
Mindblowing! Of all my purchases this camera is my absolute favorite. I constantly marvel at the detail and quality of the images it produces and just how easy it is to use. August 8, 2012
One word 'WOW' My history with Nikons go back to FTNs, through F2a, F3, Nikonos, D100, D200, D2s, D3. The D800 is an outstanding camera, Nikon you have outdone yourself. August 7, 2012
All or nothing After waiting 31/2 months for my D800E I must say it was worth the wait. I have been shooting with Nikon professionally for over forty years, and this is a crowing achievement (maybe). I learned on a 4x5 view camera, and later a 'basic' Nikon F. I have to say I still love the purity of the basic camera, where you have to think before you release the shutter and you really 'make a photograph'. When it takes an almost 450 page manual to explain all the functions, features and magic (as the D800E does) it seems like technology has gone way too far .. but then again, I love my new D800E .. don't ask why .. I just do. When a secure knowledge of photography is coupled with this technological masterpiece, magic can and does happen. This is not a camera for beginners, or rich hobbyists, but a tool for those willing to make the effort to understand it, and utilize the brilliance contained within. August 7, 2012
Great camera!! Had this camera for about 2 months now, everything in this camera is great especially the focusing system and the image quality is really up to par. I would recommend this camera to everyone who's is a landscape and portrait photographer. August 7, 2012
Just got my camera after waiting 2 months I waited 2 months for it to arrive. Nikon hit the ball out of the park again. Love this camera, smooth, takes great photos and movies. It has great handling, although it is not the D3 or D3x, it is still high end enough to handle big jobs such as professional wedding photos and portraits. It handles well for landscape photography not quite made for sports and the fast action there but it does handle the job if you're not looking for a camera purely for sports photography. 5 stars August 5, 2012
Exceptional machine Colors, Clarity, design, handling, balance, options... almost sounds like I'm describing a fine automobile, or a diamond. Close! Love the photos this piece of engineering produces. For portraits, I'm using a combination strobe and natural daylight - it was easy to create a couple of custom WB settings however, I tried Auto WB... and it actually works incredibly well. The detail is amazing! Skin tones look so natural. 85MM f1.8G, 50MM f1.8G lenses used. So far, landscapes shoot terrific, and it's not heavy to carry in hand or on strap. Will shoot first wedding shortly, and while I love my D200... it will now be backup. Word of advise for anyone considering this cameral... get it, and be prepared to take it with you EVERYWHERE ! July 29, 2012
Excellent!! I bought this instead of a dirt bike & have no regrets, It's the best buzz since the introduction to the D7000. What a machine!!! July 26, 2012
Amazing quality in these massive files The RAW images that I'm pulling down are so full of color and life that I find myself spending MUCH LESS time on the computer post processing. I would not have guessed this. Last week I even uploaded and converted straight to jpeg and sent them off to a client, no saturation or exposure fiddling with the whole set. Unbelievable and I'm psyched for the time it will save me down the road. This brings up the only down side of the camera that I have found yet...when you do get on the computer the massive file sizes have jammed up my workflow and crashed my computer a few times recently. I store all files in several external harddrives and work the files on Aperture through my 5 year old macbook pro. Any heavy edits (brushes primarily) seem to jam the system pretty quickly. Might be time for me to rethink my workflow. I still go with the 5 star rating because this is no fault of the cameras and I just feel that the D800 is miles ahead and the rest of the tech world will now have to work to catch up... and it will. Time to get off the computer and back outside with my camera. July 19, 2012
Reignited my passion for photography I waited a loong time for the D800 my D700 has always been wonderful and got me through many a wedding and commercial gig, from the video to photos the 800 trumps it and any other camera i've tried or seen. In comparison to the 5d mk 2's and 3's this one takes the cake on resolution for sure, but the ability to pull out so much information from an image is unreal and worth it alone. I've never seen such vast dynamic range since medium format film. the colors and contrast that pops out of the d800 is inspiring. Not to mention the video that I've done thus far is anything anyone would need and surpassed expectations. I'm very evangelical about this camera. If you are on the fence get it. Yeah the files take up a lot of room and renders your 2 gig cards useless but it's beyond worth investing in some bigger cards to use the 800. July 17, 2012
Great Results Incredible quality but with a few quirks. Going from still to video and back again is not as transparent as it could be and some of my 32GB cards don't work. But boy are the results great! July 15, 2012
Exceeds All Expectations! This is my 4th Nikon SLR, and so it was with a bit of reluctance that I purchased the d800 - thinking I would use it occasionally for landscapes and portrait work when I felt I needed the extra pixel count, but continue to use my other Nikons for everything else. Silly girl - what was I thinking? This camera exceeds all my expectations! It takes dazzling photos. The other reviewers have done an excellent job of citing the technical merits of this camera, as well as pointing out some of the drawbacks, so I won't repeat all of that. I will say that I think the price is fair for the quality and capabilities of this camera. I've heard some pros telling beginners that it doesn't matter what camera you shoot with - you need to learn the fundamentals of photography first. I agree. But I also want to encourage every photographer, no matter what your skill or experience level, to aim for the very best equipment you can afford. While a good camera can't "make" you a better photographer, it can certainly elevate your shots to their highest levels. I sincerely believe that no matter your skill level, from beginner to pro - this camera will make all your shots sing. If you're going to spend your time and talents on photography - at any level, this camera will give you the opportunity to take your very best shots. July 7, 2012
The game changing camera.... I've had the D800 for only 2 months, a short time for a rigorous evaluation but I mind was made up within seconds of downloading the first images. A lot was predicted, argued about, panned, glorified and just discussed for a long time before it because available. The predictions, for the most part were wrong. It is not a studio or tripod only super critical overly demanding camera at all.There are no downsides in having the best sensor in the industry with 36mpx. It was a very pleasant surprise that all my lenses just worked better from top pro glass to DX kit lens, all of them performed better than on anything else. Although most talk has been about the incredible detail never seen before in a DSLR before, and rightly but the revelation was discovering the complete harmony with which all the image related subsystems worked together: metering, Auto White Balance, Active D-Lighting, Auto Focus, color, 14 stops of DR etc. With little adjustment to my shooting technique my keeper rate has risen dramatically, it is hard to take a port shot that is not very well exposed, blown highlights or lost shadows. It handles mixed lighting with AWB better than any camera I have ever used including all other Nikon pro camera and Canon. After using it for a few days the most difficult aspect of the using the camera was keeping the ear to ear grin off my face. I had gotten used to taking safety shots with prior cameras, particularly if conditions were poor and doing a lot of between shot reviews so an event might need 1,200 shots in an evening or 300 on a landscape outing. No more, after a few days and my first event, I noticed i shot a fraction of frames and stopped using the rear review display. I just knew, if my composition was good, the shot was good, every time. What a confidence builder to know that critical shots will come out right the first time, with great post processing flexibility and clean detail filled shadows. I have full confidence that the D800 is the easiest to use high performance camera available, and the best image taking device I have ever seen or used. Yes, this camera is that good! July 5, 2012
SUPERGREATFANTASTIC simply an amazing camera, finally a 35mm digital slr that will impress you. Ive always been a nikon photographer, but when nikon and canon made the transition from film to digital I switched to canon, especially due to the support canon offered at almost every professional studio worldwide, the 5d Mk 2 was/is an incrediable camera, but NIkon has set the bar now with the d800. canon is out nikon is in. the timelapse option and raw processing built into the Nikon Camera menu is actually a very useful tool. July 5, 2012
Elevates the Photography Experience Not since shooting medium format have I been more impressed by a camera and the images it produces. The dynamic range (even with HDR turned off) is unprecedented and my first photographs were at night in an urban environment. I can't believe that each exposure had information from the darkest shadows to the brightest lights without loosing critical detail. As a step up from the D700 FX-format camera, I simply could not believe that a three-fold increase in pixel density would not produce that irritating low-light noise, but it actually is slightly better at suppressing noise than the D700 (a miraculous achievement for the sensor engineers... hat's off to you, gentlemen). The sharpness is astounding, especially when you want to print BIG. I just got a 24x36" print back from the lab and I am absolutely blown away by the details and richness of colors in the color print. I do take all the precautions suggested in Nikon's technical guide (tripod and shooting with either LiveView or Mirror-Up) when I can because you really can see a loss of sharpness at the full resolution if you don't shoot rock-steady or at very high shutter speeds. The really spectacular advantage for me is the ability to crop liberally and still produce images that are detailed enough for good-sized prints. I have one exposure that produced three different "picture-in-picture" crops that are simply amazing. The only thing to be aware of... be ready to consume space on your hard drive. I often do post-processing in TIFF format (16-bit) and the file sizes are enormous (near 300MB per image, full-frame). When three or four TIFFs use up a gigabyte of space, you realize that you will soon be buying more drives. I will be shooting Yellowstone in a few days and will break out the HD Video features. I am extremely excited to have studio-quality video possibilities with this camera (and my pro lenses). A friend has shot some footage with her D800, and I cannot tell you what a game-changer this camera is for anyone who wants to expand into videography. Kubrick quality... I kid you not! I will be exercising the HDR and other features at Yellowstone, and may post another review after. This camera is a giant leap forward, and its price (while substantial) makes it the best camera for the money I believe has ever been made by anyone. July 4, 2012
SHOCKING resolution and clarity! I have been shooting Nikon for 30 years and I am so happy with the D800E and it's resolution. The detail and dynamic range is shocking. I have never seen anything like it ever, anywhere. You really need to see the NEF - RAW image to evaluate the sharpnes. Of course good camera skills are still required...but if you do your part. The D800E will do it's part. I am not a zellot and also shoot Canon, I just use the tool to get the job done...nothing personal. It really is all about the image. This tool is amazing... July 3, 2012
Amazing performance at higher ISO I LOVE my Nikon D7000 for its very high quality and great speed - I always get the shot and routinely win photo competitions with it. But I needed still more speed and noise-free performance in low-light situations, since I never use flash or other artificial light. My new D800E is yet another leap ahead of the D7000, giving me very usable, crisp images having full dynamic range and low noise at ISO 3200 and even 6400. Suddenly I have the image quality of a $20,000 medium-format camera at the price of 35 equivalent, and still only slightly bigger and heavier than my sub-35 frame D7000. June 28, 2012
It was a long wait, but worth it I didn't think this camera would ever get here, but it is so worth the wait. I amazed at the detail that is captured by its images. 1:1 crops are print worthy and in a way that probably makes sense only to me, adds new length to my lenses. Hope that makes sense to you. I am also just plain speechless on the lack of noise while capturing High ISO images. June 28, 2012
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D800
 
8 Answers

What is the best lens for the nikon d800?

Feb 21, 2012 by
by
The kid
Canada
 on D800
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+16points
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Guys, I need help choosing a lens less that 1200 dollars. It has to be either a wide angle, prime lens, or zoom lens.
2 years, 2 months ago by
by
The kid
Canada
Location : 
Canada
Favorite Subject: Landscape
Nikon Family: 0-1 years
Role: Occasional user, memory keeper
8 Answers

Answers

+1point
1out of 1found this answer helpful.
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Answer: 
Nikon 85mm 1,8G. Super sharp.
Feb 11, 2014 by
by
Anonymous

+1point
1out of 1found this answer helpful.
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Answer: 
if it were me, i would find a prime lens.
and get the best lens you can buy.

this is posted today 11/30/13 at B&H
REFURBISHED
Nikon 105mm f/2.8G ED-IF AF-S VR Micro - Refurbished by Nikon U.S.A.
SKU: NK10528AFVRR MFR: 2160B
$789.

and kid, i wouldn't steer you wrong. this is a really nice lens.
merry christmas.
Nov 30, 2013 by
by
jmf
New Jersey, USA
Location : 
New Jersey, USA
Nikon Family: 21+ years

+1point
1out of 1found this answer helpful.
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Answer: 
The first thing you need to do is determine what kinds of subjects and lighting conditions you will be facing before deciding on lenses for any dslr. Nikon has a published list of recommended lenses and DxOMark has done some very comprehensive testing to identify the best lenses in terms of image quality to match up with a D800. I shoot with 6 Nikkor lenses....16-35 f/4 VR, 70-200 f/4 VR, the f/1.8 trinity (28, 50, 85) and the 105mm f/2.8 VR micro. I have found this array allows me to cover a wide range of subject matter and lighting conditions quite well. I also have a TC-17E which I have used with the 70-200 f/4 VR and the 105 f/2.8 micro with very good results. If Nikon updates the 300mm f/4 I will add that lens to my kit...and may add the new 24-85 VR as a general purpose walk-around lens. It is half the money of the 24-120 VR and DxOMark shows it to perform almost on par.
Aug 6, 2013 by
by
Grimbot
Grimsby, ON, Canada
Location : 
Grimsby, ON, Canada
Age: 55-65
Favorite Subject: Landscape
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: 1-3 months
Role: Semi-professional photographer

+1point
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Answer: 
You already invest too many dollars on a camera to buy any lens, if you dont have lens for nikon, and you want a daily use lens, I'll go with the new 24-85mm VR F3.5-4.5, it will do the job and would give you a nice range for creativity, and the iso would help you on low ligth situations. From this point review what you want to do with your equipment to buy the next one.
Sep 7, 2012 by
by
gpfoto
Monterrey International Airport (MTY), Carretera Miguel Aleman K.M 24, 66600 Apodaca, Nuevo León, Mexico
Location : 
Monterrey International Airport (MTY), Carretera Miguel Aleman K.M 24, 66600 Apodaca, Nuevo León, Mexico
Age: 35-44
Favorite Subject: Portrait
Nikon Family: 2-5 years
Experience: 1-3 months
Role: Semi-professional photographer

+1point
3out of 5found this answer helpful.
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Answer: 
I've been using the 28-300 mm which I think is my best one. It costs around $1100, but shop around.
AL
 
Products related to my answer
 
Aug 28, 2012 by
by
AL
Dallas, TX
Location : 
Dallas, TX
Age: 45-54
Favorite Subject: Landscape
Nikon Family: 11-20 years
Experience: More than a year
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist

+4points
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Answer: 
I'm assuming by saying "the best lens" for YOU (not necessarily for others) would be one walkaround lens you could use for 90% of your shooting needs - say a 24-70mm or 24-120mm zoom. For $1200 or less you have these options from Nikon, in order of preference for YOU:

Nikon 24-120mm f/4G ED VR. I think this would serve your needs best (but it's about $1300)
Nikon 24-85mm f/3.5-4.5G ED VR (only about $600)
Nikon 28mm f/1.8G AF-S (about $700, if you really want a wide, prime lens less than $1200, but not as useful if this is your only lens)

If you are willing to go to a third-party lens, then you could consider these:

Tamron SP 24-70mm Di VC USD (about $1300, a little high but has "VC" - image stabilization)
Sigma 24-70mm f/2.8 IF EX DG HSM (about $825 but no image stabilization)

Good luck and good shooting,
James
Aug 22, 2012 by
by
James L
Long Beach, CA, USA
Location : 
Long Beach, CA, USA
Age: 35-44
Favorite Subject: Portrait
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: More than 10 years
Role: Semi-professional photographer

0points
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Answer: 
Sorry, but this is no way to go about choosing a lens!

Start by deciding exactly what you plan to photograph, and then research the lenses that are best suited to your needs. And please don't set an arbitrary limit on what you're planning to spend -- there are many options both more and less expensive than your quoted amount.

Most importantly, choose wisely. The D800 will maximize the qualities of whatever lens you mount on it -- if the qualities are poor, then your final product will suffer! Many people advise investing the greater amount in lenses over the camera body, and this is definitely something to consider very carefully!
Mar 13, 2012 by
by
Hugo First
Richmond, VA USA
Location : 
Richmond, VA USA
Age: 45-54
Favorite Subject: Nature
Nikon Family: 2-5 years
Role: Semi-professional photographer

-2points
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Answer: 
Please click on the link below for the lens simulator; it will help you to make the decision on what lens you need.
http://www.nikonusa.com/Nikon-Produ...
Feb 22, 2012 by
by
NikonStaff
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Has staff answer
D800
 
7 Answers

From the Technical Guide issued, due to the high resolution the camera must be held perfectly still or the image is blurred. True?

Feb 23, 2012 by
by
Groth
New York, NY, USA
 on D800
Has staff answer
+6points
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It's great to have a high resolution camera with many features, but if it's so sensitive that images are blurry with slight movement it can only be used on a stationary mount. In fact your technical guide says to use live view because that way the mirror isn't lifting during the picture which can cause blurring.
2 years, 1 month ago
by
Groth
New York, NY, USA
Location : 
New York, NY, USA
Age: 55-65
Favorite Subject: Travel
Nikon Family: 0-1 years
Experience: Less than a month
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist
7 Answers

Answers

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Answer: 
I have had very good results with the D800 hand-held. If you use lenses such as the 16-35 f/4 VR or the 70-200 f/4 VR you should not have any problem shooting hand-held with the D800. I also have a D7000 and find it similar in terms of hand-held technique.

If you shoot with non-VR primes you may have to shoot a tad faster than you normally would with a D700 for example. For example, shooting birds in flight at 1/1000 to 1/1250 will yield excellent results.
Aug 6, 2013 by
by
Grimbot
Grimsby, ON, Canada
Location : 
Grimsby, ON, Canada
Age: 55-65
Favorite Subject: Landscape
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: 1-3 months
Role: Semi-professional photographer

+18points
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Answer: 
I think you have to read Nikon's answer carefully. They save for "optimal" sharpness. I shoot medium format and if I want optimal sharpness I use a tripod. I have had the D800 for about 6 weeks and absolutely love the camera. There have been a couple of times where I had a shot that was blurry but the shots would have been blurry with any camera due to user error. The camera has a delayed exposure setting that when used with a tripod delivers the sharpest photos I have ever seen from any digital. I am primarily a Nikon guy but I do have a Canon 5D Mark II and my local camera store let me try the Canon 5D Mark III. The D800 was clearly sharper, which influenced my decision.
I really think the answer to your question though is dependent upon the type of photography you do. I shoot landscapes primarily and the D800 excells in this area of photography. I have found that for other types of photography that if I dial the image quality down to medium that I am still getting 20+ megapixels. I really like the versatility of the D800.
Bottom line is that if your technique is good you should not have any problems. If your technique is not good a little patience and practice you can improve your technique and have some awesome photos.
Good luck.
Jun 4, 2012 by
by
Thomas
Durham, NC
Location : 
Durham, NC
Age: 55-65
Favorite Subject: Landscape
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: 1-3 months
Role: Semi-professional photographer

+26points
27out of 28found this answer helpful.
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Answer: 
No worries.
The D800 has roughly the same pixel pitch as the D7000 and as far as blur is concerned it will behave similarly. As with ANY camera, the less motion there is during the exposure, the sharper it will be. Nikon's point is that in order to extract the greatest possible detail that the sensor is able to produce, a greater degree of care is required. If you take a photo with a D800 and shrink the image down to 16mp or 12mp or whatever, the amount of blur would be the same as if the image was taken with a lower resolution camera. If you are making 8 x 10 prints you don't need to treat the D800 any different than your current DSLR. If on the other hand you are printing at 40 x 60 inches, then a beefy weighted tripod, mirror up and a remote release will allow you to obtain the best images possible. Think of it this way, the amount of blur is no greater, but the sensor is capable of resolving it to a greater degree. Practically speaking, the added ability to resolve blur that is caused by camera motion needs to be addressed if you want to get the best results from large prints. The other place it might become noticeable is when cropping.... A 6mp image from a D70 might very well show less camera motion induced blur than a 6mp crop from a D800. However, if the D800 image is taken such that the 36mp D800 image has the same viewfinder coverage as the D70 image, the 36mp D800 will absolutely blow the D70 image away. In this case you might find some blur in details that cannot be resolved with the D70, and the elimination of THAT blur may require better technique. In summary, the D800 will not take pictures that have more blur than what you may be accustomed to, but it will allow you to resolve more detail; and that detail may have a component of blur.
Mar 28, 2012 by
by
Photogeek
Napa, CA, USA
Location : 
Napa, CA, USA
Age: 55-65
Favorite Subject: Landscape
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: Less than a month
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist

+1point
2out of 3found this answer helpful.
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Answer: 
Unfortunately the Nikon answer simply re-creates the uncertainty by seeming to say that blur will be amplified by this camera because of its high detail. It suggests that blur would not be as noticeable as with a camera of lower definition. So more care will have to be given, especially if you want to enlarge the image significantly.

As a fine point, you cannot expect the sharpest images with almost any camera at low to moderate shutter speeds without the use of a tripod or other steadying device and even mirror lock up.
Mar 19, 2012 by
by
Snappy
Portland, OR, USA
Location : 
Portland, OR, USA
Age: Over 65
Favorite Subject: Nature
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: Less than a month
Role: Semi-professional photographer

-15points
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Answer: 
Thanks. However, I didn't interpret the guide in the way you did. The example they showed employs that shutter speed, and logically it might make sense, but I get the feeling (from the NIkon team's answer as well) it is an issue with the camera and your technique has to be flawless. The biggest issue for me is this, followed by lower ISO than I expected. The camera's features otherwise seem fantastic. I have been a lifelong Canon user, and I was ready to switch, but obviously have some concerns.
Mar 8, 2012 by
by
Groth
New York, NY, USA
Location : 
New York, NY, USA
Age: 55-65
Favorite Subject: Travel
Nikon Family: 0-1 years
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist

+29points
30out of 31found this answer helpful.
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Answer: 
If you look closely at the guide, the blur is only a possibility when shooting at shutter speeds of 1/15-1s. The Nikon D800 is just as hand-holdable as a D3, D700, D3S or any other DSLR.
Mar 7, 2012 by
by
Nikonguy88
Denver, CO, USA
Location : 
Denver, CO, USA
Age: 18-24
Favorite Subject: Portrait
Nikon Family: 2-5 years
Role: Semi-professional photographer

-20points
9out of 38found this answer helpful.
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Answer: 
At the high resolutions offered by the D800/D800E, even the slightest camera motion can result in blur. The technique revealed in this section minimizes blur through a combination of live view photography and a tripod.
Feb 28, 2012 by
by
NikonStaff
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Has staff answer
D800
 
6 Answers

With the D800E will moire occur with images in nature, or is it largely manifested with fine manmade structure.

Feb 6, 2012 by
by
Robert
Maine
 on D800
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+9points
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I am a nature photographer (largely) and specifically I hope that moire will not occur on the wings of birds.
2 years, 2 months ago by
by
Robert
Maine
Location : 
Maine
Age: 55-65
Favorite Subject: Nature
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Role: Semi-professional photographer
6 Answers

Answers

+1point
1out of 1found this answer helpful.
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Answer: 
Check out the fast Nikon lenses that Nikon recommends for the d800e try the 24mm f/1.4 super sharp.
Feb 8, 2013 by
by
Anonymous

+5points
5out of 5found this answer helpful.
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Answer: 
The Nikon site has some good examples of moire in the D800E photographs. I initially ordered the D800E but subsequently switched to the D800 due to the problems with moire sans an AA filter. Yes, software can help in photographs but my understanding is that moire may be even more pronounced in videos and software will not touch that. I intend to use my D800 primarily for photographs but like the flexibility to also use it as a video camera. For most applications the clarity of detail will not be noticeable between the D800 and the D800E and the potential for considerable issues with moire with the D800E made the decision for me. We would all like to have everything but that is just not realistic in life.
Mar 6, 2012 by
by
Beso
Portland, OR, USA
Location : 
Portland, OR, USA
Age: 55-65
Nikon Family: 6-10 years
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist

+6points
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Answer: 
Check out our Learn & Explore article that discusses the moire/false color issues and how to minimize them when using the D800E. http://www.nikonusa.com/Learn-And-E...
Feb 24, 2012 by
by
NikonStaff2

+3points
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Answer: 
By and large Nikon is spot on in their evaluations of equipment. If you prefer to be out shooting and not at the computer adjusting images you should probably bypass the "E." I prefer shooting to tweaking images and have selected the D800 (waiting expectantly the arrival).

I'll shoot it for a few weeks before deciding which model for a second body. I prefer all bodies to be the identical when working. I'm old, the less confusion in life, the better. I'm betting that, unless you lean to huge enlargements, either model will suffice for your needs. That being the case, I'd select the less expensive model with a battery pack, fully expecting that 36.3MP will provide all the detail you'd want or need.

If you have a local Nikon dealer, rent or borrow both models and do an evaluation if you think the "low pass" might be a consideration.

50 years shooting wildlife mostly in Alaska, semi-professionally, using predominately Nikon bodies and lenses
Feb 18, 2012 by
by
Warren
Alaska
Location : 
Alaska
Age: 55-65
Favorite Subject: Nature
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Role: Semi-professional photographer

+7points
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Answer: 
Download the model photo taken with the D800e camera and check out her fabric outfit; there is no moire patterns at all. Many 2 1/4 backs have no anti-aliasing filter and they get along just fine. Also, if you have a problem, you can add a CapRock AA filter on the lens, or remove the problem in software.
Feb 11, 2012 by
by
F64photo
Rochester, NY, USA
Location : 
Rochester, NY, USA
Age: Over 65
Favorite Subject: Landscape
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist

+7points
7out of 7found this answer helpful.
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Answer: 
I read fabrics, some bird feathers and architectural details will have very pronounced moire with D800e. Organic surfaces: faces, landscape and natural surfaces will have greater resolution(detail) when used with great glass($). IMHO D800e is special use(have multiple camera's), not for all around use. Heck 36MP will have massive detail and resolution to begin with.
Feb 7, 2012 by
by
Funduro
Tampa Bay, FL, USA
Location : 
Tampa Bay, FL, USA
Age: 45-54
Favorite Subject: Nature
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist
8 people are following this questionFollow This Question
D800
 
5 Answers

Is there an easy way to check number of the pictures taken by my D800?

Mar 28, 2013 by
by
Yevgen
Watertown, MA, USA
 on D800
+3points
3out of 3found this question helpful.
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I use camera for near one year and would like to know for how long I can use it. Is anybody know easy way count all data made by this camera, except using third party websites.

Thanks
1 year ago
by
Yevgen
Watertown, MA, USA
Location : 
Watertown, MA, USA
Age: 55-65
Favorite Subject: Sports
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: 6-12 months
Role: Professional photographer
5 Answers

Answers

-1point
0out of 1found this answer helpful.
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Answer: 
On Flickr the EXIF info will tell you this information as the image number which is about 13 from the bottom of the list.
Feb 18, 2014 by
by
phototed
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: More than a year
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist

-1point
0out of 1found this answer helpful.
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Answer: 
Even Picasa should give you the shutter count in the Exif. It does with my D70S and D7100
Jan 3, 2014 by
by
Anonymous
Age: Over 65
Favorite Subject: Landscape
Nikon Family: 2-5 years
Experience: Less than a month
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist

+1point
2out of 3found this answer helpful.
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Answer: 
Wow!!!!
It looks like "Anonymous" never made more than 9999 shorts by Nikon DSLR camera.
If he will made it, he will know that after 9999 the next short # will start from 0001.

welcome to Pro "Anonymous"
May 14, 2013 by
by
Yevtitov
Watertown, MA, USA
Location : 
Watertown, MA, USA
Age: 55-65
Favorite Subject: Sports
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: More than a year
Role: Professional photographer

-2points
0out of 2found this answer helpful.
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Answer: 
It is easy. Just download your images to any PC. Your file name includes the number of pictures taken.
May 13, 2013 by
by
Anonymous

+1point
2out of 3found this answer helpful.
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Answer: 
No, you can only use 3rd party exif software or upload a photo to a shutter count website.
Mar 29, 2013 by
by
JoeR
1 person is following this questionFollow This Question
D800
 
4 Answers

Does the Nikon d800/d800e have a auto function such as the Nikon d7000?

Feb 18, 2012 by
by
The kid
Canada
 on D800
0points
5out of 10found this question helpful.
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What I mean auto function, is the camera automatically adjusters the exposure, aperture, shutter speed, iso, etc.
2 years, 2 months ago by
by
The kid
Canada
Location : 
Canada
Age: Under 18
Favorite Subject: Travel
Nikon Family: 0-1 years
Role: Occasional user, memory keeper
4 Answers

Answers

+4points
4out of 4found this answer helpful.
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Answer: 
P mode, along with auto ISO and auto focus, should be as good as any other Auto mode.
Mar 15, 2012 by
by
Anonymous

+16points
16out of 16found this answer helpful.
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Answer: 
S, A, and P modes ARE automatic.

In S mode, you pick what shutter you want and the camera picks the aperture.

In A mode you pick the aperture, and the camera picks the shutter.

In P mode you don't have to pick anything. You can hand it to a friend and it will automatically adjust the aperture and shutter.

And if you put it in Auto ISO mode, it will adjust ISO automatically, as well.

The flash is never automatic with the D800. If you want flash you pop it up and it fires.
Mar 4, 2012 by
by
Arkayem
Savannah, GA, USA
Location : 
Savannah, GA, USA
Age: 55-65
Favorite Subject: Portrait
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: Less than a month
Role: Professional photographer

-11points
1out of 13found this answer helpful.
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Answer: 
Why does nikon not put an auto function on these high end cameras? It is so hard to hand your camera to someone on vacation and tell them to point and shoot a shot of you if there is no true auto. very frustrating.
Feb 27, 2012 by
by
Anonymous

-7points
2out of 11found this answer helpful.
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Answer: 
No auto modes, they are P,S,A and M only
Feb 18, 2012 by
by
KeithD
2 people are following this questionFollow This Question
+2points
5out of 8found this question helpful.
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This is a tremendously useful feature for casual users who share this body, or for quick or emergency set-up or if the body is seldom used or hasn't been used for a while. Long a feature on Canon, it was well received on Nikon; the D7000 being one I have used. My older D700 sometimes could have used this feature.
2 years, 2 months ago by
by
art743
Favorite Subject: Portrait
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist
3 Answers

Answers

0points
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Answer: 
Yes it has these features; they are just inside the menus. It's not too difficult to change the user settings from C1 to C2 to C3 to C4 since you can tap the INFO button and select the Custom shooting blank.
Dec 4, 2013 by
by
Nikon Enthusiast
Virginia, USA
Location : 
Virginia, USA
Age: 18-24
Favorite Subject: Landscape
Nikon Family: 2-5 years
Experience: 3-6 months
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist

0points
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Answer: 
Since I do not have a camera like the D7000, I am not exactly sure what you are referring to with “U1” & “U2.” However, from what you are describing, I think it is what Nikon refers to as” Shooting Menu Banks.” The user’s manual for the D800 describes these on pages 269 and 270. They permit frequently used settings to be stored in Banks A, B, C, and D. Of course, you have to configure each Bank to your own desires.

(You can now download a “PDF” of the manual under the support section of this site.)
Mar 30, 2012 by
by
BruceH
Michigan, USA
Location : 
Michigan, USA
Age: Over 65
Favorite Subject: Travel
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist

+3points
4out of 5found this answer helpful.
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Answer: 
No U1/U2 settings
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Has staff answer
D800
 
3 Answers

Can the D800 accomodate all Nikon Tilt Shift lenses?

Feb 7, 2012 by
by
Mr Specbus
West Linn, OR, USA
 on D800
Has staff answer
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The D700 flash housing interferes with the Nikkor 24 mm tilt shift lens. Will the D800 eliminate this interference or do I need a D4?
2 years, 2 months ago by
by
Mr Specbus
West Linn, OR, USA
Location : 
West Linn, OR, USA
Favorite Subject: Travel
Nikon Family: 6-10 years
Experience: More than a year
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist
3 Answers

Answers

+1point
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Answer: 
Thanks for the feedback. I finally went to a dealer and tried the 24 mm tilt/shift on a D800. It works fine. I bought a D800E and a Nikkor 24mm tilt/shift. I have been using them happily together for several months.

Not sure what Nikon staff is thinking.
Mar 10, 2013 by
by
MrSpecbus
West Linn, OR, USA
Location : 
West Linn, OR, USA
Age: Over 65
Favorite Subject: Nature
Nikon Family: 11-20 years
Experience: 6-12 months
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist

+3points
3out of 3found this answer helpful.
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Answer: 
Actually, the answer from the Nikon staff is not quite correct. The D800 is capable of using the PCE lenses (commonly known as the Tilt Shift lenses). For the 24mm version there can be some contention of the PCE lens when being used in Portrait mode, but that is worked around very easily by rotating the lens in the opposite direction. Other than that one issue the PCE lenses from Nikon are fully compatible with the Nikon D800. Just do some research on the internet to see the number of people who blindly repeat the 'no' answer and then the few people who have actually used the PCE lenses with a D800. It is very workable and, with the great D800, it is WELL WORTH THE EFFORT.
Mar 10, 2013 by
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Jim B
Hoffman Estates, IL, USA
Location : 
Hoffman Estates, IL, USA
Age: 55-65
Favorite Subject: Landscape
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: 6-12 months
Role: Semi-professional photographer

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Answer: 
Can not be used with shifting or tilting.
Feb 27, 2012 by
by
NikonStaff
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D800
 
3 Answers

Is the mc-dc2 remote really compatible with the D800s jacks?

Feb 17, 2012 by
by
Curt G
Minneapolis, MN, USA
 on D800
-1point
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It's listed as compatible on the system page, but I don't see it working with the USB3 jack. Wish the 800 supported infrared remotes like the D4. If anything, the 800 would seem to be even more tripod prone.
2 years, 2 months ago by
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Curt G
Minneapolis, MN, USA
Location : 
Minneapolis, MN, USA
Age: 45-54
Favorite Subject: Landscape
Nikon Family: 11-20 years
Experience: Less than a month
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist
3 Answers

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Answer: 
I see Nikon has now removed the MC-dc2 from the compatible accessories list on this site. So I guess the answer is no, not compatible.
Feb 23, 2012 by
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Curt G

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Answer: 
Joe,
Thanks for responding. I should have been more specific about IR. I meant internal receiver IR using the ML-L3. Less cumbersome, better performance in cold weather and if I lose the remote fob it's cheap to replace. Still wondering about corded options though.
Feb 17, 2012 by
by
Curt G
Minneapolis, MN, USA
Location : 
Minneapolis, MN, USA
Age: 45-54
Favorite Subject: Landscape
Nikon Family: 11-20 years
Experience: Less than a month
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist

+2points
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Answer: 
D800 works with optional ML-3 infrared LED remote
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2 years, 1 month ago
by
Marvin
Bedford, OH, USA
Location : 
Bedford, OH, USA
Age: 35-44
Favorite Subject: Family & Friends
Nikon Family: 0-1 years
Experience: Less than a month
Role: Occasional user, memory keeper
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Answer: 
If you have an Express Slot, you can get a USB 3.0 adapter.

1 LAC 130976 LaCie 130976 USB 3.0 ExpressCard/34 Notebook Expansion Card
Mar 31, 2012 by
by
Anonymous
Favorite Subject: Landscape
Nikon Family: 6-10 years
Experience: Less than a month
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist

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Answer: 
If you are concerned that you would not be able to interface with the USB 2.0, here's the answer from the Nikon D800 brochure:

"High-speed data transfer with USB 3.0

For a more productive tethered and transfer workflow, the
D800 is compatible with USB 3.0. When connected to
equipment featuring USB 2.0, speed is reduced to that of
USB 2.0."
Mar 4, 2012 by
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BruceH
Michigan, USA
Location : 
Michigan, USA
Age: Over 65
Favorite Subject: Travel
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: Less than a month
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist

-3points
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Answer: 
Mac currently does not support usb 3.0 so you are out of luck, thunderbolt is the current high speed data transfer for mac's
Mar 4, 2012 by
by
KeithD
1 person is following this questionFollow This Question
Has staff answer
D800
 
3 Answers

Image Quality in DX Mode vs D7000?

Mar 9, 2012 by
by
Tbaker
Watertown, NY 13601, USA
 on D800
Has staff answer
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I own a D7000 and I was wondering if I should expect a noticeable or significant image quality difference with the D800? I shoot a lot of wildlife with a Sigma 150-500 and comparing the tech specs from the D7000/D800 in DX mode, I see that the pixel rating is slightly better with the D7000. I understand it isn't all about the pixels and has a lot to do with the sensor... Should I expect any noticeable improvement in sharpness/detail with D800 using the Sigma - all other things being equal? Thanks...
2 years, 1 month ago
by
Tbaker
Watertown, NY 13601, USA
Location : 
Watertown, NY 13601, USA
Age: 45-54
Favorite Subject: Nature
Nikon Family: 2-5 years
Experience: Less than a month
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist
3 Answers

Answers

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Answer: 
I own both the D800 and the D7000. In DX crop mode I have found that the D800 is noticeably better than the D7000. Images are slightly sharper, there is a bit more dynamic range and more discerning colour rendition....not a huge difference but noticeable, especially with larger size prints. I shoot birds with a Nikkor 70-200 f/4 VR with a TC-17E teleconverter. I did select specific lenses that score quite well on DxOMark testing with the D800. Other lenses may not provide good enough optics and may limit overall image quality.

I can't comment on the Sigma 150-500 as DxOMark has not tested that particular lens. The Sigma 120-400 does not score very well at all with either the D7000 or the D800. If the optics of your lens are not up to the challenge of the D800 you will likely not see any difference as your lens may be the weakest part of the system and there may not be any point in upgrading to the D800 if you have poor/average glass.
Aug 6, 2013 by
by
Grimbot
Grimsby, ON, Canada
Location : 
Grimsby, ON, Canada
Age: 55-65
Favorite Subject: Landscape
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: 1-3 months
Role: Semi-professional photographer

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Answer: 
If the Nikon answer to this question is correct in reference to quality being the same between the D7000 and D800 in crop mode, we are in a world of hurt. I own the D7000 and D700. I will not shoot pass ISO 400 on the D7000 for quality images for clients. On the D700, I can shoot up to ISO 1600 before I get concerned about the quality of images I give the client. Other Nikon staff states that the D800 image quality is on par with the D700. The Nikon response to this question states the D800 is on par with the D7000 in crop mode. Crop mode should only affect image resolution not quality.
Mar 15, 2012 by
by
Anonymous

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Answer: 
You can expect same quality between the D7000 and the D800 (full frame camera) in DX crop mode. Regarding the results using a third party product you will need to get in contact with them regarding sharpeness and details.
Mar 13, 2012 by
by
NikonStaff
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