Loading

Light and compact ‘walk-around’ lens with Vibration Reduction

With its versatile 18–55mm focal range and VR (Vibration Reduction) image stabilization, this lens makes it easy to create sharp, clear photos and videos. Remarkably light and compact, it’s an ideal general purpose ‘walk-around’ lens. It even captures fantastic close-up shots as close as 0.9-ft. from your subject.
Vibration Reduction
Silent Wave Motor
AS
A-M

Versatile enough for any setting

3x standard zoom with Vibration Reduction

Optimized for Nikon DX-format D-SLRs, the practical and versatile AF-S DX NIKKOR 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6G VR was designed to cover the most frequently used focal length range of 18–55mm. It’s great for a very broad range of photo and video applications, from portraits to landscapes. Nikon VR (Vibration Reduction) image stabilization provides 3.0 stops* of blur free handheld shooting, ensures that all your shots turn out remarkably crisp, even when handheld shooting.

Sharp, clear images

Nikon technology for optimum performance

Like all NIKKOR lenses, the AF-S DX NIKKOR 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6G VR is engineered for performance. Nikon’s Super Integrated Coating (SIC) offers superior color quality and reduces ghosting and flare. A rounded, seven-blade diaphragm makes out of focus elements appear more natural, and a hybrid aspherical lens element minimizes various types of lens aberration. Expect vibrant, clear images and videos.

Nikon Vibration Reduction

Learn more about Nikon’s in-lens VR image stabilization which assures dramatically sharper still images and video capture when shooting handheld.
*Based on CIPA Standard. This value is achieved when: DX-format lenses are attached to a DX-format digital SLR camera and zoom lenses are set at the maximum telephoto position.
Vibration Reduction
Vibration Reduction
A Nikon in-lens technology that improves image stability by automatically compensating for camera shake. Lenses that offer VR will feature the abbreviation VR on the lens barrel.
Silent Wave Motor
Silent Wave Motor
AF-S NIKKOR lenses feature Nikon’s Silent Wave Motor, which represents a significant advance in AF lens technology.
AS
AS
AS stands for Aspherical lens elements. This type of lens utilizes non-spherical surfaces on either one or both sides of the glass in order to eliminate certain types of lens aberration.
A-M
A-M
A-M stands for Auto-Manual Mode. Thanks to a mechanism incorporated in the lens barrel, smooth focusing operation in Manual focus mode is realized in the same way as users have become accustomed to with conventional manual-focus lenses by adding an appropriate torque to the focus ring.
AF-S DX NIKKOR 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6G VR 4 5 130 130
Excellent General Use Lens We use this particular lens on most occasions. It gives consistent quality with minimum distortion throughout the entire range. It covers most shooting situation. It is relatively inexpensive which allow us to use it with the children without worries that they may damage the lens. We highly recommended it for daily general use. July 30, 2010
Better than the rest After using a ultra zoom point and shoot from one of the other competitors i made the choice to join the DSLR crowd because of the versitile options such as with lens & filters. Not to mention the ability to be a little more creative with photos being able to manually focus e.t.c. This lens came with the D3000 as a kit purchase and have so far found it to a great starter lens. I do fully plan on buying a couple more lenses in the near future. July 30, 2010
Good general purpose lens. This is a decent lens for a newbie to the D-SLR series of cameras. It is a great general purpose lens. July 30, 2010
Great all-purpose lens This is the 'kit' lens that came with my D5000 dSLR. It is a very good, versatile basic lens. Images are sharp and clear, and the zoom range really adds to it being the primary lens I keep on my camera. Not the fastest lens around, but a solid and dependable everyday mount. Anyone who views my photos says "wow, your camera takes really nice pictures!" No credit to the photographer, just to the camera! July 30, 2010
Great lens for everyday photos This is usually a standard kit lens for entry level SLR's from Nikon. I should say it very good for all levels of general photography. If you are using a D60 or D3000, its a little tricky in low light conditions, since the same CMOS sensor is used to create more megapixles that the older D40, these cameras will need slightly more shutter time to capture during low light conditions resulting blurs if not using a tripod. One con of this lens is if you are using the 50-55mm range too much, then you need the second lens set whics is the same lens with 55-200mm zoom on it. The reason is this lens can use the F 3.5 only when its at 18mm. In other words if you are using the zoom and set your lens at 55mm, the F goes up to 5.6 which will require more shutter time to capture a good image. In short this is a great lens for outdoors and general photography. As said one advice is to buy the 55-200mm lens wuith this one as well so you can have lower F when shooting in the 50mm ranges. July 30, 2010
Page: 2 3 4 5 6
<<prev
54 Questions | 85 Answers

Product Q&A

Ask your questions. Share your answers.

 
 
Clear Search
 
 
54 Questions | 85 Answers
All Questions
Page: 2 3
next>>
Sort by:
Has staff answer
Has expert answer
AF-S DX NIKKOR 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6G VR
 
8 Answers

Vr-VrII

Nov 16, 2013 by
by
Ravnendano
Maribo. Dk
Has staff answer
Has expert answer
-1point
0out of 1found this question helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful0unhelpful1
how can I find out if a lens has VR or VR II? seems not always been so good to write it in your spec.
11 months ago
by
Ravnendano
Maribo. Dk
Location : 
Maribo. Dk
Age: 35-44
Favorite Subject: Family & Friends
Nikon Family: 0-1 years
Experience: 1-3 months
Role: Occasional user, memory keeper
8 Answers

Answers

0points
0out of 0found this answer helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful0unhelpful0
Answer: 
The AF-S DX NIKKOR 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6G VR Lens is VR, not VRII. The only way to confirm definitely if a lens is VR or VRII is to check the product specifications. Gold lettering may indicate either VR or VRII.
Nov 26, 2013 by
by
NikonCatherine
New York

0points
0out of 0found this answer helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful0unhelpful0
Answer: 
this means that all lenses with gold VR is a VR II. This means also that there are only 4 nikon lenses out of the 26 there have VR and 24 with VR II. if I understand right!
Nov 18, 2013 by
by
Ravnendano

0points
0out of 0found this answer helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful0unhelpful0
Answer: 
Here is the 200mm with VRII notice the VR in gold

http://www.nikonusa.com/en/Nikon-Products/Product/Camera-Lenses/2188/AF-S-NIKKOR-200mm-f%252F2G-ED-VR-II.html
Here is the 200mm with VR notice the VR in red
http://www.nikonusa.com/en/Nikon-Products/Product-Archive/Camera-Lenses/2150/AF-S-VR-NIKKOR-200mm-f%252F2G-IF-ED.html
Definitely not wrong.
Nov 17, 2013 by
by
JoeR

0points
0out of 0found this answer helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful0unhelpful0
Answer: 
Any lens made by nikon have an id , name or something else .
ED , VR , IF , AF and ... so on .
If a lens have Vibration Reduction , you can see VR lable on the lens body and in its name like AF-S DX NIKKOR 18-55 f/3.5.5.6G VR or AF-S NIKKOR 600mm f/4G ED VR II
Nov 17, 2013 by
by
HamidJ

0points
0out of 0found this answer helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful0unhelpful0
Answer: 
No visual way of telling unless it is a lens that originally had VR and was updated to VR II. In that instance the VR printed on the lens would be red and the one with VR II would be gold.
Nov 17, 2013 by
by
JoeR

0points
0out of 0found this answer helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful0unhelpful0
Answer: 
Thanks for the replies, but I still have a question that is not answered! how can the lens see if it is a VR or VR II. Is there anything on the side of the lens which indicate this? or are all new lenses with VR II?
Nov 17, 2013 by
by
Ravnendano

+1point
1out of 1found this answer helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful1unhelpful0
Answer: 
Read this :
http://imaging.nikon.com/lineup/lens/zoom/normalzoom/af-s_dx_18-55mmf_35-56g_vr/
Then this :
http://www.nikon.com/about/technology/rd/core/software/vr_e/index.htm
First article shows the lens having 3 stopsS of VR, second article shows VR I I gives 4 stops therefore the lens has VR.

-1point
0out of 1found this answer helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful0unhelpful1
Answer: 
VR , up up 3 stops.
Nov 16, 2013 by
by
JoeR
2 people are following this questionFollow This Question
Has staff answer
AF-S DX NIKKOR 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6G VR
 
4 Answers

Whats the difference between this two lense?

Jun 20, 2011 by
Has staff answer
0points
0out of 0found this question helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful0unhelpful0
I am thinking to buy a lens of range 50mm and I have chosen this lens and AF-S NIKKOR 50mm f/1.8G but i'm confused which one should i go for,what's the main difference between these two lenses?
3 years, 4 months ago by
by
Anonymous
4 Answers

Answers

0points
0out of 0found this answer helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful0unhelpful0
Answer: 
  Keep in mind that 50mm is only the “standard” focal length for 35mm film cameras, or for digital cameras that use a sensor of the same size as a standard 35mm frame.  A few of Nikon's higher-end DSLRs use this format (Nikon calls it “FX format”), but most use the smaller APS format (or “DX format”, as Nikon calls it).

  The “standard” focal length for an APS-format camera is about 35mm.  As a rough rule, you can divide any lens focal length for a 35mm camera by about 1.55 to calculate what the comparable focal length would be for a lens to get the same field of view on an APS/DX camera; or multiply a lens focal length for an APS/DX camera by 1.55 to compute what the comparable lens would be for a 35mm/FX camera.

  Note, also, that many lenses are now being made specifically for APS/DX format cameras, being designed only to cover that frame size, and while these lenses will mount on a 35mm/FX camera, they will not cover the full frame.  The “DX” designation as part of the name of a Nikon lens identifies it as such a lens.

  Though I've been doing a lot of experimenting with the old lenses that I have for my forty-year-old F2, mounting them on my D3200, it is just now that I thought to try the opposite.  I just now mounted my AF-S DX NIKKOR 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6G VR on my F2, and fiddled with it while looking through the viewfinder.  It appears that it actually does cover the full frame, as long as it is set to a focal length of about 24mm or longer.  As I zoom out to shorter focal lengths than that, it cuts off the sides of the frame.
Sep 14, 2013 by
by
Bob
N38°29' W121°26' (Rounded to nearest minutes)
Location : 
N38°29' W121°26' (Rounded to nearest minutes)
Age: 45-54
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: Less than a month
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist

0points
0out of 0found this answer helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful0unhelpful0
Answer: 
A straight 50mm is as close to what the human eye sees. I find that I am trying to get more into the picture that the straight 50mm will not let me. The 18-55mm will allow this and still give you the 50mm only if you want it. More versatile.
Jul 26, 2011 by
by
Anonymous
Age: 45-54
Favorite Subject: Landscape
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: 1-3 months
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist

+1point
1out of 1found this answer helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful1unhelpful0
Answer: 
this one is a general basic zoom that lets you take pictures from the ultrawide (18mm) to the moderate tele (55mm) end. however, its max aperture is varied (gets worse by longer focal length) so it's nowhere near as bright at 50mm (5.6) as the 50/1.8. the latter lens is a fixed focal length lens (a so-called prime) where the zoom is your legs, but due to its brightness and large aperture it's better suited for low-light scenarios and when you need a shallow depth of field - nice subject/background separation.
Jun 21, 2011 by
by
AndrsK

0points
0out of 0found this answer helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful0unhelpful0
Answer: 
Please visit the lens page in our website, so you will get acquainted with the different type of lenses that we offer.
http://www.nikonusa.com/Nikon-Produ...
Jun 20, 2011 by
by
NikonStaff
2 people are following this questionFollow This Question
Has staff answer
AF-S DX NIKKOR 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6G VR
 
4 Answers

Manual focus with lens in auto mode?

May 30, 2012 by
Has staff answer
-1point
0out of 1found this question helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful0unhelpful1
Is it harmful to turn the focus ring with the lens set to auto (not while focusing is actually taking place, but in standby while in auto)? Any symptoms if damage has been done? Sometimes is slow to focus, but may be normal...
2 years, 4 months ago by
by
Joe
4 Answers

Answers

0points
0out of 0found this answer helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful0unhelpful0
Answer: 
I have this lens, the kit lens I got with my Nikon D5000, and I have been wondering about this also, because J.D. Thomas ("Nikon D5000 Digital Field Guide," p. 6), says: "Rotating the focus ring while the lens is set to autofocus can damage your lens." But David Busch ("Nikon D5000", p. 60) refers to the focus ring as used to "fine-tune autofocus adjustment," which would suggest that when you autofocus you can adjust further manually. That is something that is possible with another DSLR I have. The answer from the "Nikon staff" indicates that it is harmful. It seems peculiar that the D5000 manual does not mention this danger.
Jul 22, 2012 by
by
Anonymous
Colorado USA
Location : 
Colorado USA
Age: Over 65
Favorite Subject: Nature
Nikon Family: 2-5 years
Experience: More than a year
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist

0points
0out of 0found this answer helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful0unhelpful0
Answer: 
To recap, the lens wasn't actually focusing at the time. The ring was moved gently with the switch set to "A", but it was in standby. Seems fine, just takes a second to focus (may be normal, don't know)...

To those at Nikon, what would be the symptoms if damage had been done?
Jun 1, 2012 by
by
Joe

0points
0out of 0found this answer helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful0unhelpful0
Answer: 
You shouldn't try to manual focus while the lense is autofocusing because the lense uses a silent motor that is controlled by the camera. It sounds like you may have damaged the lense.
Jun 1, 2012 by
by
Anonymous
Age: 35-44
Nikon Family: 2-5 years
Experience: More than a year
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist

+1point
1out of 1found this answer helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful1unhelpful0
Answer: 
These lenses have a switch that you can use it in manual or in Autofocus. If the lens is in A you're going to force the mechanism and may damage the lens.
May 31, 2012 by
by
NikonStaff
1 person is following this questionFollow This Question
Has staff answer
AF-S DX NIKKOR 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6G VR
 
3 Answers

does Nikon 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6G VR AF-S DX Nikkor Lens compatible with Nikon D5100?

Jul 29, 2011 by
Has staff answer
-2points
0out of 2found this question helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful0unhelpful2
3 years, 2 months ago by
by
flavia
miami
Location : 
miami
Age: 35-44
Favorite Subject: Family & Friends
Nikon Family: 0-1 years
Experience: 1-3 months
Role: Just getting started with photography
3 Answers

Answers

+1point
1out of 1found this answer helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful1unhelpful0
Answer: 
yes it can.
Aug 5, 2011 by
by
HeyThatPhotoGuy!

0points
0out of 0found this answer helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful0unhelpful0
Answer: 
Yes it is.
Jul 29, 2011 by
by
KeithD

+2points
2out of 2found this answer helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful2unhelpful0
Answer: 
Yes, this lens is compatible with the D5100.
Jul 29, 2011 by
by
NikonStaff
2 people are following this questionFollow This Question
Has staff answer
Has expert answer
AF-S DX NIKKOR 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6G VR
 
3 Answers

Photographing the Northern Lights--Infinity Focus or something comparable?

Feb 17, 2013 by
Has staff answer
Has expert answer
0points
0out of 0found this question helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful0unhelpful0
My understanding is it is not possible to focus to infinity using this lens and there is no infinity marker. Is there another way to focus to infinity?

I bought the D5000 camera which came with the Nikon DX Nikkor AF-S 18-55mm 1:3.5-5.6G lens. On two prior trips to see the northern lights I was able to focus on the moon; however this time the moon was not up and though I attempted to focus on a distant light on a highway (the only light source around), my photos of the northern lights were almost all out of focus.

I was using a tripod and manual settings, with the focus switch set to manual. ISO, aperture and shutter speeds varied, depending on the lights (as they did on the prior two trips); the only major difference this time was not being able to use the moon to focus prior to the lights appearing (I stayed at the same location each time, so conditions were the same).

Thanks for any info.
1 year, 8 months ago
by
CJ
Arizona, USA
Location : 
Arizona, USA
Nikon Family: 2-5 years
Experience: More than a year
Role: Occasional user, memory keeper
3 Answers

Answers

0points
0out of 0found this answer helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful0unhelpful0
Answer: 
  I have figured out a way to get this lens to focus at infinity, and stay there.  This is with a D3200 body; the instructions may not apply fully—or even at all—to a different body.

  First with the camera set to autofocus, select a very distant object (far enough to be “infinity” as far as the lens is concerned), point the camera at it, and press the shutter button halfway, to get the camera to focus on that object.

  Make sure the camera is displaying the “Info” display.  If it isn't, press the “Information” button that is just behind the shutter release.

  Next, press the “Information Edit” button at the lower left of the back of the camera.  (Not to be confused with the “Information” button just behind the shutter release.)

  Use the four-way “Multi Selector” to scroll to the autofocus mode setting.  This will be the field that currently shows something starting with “AF-”.  Change this setting to “M” (manual).

  The lens' focus is now set and locked at infinity, and will remain so until either the camera is set back to an autofocus mode, or until the lens' focus mode switch is set to “M”.

  I was puzzled when I first discovered this “M” setting.  It didn't appear to do anything but disable autofocus, leaving the lens' focus stuck wherever it was last focused.  As it happens, that is exactly what we want to do in this case.  With the lens' focus mode switch set to “A”, the focus ring is locked, and will not be turned manually (not unless you apply enough force to damage the focus mechanism, but we do not want to do that).  With the camera's focus mode set to “M”, it won't try to autofocus.  So the lens will stay focused as it was set in the first step above, at infinity.

  As it happens, the “M” setting on the camera anticipates a feature that some other lenses might implement—but which this one does not—whereby selecting this mode from the camera will unlock the manual focus ring, even if the lens' own setting is left on autofocus.  With this lens, it just leaves the lens' focus set and locked to wherever it was last set—not what Nikon intended, but useful in this case.
 
Products related to my answer
 
Sep 16, 2013 by
by
Bob
N38°29' W121°26' (Rounded to nearest minutes)
Location : 
N38°29' W121°26' (Rounded to nearest minutes)
Age: 45-54
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: Less than a month
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist

0points
0out of 0found this answer helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful0unhelpful0
Answer: 
  It does seem to be an unfortunate thing about these modern cameras and lenses that are meant to work automatically, that while they provide some ability to operate them manually, manual operation does not work nearly as well with them as it would on a more primitive camera/lens that is intended to be operated manually.

  In particular, one thing I have noticed about this lens is that while you can manually focus it, it is imprecise and unmarked.  Any other lens, if I turn the focus all the way in the infinity direction until it stops, it is at infinity.  This lens, on the other hand, will actually focus past infinity; taking you to a hyperopic setting where nothing will be in focus.  To focus it manually at infinity requires the same guesswork as focusing it at any other shorter distance.

  Short of buying a suitable manual-focus lens, the best advice I can offer is to try to focus on something like the moon or a distant light, and try to use as small an aperture as you reasonably can, to give yourself some reasonable room to be imprecise with your focusing.
Sep 14, 2013 by
by
Bob
N38°29' W121°26' (Rounded to nearest minutes)
Location : 
N38°29' W121°26' (Rounded to nearest minutes)
Age: 45-54
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: Less than a month
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist

0points
0out of 0found this answer helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful0unhelpful0
Answer: 
Unfortunately, the 18-55 lens does not have an infinity marker, and we do not support any other method of manually focusing the 18-55 lens at infinity. It is always best to use the right tools for the job, especially in photography. It would be best to purchase a lens with an infinity marker.
Sep 11, 2013 by
by
NikonLaurence
New York
1 person is following this questionFollow This Question
Has staff answer
Has expert answer
AF-S DX NIKKOR 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6G VR
 
3 Answers

Is this lens compatible with a D50?

Aug 29, 2014 by
by
Dhay
Stuart, FL, USA
Has staff answer
Has expert answer
0points
0out of 0found this question helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful0unhelpful0
1 month, 3 weeks ago
by
Dhay
Stuart, FL, USA
Location : 
Stuart, FL, USA
Age: 25-34
Favorite Subject: Landscape
Nikon Family: 2-5 years
Experience: More than a year
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist
3 Answers

Answers

+1point
1out of 1found this answer helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful1unhelpful0
Answer: 
The AF-S DX NIKKOR 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6G VR. The AF-S DX NIKKOR 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6G VR is remarkably light and compact, it’s an ideal general purpose ‘walk-around’ lens. It even captures fantastic close-up shots as close as 0.9-ft. from your subject. For more information on which lenses to use with your D50 please see: https://support.nikonusa.com/app/an...
Aug 29, 2014 by
by
Nikon_Chelsea
New York

+1point
1out of 1found this answer helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful1unhelpful0
Answer: 
Fully compatible
Aug 29, 2014 by
by
JoeR

+1point
1out of 1found this answer helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful1unhelpful0
Answer: 
Yes it is
Aug 29, 2014 by
by
KeithD
1 person is following this questionFollow This Question
0points
0out of 0found this question helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful0unhelpful0
3 years, 4 months ago by
by
todd
nyc
Location : 
nyc
Age: 35-44
Favorite Subject: Sports
Nikon Family: 2-5 years
Role: Just getting started with photography
2 Answers

Answers

0points
0out of 0found this answer helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful0unhelpful0
Answer: 
Teleconverters interfere with the calibrated engineering of the lens as well as losing your auto-focus ability in most cases. I professionally would not recommend using teleconverters.
Jun 1, 2011 by
by
Nicky Nikon
Baltimore, MD
Location : 
Baltimore, MD
Age: 25-34
Favorite Subject: Landscape
Nikon Family: 2-5 years
Experience: More than a year
Role: Professional photographer

+1point
1out of 1found this answer helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful1unhelpful0
Answer: 
No, tc's will not work on either lens.
May 30, 2011 by
by
KeithD
1 person is following this questionFollow This Question
Has staff answer
AF-S DX NIKKOR 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6G VR
 
2 Answers

F-stop

May 29, 2011 by
Has staff answer
0points
0out of 0found this question helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful0unhelpful0
My f stop is stuck at 22 for some reason and I can't adjust it, any suggestions?
3 years, 4 months ago by
by
J
NY
Location : 
NY
Age: 25-34
Favorite Subject: Family & Friends
Nikon Family: 0-1 years
Experience: 3-6 months
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist
2 Answers

Answers

+1point
1out of 1found this answer helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful1unhelpful0
Answer: 
You can only adjust the aperture in Aperture Priority or manual modes. It doesn't have an aperture ring like the D series because all changing in done inside of the camera modes. If you are saying that while you are in one of those modes that the aperture is not able to be adjusted and you suspect it is the lens, send it to Nikon so it can be checked.
May 31, 2011 by
by
Nicky Nikon
Baltimore, MD
Location : 
Baltimore, MD
Age: 25-34
Favorite Subject: Landscape
Nikon Family: 2-5 years
Experience: More than a year
Role: Professional photographer

0points
0out of 0found this answer helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful0unhelpful0
Answer: 
In order to better assist you, please click on the link below:
Answer Title: How to ask or update a Technical Support question
Answer Link: http://support.nikonusa.com/app/ans...
May 31, 2011 by
by
NikonStaff
1 person is following this questionFollow This Question
Has staff answer
AF-S DX NIKKOR 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6G VR
 
2 Answers

Nikon D60 with Nikon DX AF-S NIKKOR 18-55mm 1:3.5-5.6 G

May 30, 2011 by
by
Jnichols
Oklahoma
Has staff answer
0points
0out of 0found this question helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful0unhelpful0
When I zoom, the lens will not go passed 35. Help Please
3 years, 4 months ago by
by
Jnichols
Oklahoma
Location : 
Oklahoma
Age: 25-34
Favorite Subject: Family & Friends
Nikon Family: 2-5 years
Experience: More than a year
Role: Just getting started with photography
2 Answers

Answers

0points
0out of 0found this answer helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful0unhelpful0
Answer: 
If the lens wont zoom past 35mm, it needs to be checked by Nikon Tech support. Dont attempt to check it yourself as your warranty will be voided.
May 31, 2011 by
by
Nicky Nikon
Baltimore, MD
Location : 
Baltimore, MD
Age: 25-34
Favorite Subject: Landscape
Nikon Family: 2-5 years
Experience: More than a year
Role: Professional photographer

0points
0out of 0found this answer helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful0unhelpful0
Answer: 
You will need to send your lens for service in order to be evaluated by one of our techs.
Title: How do I get my Nikon product serviced?
URL: http://support.nikontech.com/cgi-bi...
May 31, 2011 by
by
NikonStaff
1 person is following this questionFollow This Question
Has staff answer
AF-S DX NIKKOR 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6G VR
 
2 Answers

why the photos are not focuses?

Aug 22, 2011 by
Has staff answer
0points
0out of 0found this question helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful0unhelpful0
hy, i bought a nikon D3100 with kit lens 18-55mm. now after a few month i saw that when i shoot picture in less then 1/300 shutter speed, all my picture are not focused. the camera capture the focus, i do the picture, but when i look the photo is not clear. i try also to do picture with the tripod and remote control( for not shaken the camera) but same result. all the picture made in less then 1/300 are not crystal. what i should do? thank you
Sample Photos & Videos
User submitted photo
User submitted photo
3 years, 1 month ago
by
Lorand
Montreal
Location : 
Montreal
Age: 25-34
Favorite Subject: Nature
Nikon Family: 0-1 years
Experience: 6-12 months
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist
2 Answers

Answers

0points
0out of 0found this answer helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful0unhelpful0
Answer: 
are you using the tele end? are you using the VR in the lens? but, most important, ARE YOU USING LIVE VIEW? tips: turn on VR. don't use live view for photos. and choose your focus point wisely, first focus then reframe.
Aug 24, 2011 by
by
AndrsK

+1point
1out of 1found this answer helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful1unhelpful0
Answer: 
For better assistance, please click on the link below in order for you to send sample images:
Answer Title: How to ask or update a Technical Support question
Answer Link: http://support.nikonusa.com/app/ans...
Aug 22, 2011 by
by
NikonStaff
2 people are following this questionFollow This Question
Page: 2 3
next>>
Page: 2 3
next>>

Product Registration

Registering your Nikon product allows us to send you (with your permission) important updates, service information and helpful hints, and it makes it easier should you ever need to call in for help.
Register your product online now.

Nikon Answers Site

We store all resolved problems in our solution database. If you can’t find a relevant answer, feel free to submit a question to our technical support team.
View Questions & Answers