Loading

Affordable, fast f/1.8 prime lens with manual aperture control.

Offering natural image rendering and exceptional sharpness, the AF NIKKOR 50mm f/1.8D is a versatile, affordable prime lens. Extremely compact and lightweight—it weighs approximately 5.5 oz (155 g)— making it a convenient carry-around lens for nearly any shooting opportunity. Its aperture control ring enables smooth manual adjustments during Live View shooting, making it a great video partner, too.
Super Integrated Coating

The precision of a prime lens

Natural, exceptionally sharp images

The AF NIKKOR 50mm f/1.8D is as versatile as it is compact—perfect for travel, portraits and general photography. Its fast f/1.8 maxium aperture creates an attractive natural background blur (bokeh) and enables great low-light shooting. Produce consistently stunning visuals, indoors or out.

Performance in any light

Fast enough for low-light shooting

The AF NIKKOR 50mm f/1.8D is fast enough for shooting in most lighting situations without a flash—from dusk and dawn to dim indoor lighting. Its aperture control ring allows for manual adjustments during Live View shooting. Broaden your shooting opportunities.
Super Integrated Coating
Super Integrated Coating
Nikon Super Integrated Coating is Nikon's term for its multilayer coating of the optical elements in NIKKOR lenses.
AF Nikkor 50mm f/1.8D 4.7 5 157 157
"Hot spot" aberrations at apertures lower than f/11 - please, please, do not purchase this lens. Research it first. When a customer purchases a lens from Nikon, it is generally assumed that the product will meet the highest standards of quality and dependability. This is why I was so surprised to discover a "purple spot", or "pale blue dot" visible at lower apertures on the AF Nikkor 50 mm 1.8 D. After a great deal of trial and error, trouble shooting, and wasted money cleaning the thing, I learned, to the best of my knowledge, the purple spot is presumably caused by light bouncing off the sensor, back on the rear element lens, and back on the sensor (no, this is not glare, it is not a lens flare, or dirty lens- you can literally detect this problem from a brand new lens, fresh out of the box at a camera store). This design flaw renders the lens functionally useless at apertures lower than F11. Simply search "pale purple dot, AF Nikkor 50mm 1.8D" on the internet to see what I mean. Nikon should recall the product with the intent on discovering if this aberration represents a manufacturing error in a limited batch of AF Nikkor 50mm f/1.8D lenses or a larger problem, and then they should fix it. When I contacted Nikon about this, they were very respectful, but have not recognized or admitted to this common problem (to my knowledge). If you are even considering purchasing this lens, try it before you buy it. July 30, 2014
Would like to return Thought the lens would be workable,not so. Rough fit attaching to bayonet mount on my D80,I own four other nikon lenses and never had a problem, tried three times always difficult, I'm scared the lens will damage the recieving end of cameras CPU mount , I upgrade my cameras every couple of years, My first nikon was an EM . I bought the lens in St Martens DA and I live in Canada and the cost of shipping it back/refund is not cost effective. A waste of $140.00CAN June 9, 2011
Page: 3 4 5 6 7
<<prev
120 Questions | 199 Answers

Product Q&A

Ask your questions. Share your answers.

 
 
Clear Search
 
 
120 Questions | 199 Answers
All Questions
Page: 2 3 4 5
next>>
Sort by:
Has staff answer
AF Nikkor 50mm f/1.8D
 
7 Answers

I recently purchased the Nikor 50mm f/1.8 lens. Why am I unable to shoot in all modes, using settings other than aperature at 1.8?

Mar 22, 2011 by
by
Trina
Southeast Michigan
Has staff answer
+19points
25out of 31found this question helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful25unhelpful6
I've noticed a blinking FEE on my screen.
3 years, 8 months ago by
by
Trina
Southeast Michigan
Location : 
Southeast Michigan
Age: 45-54
Favorite Subject: Portrait
Nikon Family: 0-1 years
Experience: 1-3 months
Role: Just getting started with photography
7 Answers

Answers

+4points
5out of 6found this answer helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful5unhelpful1
Answer: 
you need to set the aperture ring to the largest number which i thin is 22. if u dont have at least a d 90. this lens will not autofocus.. d 5200 and down wil be manual focus only.

+5points
7out of 9found this answer helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful7unhelpful2
Answer: 
Turn the aperture ring on the lens to f/22 and move the lock switch (orange color) so the ring won't turn by accident.
Apr 15, 2011 by
by
Nino N.
Stevens Point, WI
Location : 
Stevens Point, WI
Age: 18-24
Favorite Subject: Portrait
Nikon Family: 2-5 years
Experience: More than a year
Role: Semi-professional photographer

+7points
7out of 7found this answer helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful7unhelpful0
Answer: 
Have you moved the aperture ring to 22 and locked the orange switch (near the 2.8 mark) to allow camera adjustment of the aperture?

+5points
5out of 5found this answer helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful5unhelpful0
Answer: 
that's becasue you don't have the aperture ring set for auto exposure control. I had the same problem and I noticed the ring was not set where the orange mark was in the auto position. Play with that.
Apr 14, 2011 by
by
mike4mula
San Diego
Location : 
San Diego
Age: 55-65
Favorite Subject: Travel
Nikon Family: 2-5 years
Experience: 6-12 months
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist

+1point
1out of 1found this answer helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful1unhelpful0
Answer: 
It's been awhile since I play with this lens but check to make sure the F/Stop Ring lock is set to the opposite of whatever you have it at currently. You should see a little latch that pushes up to unlock and down to the orange mark to lock. Good luck and hope that works.
 
Products related to my answer
 
Apr 14, 2011 by
by
MDCSF
San Francisco
Location : 
San Francisco
Age: 25-34
Favorite Subject: Nature
Nikon Family: 2-5 years
Experience: More than a year
Role: Semi-professional photographer

-1point
0out of 1found this answer helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful0unhelpful1
Answer: 
Make sure that you set the lens itself to its smallest opening when you mount it on the camera.
Apr 11, 2011 by
by
PhotoDeacon
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: More than a year
Role: Semi-professional photographer

-2points
6out of 14found this answer helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful6unhelpful8
Answer: 
FEE means that the lens aperture ring is not set to minimum aperture. You need to set the ring to minimum aperture (largest f-number).
Mar 24, 2011 by
by
NikonStaff
3 people are following this questionFollow This Question
AF Nikkor 50mm f/1.8D
 
6 Answers

Will this lens autofocus on a Nikon D7000?

Mar 10, 2011 by
by
Renee487
Sydney
+18points
19out of 20found this question helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful19unhelpful1
3 years, 9 months ago by
by
Renee487
Sydney
6 Answers

Answers

0points
0out of 0found this answer helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful0unhelpful0
Answer: 
Yes, it works on my D7000
Jun 11, 2014 by
by
Example: NikonPro. For privacy reasons, do not use your full name or email address

+8points
8out of 8found this answer helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful8unhelpful0
Answer: 
Yes. It will do so quickly and quietly. My experience is that it will also do it accurately (but I've not run any precise tests). Follow the D7000 manual's instructions for AF and lens changes and you shouldn't have any problems. My D7000 and f/1.8 D lens combination autofocuses better and more rapidly than any of my kit lenses.
May 30, 2011 by
by
montanaShooter
annapolis, MD
Location : 
annapolis, MD
Age: 55-65
Favorite Subject: Landscape
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: 3-6 months
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist

+8points
8out of 8found this answer helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful8unhelpful0
Answer: 
Absolutely. Great lens, I use it on my D90 without a problem and with great results. It is a standard D type lens. All D7000 camera functions are supported with D type and G type lenses.

+3points
5out of 7found this answer helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful5unhelpful2
Answer: 
Yes.
See Compatible Lenses for your D7000:
AF-NIKKOR for F3AF not supported
AI-P NIKKOR: All functions supported except 3D color matrix metering II
DX AF NIKKOR: All functions possible
Electronic rangefinder can be used if maximum aperture is f/5.6 or faster
IX Nikkor lenses cannot be used
Non-CPU: Can be used in modes A and M; color matrix metering and aperture value display supported if user provides lens data (AI lenses only)
Other AF NIKKOR: All functions supported except 3D color matrix metering II
PC Micro-NIKKOR does not support some functions
Type G or D AF NIKKOR: All functions supported
Apr 14, 2011 by
by
MDCSF
San Francisco
Location : 
San Francisco
Age: 25-34
Favorite Subject: Nature
Nikon Family: 2-5 years
Experience: More than a year
Role: Semi-professional photographer

+6points
6out of 6found this answer helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful6unhelpful0
Answer: 
This lens will autofocus on Nikon 7000, because Nikon 7000 have internal AF motor.
Mar 11, 2011 by
by
Yevgen
Watertown, MA, 02472
Location : 
Watertown, MA, 02472
Age: 55-65
Favorite Subject: Sports
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: More than a year
Role: Professional photographer

+4points
4out of 4found this answer helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful4unhelpful0
Answer: 
Yes. I own the D7000, and it performs perfectly as expected.
Mar 10, 2011 by
by
Dodd
Provo, UT
Location : 
Provo, UT
Age: 55-65
Favorite Subject: Portrait
Nikon Family: 11-20 years
Experience: Less than a month
Role: Semi-professional photographer
1 person is following this questionFollow This Question
Has staff answer
AF Nikkor 50mm f/1.8D
 
5 Answers

is the 50mm 1.8 autofocuse lens compatable with the D40?

Mar 20, 2011 by
by
littlered527
arizona
Has staff answer
0points
0out of 0found this question helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful0unhelpful0
 
Products related to my question
D40
4.6 out of 5(1,254)
 
 
 
 
 
3 years, 8 months ago by
by
littlered527
arizona
Location : 
arizona
Age: 25-34
Favorite Subject: Family & Friends
Nikon Family: 2-5 years
Experience: More than a year
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist
5 Answers

Answers

+1point
1out of 1found this answer helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful1unhelpful0
Answer: 
There isn't a simple answer to your question. If you take compatible to mean all D40 functions will work on the 50 mm f/1.8 D, then the answer is no. Specifically, the autofocus will not work. You can, however, use the electronic focus dot (should be in the lower left; check your manual) and manually rotate the focus ring. If you take compatible to mean can you mount it on the D40 and take pictures, then the answer is yes. You'll have P, S, A, and M modes and you can focus by hand. Since there is a CPU in the lens, you'll probably be able to meter through the lens (but check the D40's manual for Nikon's official position on this, as I don't shoot with a D40).
May 30, 2011 by
by
montanaShooter
annapolis, MD
Location : 
annapolis, MD
Age: 55-65
Favorite Subject: Landscape
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: 3-6 months
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist

0points
0out of 0found this answer helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful0unhelpful0
Answer: 
No, the autofocus feature will not work with the D40 (or the D60). However, you can still use the lens on the D40, but you have to do manual focus.
Apr 16, 2011 by
by
Anonymous

-1point
0out of 1found this answer helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful0unhelpful1
Answer: 
Nope. AFS lenses only for autofocus. Great lens, but sorry, you are out of luck.
Apr 14, 2011 by
by
RD

0points
0out of 0found this answer helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful0unhelpful0
Answer: 
It will work but not well because you will lose autofocus capability and I don't believe it will meter. The camera body has to have the screwtype af motor built into it.
Apr 14, 2011 by
by
Whispers
Ontario, Canada
Location : 
Ontario, Canada
Age: 25-34
Favorite Subject: Nature
Nikon Family: 2-5 years
Experience: More than a year
Role: Semi-professional photographer

+1point
1out of 1found this answer helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful1unhelpful0
Answer: 
Nikon offers two types of autofocus digital camera bodies: those with a built-in focus drive motor and those which require a lens to have a motor. Cameras such as the D40 do not have a focus motor in it so they require the lens to have the focusing motor – an “AF-S” lens. While these bodies can use a lens with no focus motor (an “AF” lens) you would have to manually turn the focus ring to bring the subject in to sharp focus.

You may want to try the AF-S version of this lens.
 
Products related to my answer
 
Mar 23, 2011 by
by
NikonStaff
1 person is following this questionFollow This Question
AF Nikkor 50mm f/1.8D
 
5 Answers

D3100 with Nikon 50mm f/1.8D AF

Oct 18, 2011 by
by
adi
NYC
+5points
6out of 7found this question helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful6unhelpful1
Hi ,
I just purchased Nikon 50mm f/1.8D AF and using it on my D3100...I bought this lens as it has large aperture ie 1.8 ...When i fixed the lens to my D3100 it said no lens set aperture to F22 and lock the aperture ring...So i did it..then i was not able to rotate the aperture ring to make it 1.8F...I was little worried but then i was able to change the aperture to F1.8 in the camera settings(D3100) in A priority mode. Everything was fine... Keeping the aperture at F1.8 i turned off the camera and opened the lens to check whether the aperture has really opened up completely.. But i found that it was small hole which is equal to F22..... Now my question is ... Does changing the aperture in D3100 really changing the aperture or its just shows at F1.8 on viewfinder but in reality its still F22. Why when i open the lens at F1.8 setting in D3100 the aperture hole is still small=F22 ?
When the lens is attached and the camera is on i cannot see/verify that aperture has really opened up..
I may sound wierd but i want to make sure i am really using F1.8 aperture on my D3100 with this D lens...Otherwise i would return and order the af-s g lens.
3 years, 2 months ago by
by
adi
NYC
Location : 
NYC
Age: 25-34
Favorite Subject: Portrait
Nikon Family: 0-1 years
Experience: 1-3 months
Role: Just getting started with photography
5 Answers

Answers

+1point
1out of 1found this answer helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful1unhelpful0
Answer: 
The aperture is f/22 when you take the camera off the lens because the aperture ring on the lens is set to f/22. However, when you have the lens attached to the D3100 and set to f/1.8, the photograph will be taken at f/1.8. When it comes to automatic cameras, the state of the 'aperture hole' when the lens is off the camera has absolutely no bearing on what the lens does when a photo is being taken. For example, the resting state of the G lenses is the maximum aperture when not connected to the lens #tiny hole#.

#this may confuse you [if it does, just pretend you didn't read it]# Another tidbit of info is that regardless of what you have the aperture set to, when you are looking through the viewfinder, the aperture is always as wide as the lens can go--it only closes to, say, f/11 for the period of time that the photo is being taken.

Also, a great way to solve a problem like this by yourself would be to take a picture with the aperture set at f/22 and one with the aperture set at f/1.8, and if there is a drastic difference between the two photographs, you can deduce that your camera is, in fact, controlling the aperture.
Apr 3, 2012 by
by
Anonymous

+1point
1out of 1found this answer helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful1unhelpful0
Answer: 
I read somewhere that there is not much difference between D&G..And D is compatible with non-nikon also..So i bought this lens..Is there any other noticeable benefit of G other than auto focus considering i m using D3100... I just got the lens today from amazon at 124$ ..Its not too late I can exchange it with G lens. It will cost 219$...Please suggest wisely..is it worth spending extra 100$...thanks..

Also if someone can suggest must have accessories/lens for a beginer of D3100?
Oct 18, 2011 by
by
adi
nyc
Location : 
nyc
Age: 25-34
Favorite Subject: Portrait
Nikon Family: 0-1 years
Experience: 1-3 months
Role: Just getting started with photography

0points
1out of 2found this answer helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful1unhelpful1
Answer: 
It should be at 1.8 if you manually set it. Take a picture, download it and your photo software will tell you at what aperture the picture was shot at. Why didn't you get the AF-S to begin with, better lens not much more money
Oct 18, 2011 by
by
JoeR

+1point
1out of 1found this answer helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful1unhelpful0
Answer: 
The mechanical aperture control ring is there on this lens to allow it to be backwards compatible with older mechanical Nikon film bodies. On your camera the aperture is controlled electronically by the body. On an entry level model like the D3100 there is no depth-of-field preview button to electronically stop-down the lens to the chosen aperture.
Oct 18, 2011 by
by
MichaelL

+2points
2out of 2found this answer helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful2unhelpful0
Answer: 
The camera body controls aperture not the lens, yes it will open it up to 1.8, you should be able to see this in the out of focus areas in your images.
Oct 18, 2011 by
by
KeithD
1 person is following this questionFollow This Question
Has staff answer
AF Nikkor 50mm f/1.8D
 
5 Answers

How do I auto focus with this lens on a D60?

Mar 3, 2011 by
by
JMerriken
Charlotte, NC
Has staff answer
+11points
14out of 17found this question helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful14unhelpful3
 
Products related to my question
D60
4.5 out of 5(58)
 
 
 
 
 
3 years, 9 months ago by
by
JMerriken
Charlotte, NC
5 Answers

Answers

+5points
5out of 5found this answer helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful5unhelpful0
Answer: 
Sorry, the D60 does not have the AF coupling mechanism the f/1.8 D needs. If you check page 146 of the D60 manual, you'll notice that the D60 can autofocus only with AF-S or AF-I lenses. Basically, it is an issue of where the AF motor is located: in the body or in the lens. The D-series lenses need the body to have the motor and the D60 doesn't have one. You can use the electronic rangefinder (see page 116 of the manual) to assist manual focusing this lens, but the D60 by itself will not autofocus with any of the D lenses.
May 30, 2011 by
by
MontanaShooter
Annapolis, MD
Location : 
Annapolis, MD
Age: 55-65
Favorite Subject: Landscape
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: 3-6 months
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist

+4points
5out of 6found this answer helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful5unhelpful1
Answer: 
The autofocus feature does not work on the D60. You have to use focus manually.
Apr 16, 2011 by
by
Anonymous

+1point
1out of 1found this answer helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful1unhelpful0
Answer: 
The D60 cannot AF with this lens. You can use any lens with (G) SWM (Silent Wave Motor) for AF.
 
Products related to my answer
 
Apr 14, 2011 by
by
MDCSF
San Francisco
Location : 
San Francisco
Age: 25-34
Favorite Subject: Nature
Nikon Family: 2-5 years
Experience: More than a year
Role: Semi-professional photographer

+3points
4out of 5found this answer helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful4unhelpful1
Answer: 
AF NIKKOR 50mm f/1.4D lens with Nikon D60 (D5000, D3100, D3000, D50, D40 or D40x) will works only in manual mode, because both lens and camera body does not have internal Auto Focus (AF) motor.
AF-S NIKKOR 50mm f/1.4G lens will support auto focus with D60 (D5000, D3100, D3000, D50, D40, D40x), because this lens have internal Exclusive Nikon Silent Wave Motor (SWM), enables fast, accurate, and quiet autofocus.

Goodluck
Mar 12, 2011 by
by
yevgen
Watertown, MA, 02472
Location : 
Watertown, MA, 02472
Age: 55-65
Favorite Subject: Sports
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: More than a year
Role: Professional photographer

0points
0out of 0found this answer helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful0unhelpful0
Answer: 
If you want to use this lens on a D60 you will have to achieve focus manually since the camera body doesn’t have the internal motor for AF.
Mar 9, 2011 by
by
NikonStaff
1 person is following this questionFollow This Question
Has staff answer
AF Nikkor 50mm f/1.8D
 
4 Answers

Nikon D5000

Mar 7, 2011 by
by
Manny
California
Has staff answer
+25points
26out of 27found this question helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful26unhelpful1
I know its a nikon Lens , i Just want to make sure it works on the Nikon D5000
3 years, 9 months ago by
by
Manny
California
Location : 
California
Age: 18-24
Favorite Subject: Nature
Nikon Family: 0-1 years
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist
4 Answers

Answers

+11points
11out of 11found this answer helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful11unhelpful0
Answer: 
Sorry, no autofocus motor on the D5000 - you need AFS lenses (with their own motors). Other than autofocus the other functions will work fine; you have to stick to AFS lenses for autofocus on the D5000. Great lens if you don't mind manually focusing your shots.

+4points
4out of 4found this answer helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful4unhelpful0
Answer: 
The Nikon 50mm f/1.8D will work with you camera but you will have to manual focus. In order for the AF to work you will need to look at lens with (G) with SWM (Silent Wave Motor).
 
Products related to my answer
 
Apr 14, 2011 by
by
MDCSF
San Francisco
Location : 
San Francisco
Age: 25-34
Favorite Subject: Nature
Nikon Family: 2-5 years
Experience: More than a year
Role: Semi-professional photographer

+7points
8out of 9found this answer helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful8unhelpful1
Answer: 
AF NIKKOR 50mm f/1.4D will works with Nikon D5000 only in manual focus mode, because this lens needs internal AF motor in the camera body, which D5000 does not have.
But if you need 50mm 1.4 Nikon lens with auto focus for D5000, you can use AF-S NIKKOR 50mm f/1.4G, which have internal Silent Wave Motor (SWM) and better resolution than AF NIKKOR 50mm f/1.4D.

Goodluck
Mar 11, 2011 by
by
Yevgen
Watertown, MA, 02472
Location : 
Watertown, MA, 02472
Age: 55-65
Favorite Subject: Sports
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: More than a year
Role: Professional photographer

+5points
5out of 5found this answer helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful5unhelpful0
Answer: 
If you want to use this lens on a D5000 you will have to achieve focus manually since the camera body doesn’t have the internal motor for AF.
Mar 10, 2011 by
by
NikonStaff
3 people are following this questionFollow This Question
Has staff answer
AF Nikkor 50mm f/1.8D
 
4 Answers

Is autofocus included for a D3000?

Mar 10, 2011 by
by
Anonymous
Has staff answer
+13points
14out of 15found this question helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful14unhelpful1
3 years, 9 months ago by
by
Anonymous
4 Answers

Answers

+1point
1out of 1found this answer helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful1unhelpful0
Answer: 
Sorry, no autofocus motor. You have to stick to AFS lenses.
Apr 14, 2011 by
by
RD

+1point
1out of 1found this answer helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful1unhelpful0
Answer: 
AF is not available with this lens (50mm f/1.8D) for you Camera D3000. You will need to use a lens with (G) Silent Wave Motor (SWM) for AF.
 
Products related to my answer
 
Apr 14, 2011 by
by
MDCSF
San Francisco
Location : 
San Francisco
Age: 25-34
Favorite Subject: Nature
Nikon Family: 2-5 years
Experience: More than a year
Role: Semi-professional photographer

+2points
4out of 6found this answer helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful4unhelpful2
Answer: 
If you need 50mm 1.4 Nikon lens with auto focus for D3000, you need AF-S NIKKOR 50mm f/1.4G, which have internal Silent Wave Motor (SWM).
Mar 11, 2011 by
by
Yevgen
Watertown, MA, 02472
Location : 
Watertown, MA, 02472
Age: 55-65
Favorite Subject: Sports
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: More than a year
Role: Professional photographer

+8points
8out of 8found this answer helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful8unhelpful0
Answer: 
Nikon offers two types of autofocus digital camera bodies: those with a built-in focus drive motor and those which require a lens to have a motor. Camera’s such as the D3000 do not have a focus motor in it and can be smaller and lighter but they require the lens to have the focusing motor – an “AF-S” lens. While these bodies can use a lens with no focus motor (an “AF” lens) you would have to manually turn the focus ring to bring the subject in to sharp focus.
 
Products related to my answer
 
Mar 11, 2011 by
by
NikonStaff
1 person is following this questionFollow This Question
Has staff answer
AF Nikkor 50mm f/1.8D
 
4 Answers

Will this lens work with a Nikon D90?

Apr 15, 2011 by
by
Anonymous
Has staff answer
+4points
4out of 4found this question helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful4unhelpful0
3 years, 8 months ago by
by
Anonymous
4 Answers

Answers

+2points
4out of 6found this answer helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful4unhelpful2
Answer: 
The D90 specifications state that it supports all G and D AF lenses, so there shouldn't be any problems with a Nikkor f/1.8 D AF lens. If you want to be really careful you could rent one (or borrow one from an understanding friend) for a day and test it out.
May 30, 2011 by
by
MontanaShooter
Annapolis, MD
Location : 
Annapolis, MD
Age: 55-65
Favorite Subject: Landscape
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: 3-6 months
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist

+2points
2out of 2found this answer helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful2unhelpful0
Answer: 
Yes, it is compatible with the D90.
Apr 16, 2011 by
by
Anonymous

+9points
9out of 9found this answer helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful9unhelpful0
Answer: 
Yes. Nikon 50mm f/1.8D fully compatible with Nikon D90. All you need to do is move your aperture ring to f/22 and push the lock switch (orange switch).
Apr 15, 2011 by
by
Nino N.
Stevens Point, WI
Location : 
Stevens Point, WI
Age: 18-24
Favorite Subject: Portrait
Nikon Family: 2-5 years
Experience: More than a year
Role: Semi-professional photographer

+5points
5out of 5found this answer helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful5unhelpful0
Answer: 
Yes, you can use this lens with the D90.
Apr 15, 2011 by
by
NikonStaff
1 person is following this questionFollow This Question
0points
0out of 0found this question helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful0unhelpful0
2 years, 3 months ago by
by
Olivia
New Zealand
Location : 
New Zealand
Age: 18-24
Favorite Subject: Travel
Nikon Family: 0-1 years
Experience: Less than a month
Role: Occasional user, memory keeper
4 Answers

Answers

+1point
1out of 1found this answer helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful1unhelpful0
Answer: 
This lens working only in manual mode with Nikon D320 because you can use only lenses with built in motor to perform autofocus hense the Nikon D320 doesn't have internal motor
Aug 26, 2012 by
by
Nabfro
Egypt
Location : 
Egypt
Age: 55-65
Favorite Subject: Nature
Nikon Family: 11-20 years
Experience: Less than a month
Role: Semi-professional photographer

+2points
3out of 4found this answer helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful3unhelpful1
Answer: 
Unfortunately, your D3000 lacks the 'focusing screwdriver' that will autofocus the AF Nikkor 50mm f/1.8 lens. This lens requires that the camera has a motor in it to autofocus.

The only lenses that will autofocus on the D3000 are the ones that have AF-S in the title. The AF-S NIKKOR 50mm f/1.4G is the closest match to the one you bought that will autofocus on the D3000 body. AF-S means the lens has its own internal focusing motor.
Aug 26, 2012 by
by
Arkayem
Savannah, GA, USA
Location : 
Savannah, GA, USA
Age: 55-65
Favorite Subject: Portrait
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: More than a year
Role: Professional photographer

+1point
1out of 1found this answer helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful1unhelpful0
Answer: 
the af d lens will not autofocus on this camera. uneed the afs g lens to autofocus on your camera.
Aug 26, 2012 by
by
Anonymous
Age: 45-54
Favorite Subject: Portrait
Nikon Family: 2-5 years
Experience: More than a year
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist

+1point
1out of 1found this answer helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful1unhelpful0
Answer: 
It will not af on the D3200 as the camera has no built focus motor, the only 50mm that will af is the newer AF-s version and not the AF-d.
Aug 26, 2012 by
by
KeithD
1 person is following this questionFollow This Question
Has staff answer
AF Nikkor 50mm f/1.8D
 
3 Answers

What settings do I use on a D90 to get a clear subject and blurred background taking a portrait shot using this lense?

Mar 3, 2011 by
by
Cupcake
Mississippi
Has staff answer
+6points
8out of 10found this question helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful8unhelpful2
 
Products related to my question
 
3 years, 9 months ago by
by
Cupcake
Mississippi
Location : 
Mississippi
Age: 25-34
Favorite Subject: Portrait
Nikon Family: 2-5 years
Experience: Less than a month
Role: Occasional user, memory keeper
3 Answers

Answers

-1point
0out of 1found this answer helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful0unhelpful1
Answer: 
To get the bokeh (blurred background) use the lower f number in apeture priority. IE f1.4 as you increase the f# your background becomes clearer...
Mar 28, 2011 by
by
Dog Photog
Columbus, OH
Location : 
Columbus, OH
Age: 45-54
Favorite Subject: Portrait
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: More than 20 years
Role: Professional photographer

+5points
5out of 5found this answer helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful5unhelpful0
Answer: 
With Nikon D90 you have 3 options:

#1 Select Advanced Scene Modes, Portrait (or Night Portrait, if you need detailed brightness of black background (night town);

#2 Select Aperture-Priority Auto (A) with aperture 1.8, 2.0 or 2.8 and Face-Priority AF

#3 Select Manual Mode with aperture 1.8, 2.0 or 2.8 and Face-Priority AF.

How will be clear subject and blurred background will depends from distance to the main subject and background (as far background from main subject as more blurred will be background), but you can play with aperture and find what you really need:

1.8 will give you small depth field of the main subject and the most blurred background;

2.8 will give you bigger depth field of the main subject and still blurred background;

4.0 and 5.6 will make all main subject in focus and blurred background, if it is very far away.

Goodluck
Mar 12, 2011 by
by
Yevgen
Watertown, MA, 02472
Location : 
Watertown, MA, 02472
Age: 55-65
Favorite Subject: Portrait
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: More than a year
Role: Professional photographer

+2points
2out of 2found this answer helpful.
Was this helpful?helpful2unhelpful0
Answer: 
Please see link below for more information on Depth of Field:

Answer Title: What is Depth of Field?
Answer Link: http://support.nikonusa.com/app/ans...
Mar 9, 2011 by
by
NikonStaff
2 people are following this questionFollow This Question
Page: 2 3 4 5
next>>
Page: 2 3 4 5
next>>

Product Registration

Registering your Nikon product allows us to send you (with your permission) important updates, service information and helpful hints, and it makes it easier should you ever need to call in for help.
Register your product online now.

Nikon Answers Site

We store all resolved problems in our solution database. If you can’t find a relevant answer, feel free to submit a question to our technical support team.
View Questions & Answers