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Affordable, fast f/1.8 prime lens with manual aperture control.

Offering natural image rendering and exceptional sharpness, the AF NIKKOR 50mm f/1.8D is a versatile, affordable prime lens. Extremely compact and lightweight—it weighs approximately 5.5 oz (155 g)— making it a convenient carry-around lens for nearly any shooting opportunity. Its aperture control ring enables smooth manual adjustments during Live View shooting, making it a great video partner, too.
Super Integrated Coating

The precision of a prime lens

Natural, exceptionally sharp images

The AF NIKKOR 50mm f/1.8D is as versatile as it is compact—perfect for travel, portraits and general photography. Its fast f/1.8 maxium aperture creates an attractive natural background blur (bokeh) and enables great low-light shooting. Produce consistently stunning visuals, indoors or out.

Performance in any light

Fast enough for low-light shooting

The AF NIKKOR 50mm f/1.8D is fast enough for shooting in most lighting situations without a flash—from dusk and dawn to dim indoor lighting. Its aperture control ring allows for manual adjustments during Live View shooting. Broaden your shooting opportunities.
Super Integrated Coating
Super Integrated Coating
Nikon Super Integrated Coating is Nikon's term for its multilayer coating of the optical elements in NIKKOR lenses.
AF Nikkor 50mm f/1.8D 4.7 5 157 157
This is a great lens for portraits. I also like to use extention tubes with it for some real close up work. June 7, 2011
Great Lens but must be manual focused on d3100 Great lens for low light situations. Lock 22 and the camera will perform all functions except Auto Focus. Lens must be manually focused on the D3100, D5100 cameras and any others that requires AF-S lenses. Great for low light situations. Can even take pictures with only candlelight and with shutter speeds sufficient to hand hold the camera. June 4, 2011
Wonderful lens!! I've only had this lens for a few hours now, but I'm already in love with it!! It takes beautiful pictures! I just wish that I would have made this purchase a long time ago! May 31, 2011
No camera bag should be without one. This lens is very sharp and performs well in low light conditions. It has a nice bokeh (out of focus blur). It is full frame, as opposed to DX only, which is nice as I still occasionally use 35 mm film (normally I shoot with a D7000). Even better it has an infrared focus marking, taking the guess work out when I shoot IR film. Those of us who grew up using film appreciate the focus scale and the depth-of-focus scales. It takes a 52 mm filter, which is means I don't have to acquire a new set of filters just for it. Without doing side-by-side testing, it seems like by 55 mm AI Nikkor (macro) is a tad sharper. On the other hand, the 55 is AI, not AF, and my eyes are not as good as they used to be, so having that quick autofocus is a good thing. A word warning, close in at wide aperture (2.8 through 1.8) the depth of field gets real small. You might want to practice a bit before you need to shoot wide open in order to get a feel for what your depth-of-field is going to be. Bottom line, use this lens correctly and it will reward you with sharp subject focus and beautiful out-of-focus backgrounds. May 30, 2011
My Favorite Lens This lens is extremely sharp. I use it for most of my shooting, primarily portraits of people along with my D-700. The bokah is extremely beautiful when wide open. The price cannot be beat. I don't feel a need for the F1.4 when I use this because of the high ISO of the D-700. I have attached a sample shot. May 29, 2011
must have should be the new kit lens This is the lens that should come with camera bodies. It's fast, sharp and feather lite. Being a prime it really helps bring out your create perspective. Must have for portraits and if you have small children you will love its speed. I almost forgot this lens has no focus motor, meaning if you have an entry level body auto focus in not possible. however for the price and ease of manual focusing you will not be disappointed. May 22, 2011
Great lens!! I am new to DSLR.. I have purchased other point and shoot cameras that just didn't cut it indoors. I purchased this lens for my D3100 and haven't regretted it... I can take pictures in the dark that turn out fantastic!! And I am not an expert by any means. The only downside is the manual focus on the D3100.. So I just have to switch back to the kit lens (auto-focus) from time to time when taking pictures of children at play... May 20, 2011
Don't waist money on 1.4, 50mm! If you want fast go with 1.2, 50mm manual focus, it is a beautiful lens. 1.8, 50mm is all you need. Do not buy Nikon Bodies that do not have internal Focus motor! Maybe Nikon will get smart and make all of their bodies with internal focus motors! May 13, 2011
Good lens for the price. The 50mm f/1.8D lens is a very good lens for the price. Good fast lens that produces sharp pictures and great color and contrast. Since it is a fast lens, I'm able to take pictures in low light that I wouldn't be able to do with a slower lens. May 7, 2011
Great lens for the money or a lot more I bought this as a tack sharp portrait and macro lens it works great for both. Very sharp pictures with this lens. lens has gotten me some great results. I am thinking about a super wide angle lens next. So far I have remained brand loyal on all lens purchases. April 29, 2011
Amzing lens This lens can produce amazing low light images as well as great portraits. I'm using it for headshot portraits in studio and outdoors and works fantastic. I do the zooming with my feet and the quality of the images is superb. I also purchased this lens for food photography in natural light (using daylight through windows and diffusers) and it opens up nicely to capture great shallow depth of field and sharpness. Its been on my D90 camera for 2 weeks straight and loving it. I use D90 primarily and D3000 as back up. This lens will work with the D3000 but only using manual focus. Also, the nice thing about using this prime lens versus a 18-55mm at full 55mm is that you don't get that barrel effect. April 28, 2011
super fast lens! I bought this lens a year an a half ago for my D60. I've focused manually and with steady hands picture was so sharp. The D60 has no motor on the body so, it was a little tough. But love it love it love it. Now, I upgraded to D90 and boy, auto focus was so fast. Super clear and sharp photos. I highly recommend this. I'm looking into getting a wide angle lens soon. Love Nikon! April 21, 2011
On a crop camera it is a decent portraitist, on a full-frame will be an all-around. And absolutely best value for your money anyway! April 18, 2011
Compact, lightweight end fast focusing, this lens has a nice wide aperture making it perfect for indoor shooting. Its other big advantage is that, on my DX format camera, it becomes a 75 MM portrait lines. April 16, 2011
Must have for all kinds of photogaphy Used maily for portraits at wedding, sharp, clear even at wid open. Reliable auto focus. Good value. April 15, 2011
Very nice, fast, compact lens I bought this lens expecting it to be good, but its great. Very fast and convenient lens. I really like Nikon products but this lens just dotted the (i) in my book. For the amount of money you pay, you get ten fold in image capturing capabilities. I recommend this lens, worth every penny. Should be in every photographer's bag. April 15, 2011
Great lens! I would highly highly recommend this lens to anyone! on a budget or not it is spectacular! This lens is a very fun lens and is just fun to play around with. It is great for portraits and also great for just taking photos of nature or flowers. And since it is F1.8 it is also great for low light! You get a whole lot for what you pay for. I honestly don't think Nikon could have done a better job with this one! April 14, 2011
My first lens - my first love I got the 50mm 1.8D with my N80 before I switched to digital with a D90. Have collected some zooms over the years, but when I look at pics, my best pics are always from the 50mm prime. As a plus, the focal length is perfect for portraits on the smaller digital sensors (as opposed to full frame). Now I am resigned to the fact, that if I want good pics, keep the 50mm on. If I really, really want versatility or need to go wide or closer in, then, and only then, throw a zoom on. My N80 is catching dust, but the 50mm lives on! April 14, 2011
Best Value This is a very sharp lens. The large aperture really allows for creative control with depth of field and easier low light shooting. It is lightweight lens that focuses fast on my d80 and has a nice feel to the manual focus. I use it for portraits on my DX camera. I also use it for lower light nature shots and still life. It has very low distortions and nice color and contrast. It is a lens that belongs in every Nikon shooters bag. It takes up no room so no excuse (unless you already have a 50mm f1.4) it is just a great to have. April 14, 2011
Sharpness is amazing I love this lens the sharpness and amount of detail I can capture is just amazing. LOVE IT LOVE IT LOVE IT! April 14, 2011
wonderful Great lens as long as your willing to do the legwork. Excellent value for the price, lightweight. Perfect for traveling and shooting portraits, landscapes, close-ups. April 14, 2011
Fast, with control of depth of field I use the lens on both a F100 body and a D70 body. The reduced field of view on the digital body makes it a good short telephoto. But the best aspect for me is being able to use a shallow depth of field. The lens is also relatively inexpensive. I use it almost exclusively when taking photos of my grandchildren. When I was younger, all I had re lenses were fast primes, but now some of the zoom lenses are f5.6 at the tele position. The 50mm f1.8 is filling the need for a fast lens for me. April 14, 2011
AF NIKKOR 50mm f/1.8D I bought this sharp, excellent, fast and cheap prime for my DX D90 as mainly portrait and low light situation. It works on every recent Nikon DX or FX camera. Also distance scale is a nice feature to have. I love this lens and recommend this to anybody in photography using Nikon gears. April 14, 2011
Solid little light lens. Originally i had the 1.4 model that is lighter and built with less fluid movement. It was a nice beginner lense and I still have it and use it for my other Nikon. However when I purchased my 300s I went all out and made the effort for quality lenses with a good feel and movement. After I purchased my 1.8 I was so surprised at how the lense felt. Not just in my hand or in the camera, but when i was taking pictures and the controls. It was fluid and solid feel in the movement. Like the feeling you get when you close the door on a high-end auto. You know you are dealing with quality with this lens. The 1.4 model performed well enough, but because of the light materials it is build with, it does not have the quality movement the 1.8 does. The difference is not in the movement alone, the pictures were amazing and really surprised me in difference between the two lenses. I'm not a pro photographer, so I can't elaborate on all the spec and logic behind the difference. I can only say that I love (LOVE) this lens. It is a great combo with my Nikon 300s April 14, 2011
standard lens for a fixed/prime, lens, this is a good one to have. the bokeh is great and perfect for portraits. not great as a lens to keep on your camera, taking snap shots, because the length is too long, especially on a dx body. April 14, 2011
Great available light lens One evening I left a meeting and walked home via the Inner Harbor. I took photos of the water front and the boats without flash and I had a collection of fantastic photos. When I flew back home from St. Louis last year in Detroit the pilot pointed out a beautiful skyline and I photographed it and the people on the plane were amazed. As a result of owning this lens, I am looking to purchase the 35mm f/1.8 and the 85mm f/1.8 either later this year or next year. April 11, 2011
Beautiful Photos I got this lens a few weeks ago. I am amazed by how wonderful and elegant the photos produced by this lens is. And the price! WOW!!! March 31, 2011
Great Lens for the Money I have shot about 10 pictures with this lens and can tell already it is great! Color is excellent, Great in low light, excellent bokeh. A great portrait lens for DX cameras. March 28, 2011
Accute sharpness and outstanding beautiful Bokeh Not since the early 80's to 90's have I even peered thru a 50mm and that was a Korean made pentax mount from the film days.Today I received my Nikkor 50mm f/1.8D for my now discontinued but very good D5000. I am amazed at the sharpness and true to life angle this lens provides, and the delicious creamy bokeh. I researched the 1.4 vs 1.8 for 2 solid days and chose the 1.8 mainly because it was hitting close to 2/3rds less the cost of the 1.4.. I could not justify the small amount of light gathering capability for basically the same lens. Now maybe as my skills and I grow in photography I may find myself needing and wanting thatr little bit extra out of the 1.4, but for now this is good for me. My reason for this purchase was for my fathers wedding that he requested me to shoot, although I have never done a wedding... gotta start somewhere... However after test popping off a few I know this lens will do me and my father justice as it is a superb portrait lens and the bokeh once again is the best I have seen so far. The ability to get up close will also lend this lens a bravo for artsy type ideas, landscape, and low light, I think I like it already better than my 35mm AF-S f/1.8. I can see after firing off less than 20 photos that theres always going to be plenty of work for this little baby. I have a feeling I will be reaching for this classic frequently. March 25, 2011
It stays on my D3100 Manual focus on my D3100 no problem. I am getting some awesome shots with lens. If I am shooting running kids I will go back to the kit lens for a few hours.. But I now leave this lens on the camera.. March 13, 2011
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AF Nikkor 50mm f/1.8D
 
7 Answers

I recently purchased the Nikor 50mm f/1.8 lens. Why am I unable to shoot in all modes, using settings other than aperature at 1.8?

Mar 22, 2011 by
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Trina
Southeast Michigan
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25out of 31found this question helpful.
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I've noticed a blinking FEE on my screen.
3 years, 5 months ago by
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Trina
Southeast Michigan
Location : 
Southeast Michigan
Age: 45-54
Favorite Subject: Portrait
Nikon Family: 0-1 years
Experience: 1-3 months
Role: Just getting started with photography
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+4points
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Answer: 
you need to set the aperture ring to the largest number which i thin is 22. if u dont have at least a d 90. this lens will not autofocus.. d 5200 and down wil be manual focus only.

+4points
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Answer: 
Turn the aperture ring on the lens to f/22 and move the lock switch (orange color) so the ring won't turn by accident.
Apr 15, 2011 by
by
Nino N.
Stevens Point, WI
Location : 
Stevens Point, WI
Age: 18-24
Favorite Subject: Portrait
Nikon Family: 2-5 years
Experience: More than a year
Role: Semi-professional photographer

+6points
6out of 6found this answer helpful.
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Answer: 
Have you moved the aperture ring to 22 and locked the orange switch (near the 2.8 mark) to allow camera adjustment of the aperture?

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Answer: 
that's becasue you don't have the aperture ring set for auto exposure control. I had the same problem and I noticed the ring was not set where the orange mark was in the auto position. Play with that.
Apr 14, 2011 by
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mike4mula
San Diego
Location : 
San Diego
Age: 55-65
Favorite Subject: Travel
Nikon Family: 2-5 years
Experience: 6-12 months
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist

+1point
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Answer: 
It's been awhile since I play with this lens but check to make sure the F/Stop Ring lock is set to the opposite of whatever you have it at currently. You should see a little latch that pushes up to unlock and down to the orange mark to lock. Good luck and hope that works.
 
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Apr 14, 2011 by
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MDCSF
San Francisco
Location : 
San Francisco
Age: 25-34
Favorite Subject: Nature
Nikon Family: 2-5 years
Experience: More than a year
Role: Semi-professional photographer

-1point
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Answer: 
Make sure that you set the lens itself to its smallest opening when you mount it on the camera.
Apr 11, 2011 by
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PhotoDeacon
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: More than a year
Role: Semi-professional photographer

-2points
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Answer: 
FEE means that the lens aperture ring is not set to minimum aperture. You need to set the ring to minimum aperture (largest f-number).
Mar 24, 2011 by
by
NikonStaff
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AF Nikkor 50mm f/1.8D
 
6 Answers

Will this lens autofocus on a Nikon D7000?

Mar 10, 2011 by
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Renee487
Sydney
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3 years, 5 months ago by
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Renee487
Sydney
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Answer: 
Yes, it works on my D7000
Jun 11, 2014 by
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Answer: 
Yes. It will do so quickly and quietly. My experience is that it will also do it accurately (but I've not run any precise tests). Follow the D7000 manual's instructions for AF and lens changes and you shouldn't have any problems. My D7000 and f/1.8 D lens combination autofocuses better and more rapidly than any of my kit lenses.
May 30, 2011 by
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montanaShooter
annapolis, MD
Location : 
annapolis, MD
Age: 55-65
Favorite Subject: Landscape
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: 3-6 months
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist

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Answer: 
Absolutely. Great lens, I use it on my D90 without a problem and with great results. It is a standard D type lens. All D7000 camera functions are supported with D type and G type lenses.

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Answer: 
Yes.
See Compatible Lenses for your D7000:
AF-NIKKOR for F3AF not supported
AI-P NIKKOR: All functions supported except 3D color matrix metering II
DX AF NIKKOR: All functions possible
Electronic rangefinder can be used if maximum aperture is f/5.6 or faster
IX Nikkor lenses cannot be used
Non-CPU: Can be used in modes A and M; color matrix metering and aperture value display supported if user provides lens data (AI lenses only)
Other AF NIKKOR: All functions supported except 3D color matrix metering II
PC Micro-NIKKOR does not support some functions
Type G or D AF NIKKOR: All functions supported
Apr 14, 2011 by
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MDCSF
San Francisco
Location : 
San Francisco
Age: 25-34
Favorite Subject: Nature
Nikon Family: 2-5 years
Experience: More than a year
Role: Semi-professional photographer

+6points
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Answer: 
This lens will autofocus on Nikon 7000, because Nikon 7000 have internal AF motor.
Mar 11, 2011 by
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Yevgen
Watertown, MA, 02472
Location : 
Watertown, MA, 02472
Age: 55-65
Favorite Subject: Sports
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: More than a year
Role: Professional photographer

+4points
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Answer: 
Yes. I own the D7000, and it performs perfectly as expected.
Mar 10, 2011 by
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Dodd
Provo, UT
Location : 
Provo, UT
Age: 55-65
Favorite Subject: Portrait
Nikon Family: 11-20 years
Experience: Less than a month
Role: Semi-professional photographer
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Has staff answer
AF Nikkor 50mm f/1.8D
 
5 Answers

How do I auto focus with this lens on a D60?

Mar 3, 2011 by
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JMerriken
Charlotte, NC
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4.5 out of 5(58)
 
 
 
 
 
3 years, 5 months ago by
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JMerriken
Charlotte, NC
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Answer: 
Sorry, the D60 does not have the AF coupling mechanism the f/1.8 D needs. If you check page 146 of the D60 manual, you'll notice that the D60 can autofocus only with AF-S or AF-I lenses. Basically, it is an issue of where the AF motor is located: in the body or in the lens. The D-series lenses need the body to have the motor and the D60 doesn't have one. You can use the electronic rangefinder (see page 116 of the manual) to assist manual focusing this lens, but the D60 by itself will not autofocus with any of the D lenses.
May 30, 2011 by
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MontanaShooter
Annapolis, MD
Location : 
Annapolis, MD
Age: 55-65
Favorite Subject: Landscape
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: 3-6 months
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist

+4points
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Answer: 
The autofocus feature does not work on the D60. You have to use focus manually.
Apr 16, 2011 by
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Anonymous

+1point
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Answer: 
The D60 cannot AF with this lens. You can use any lens with (G) SWM (Silent Wave Motor) for AF.
 
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Apr 14, 2011 by
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MDCSF
San Francisco
Location : 
San Francisco
Age: 25-34
Favorite Subject: Nature
Nikon Family: 2-5 years
Experience: More than a year
Role: Semi-professional photographer

+3points
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Answer: 
AF NIKKOR 50mm f/1.4D lens with Nikon D60 (D5000, D3100, D3000, D50, D40 or D40x) will works only in manual mode, because both lens and camera body does not have internal Auto Focus (AF) motor.
AF-S NIKKOR 50mm f/1.4G lens will support auto focus with D60 (D5000, D3100, D3000, D50, D40, D40x), because this lens have internal Exclusive Nikon Silent Wave Motor (SWM), enables fast, accurate, and quiet autofocus.

Goodluck
Mar 12, 2011 by
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yevgen
Watertown, MA, 02472
Location : 
Watertown, MA, 02472
Age: 55-65
Favorite Subject: Sports
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: More than a year
Role: Professional photographer

0points
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Answer: 
If you want to use this lens on a D60 you will have to achieve focus manually since the camera body doesn’t have the internal motor for AF.
Mar 9, 2011 by
by
NikonStaff
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AF Nikkor 50mm f/1.8D
 
5 Answers

is the 50mm 1.8 autofocuse lens compatable with the D40?

Mar 20, 2011 by
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littlered527
arizona
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4.6 out of 5(1,254)
 
 
 
 
 
3 years, 5 months ago by
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littlered527
arizona
Location : 
arizona
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Favorite Subject: Family & Friends
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Experience: More than a year
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist
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Answer: 
There isn't a simple answer to your question. If you take compatible to mean all D40 functions will work on the 50 mm f/1.8 D, then the answer is no. Specifically, the autofocus will not work. You can, however, use the electronic focus dot (should be in the lower left; check your manual) and manually rotate the focus ring. If you take compatible to mean can you mount it on the D40 and take pictures, then the answer is yes. You'll have P, S, A, and M modes and you can focus by hand. Since there is a CPU in the lens, you'll probably be able to meter through the lens (but check the D40's manual for Nikon's official position on this, as I don't shoot with a D40).
May 30, 2011 by
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montanaShooter
annapolis, MD
Location : 
annapolis, MD
Age: 55-65
Favorite Subject: Landscape
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: 3-6 months
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist

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Answer: 
No, the autofocus feature will not work with the D40 (or the D60). However, you can still use the lens on the D40, but you have to do manual focus.
Apr 16, 2011 by
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Anonymous

-1point
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Answer: 
Nope. AFS lenses only for autofocus. Great lens, but sorry, you are out of luck.
Apr 14, 2011 by
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RD

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Answer: 
It will work but not well because you will lose autofocus capability and I don't believe it will meter. The camera body has to have the screwtype af motor built into it.
Apr 14, 2011 by
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Whispers
Ontario, Canada
Location : 
Ontario, Canada
Age: 25-34
Favorite Subject: Nature
Nikon Family: 2-5 years
Experience: More than a year
Role: Semi-professional photographer

+1point
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Answer: 
Nikon offers two types of autofocus digital camera bodies: those with a built-in focus drive motor and those which require a lens to have a motor. Cameras such as the D40 do not have a focus motor in it so they require the lens to have the focusing motor – an “AF-S” lens. While these bodies can use a lens with no focus motor (an “AF” lens) you would have to manually turn the focus ring to bring the subject in to sharp focus.

You may want to try the AF-S version of this lens.
 
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Mar 23, 2011 by
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AF Nikkor 50mm f/1.8D
 
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D3100 with Nikon 50mm f/1.8D AF

Oct 18, 2011 by
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adi
NYC
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Hi ,
I just purchased Nikon 50mm f/1.8D AF and using it on my D3100...I bought this lens as it has large aperture ie 1.8 ...When i fixed the lens to my D3100 it said no lens set aperture to F22 and lock the aperture ring...So i did it..then i was not able to rotate the aperture ring to make it 1.8F...I was little worried but then i was able to change the aperture to F1.8 in the camera settings(D3100) in A priority mode. Everything was fine... Keeping the aperture at F1.8 i turned off the camera and opened the lens to check whether the aperture has really opened up completely.. But i found that it was small hole which is equal to F22..... Now my question is ... Does changing the aperture in D3100 really changing the aperture or its just shows at F1.8 on viewfinder but in reality its still F22. Why when i open the lens at F1.8 setting in D3100 the aperture hole is still small=F22 ?
When the lens is attached and the camera is on i cannot see/verify that aperture has really opened up..
I may sound wierd but i want to make sure i am really using F1.8 aperture on my D3100 with this D lens...Otherwise i would return and order the af-s g lens.
2 years, 10 months ago by
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adi
NYC
Location : 
NYC
Age: 25-34
Favorite Subject: Portrait
Nikon Family: 0-1 years
Experience: 1-3 months
Role: Just getting started with photography
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+1point
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Answer: 
The aperture is f/22 when you take the camera off the lens because the aperture ring on the lens is set to f/22. However, when you have the lens attached to the D3100 and set to f/1.8, the photograph will be taken at f/1.8. When it comes to automatic cameras, the state of the 'aperture hole' when the lens is off the camera has absolutely no bearing on what the lens does when a photo is being taken. For example, the resting state of the G lenses is the maximum aperture when not connected to the lens #tiny hole#.

#this may confuse you [if it does, just pretend you didn't read it]# Another tidbit of info is that regardless of what you have the aperture set to, when you are looking through the viewfinder, the aperture is always as wide as the lens can go--it only closes to, say, f/11 for the period of time that the photo is being taken.

Also, a great way to solve a problem like this by yourself would be to take a picture with the aperture set at f/22 and one with the aperture set at f/1.8, and if there is a drastic difference between the two photographs, you can deduce that your camera is, in fact, controlling the aperture.
Apr 3, 2012 by
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Anonymous

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Answer: 
I read somewhere that there is not much difference between D&G..And D is compatible with non-nikon also..So i bought this lens..Is there any other noticeable benefit of G other than auto focus considering i m using D3100... I just got the lens today from amazon at 124$ ..Its not too late I can exchange it with G lens. It will cost 219$...Please suggest wisely..is it worth spending extra 100$...thanks..

Also if someone can suggest must have accessories/lens for a beginer of D3100?
Oct 18, 2011 by
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adi
nyc
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Role: Just getting started with photography

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Answer: 
It should be at 1.8 if you manually set it. Take a picture, download it and your photo software will tell you at what aperture the picture was shot at. Why didn't you get the AF-S to begin with, better lens not much more money
Oct 18, 2011 by
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JoeR

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Answer: 
The mechanical aperture control ring is there on this lens to allow it to be backwards compatible with older mechanical Nikon film bodies. On your camera the aperture is controlled electronically by the body. On an entry level model like the D3100 there is no depth-of-field preview button to electronically stop-down the lens to the chosen aperture.
Oct 18, 2011 by
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MichaelL

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Answer: 
The camera body controls aperture not the lens, yes it will open it up to 1.8, you should be able to see this in the out of focus areas in your images.
Oct 18, 2011 by
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KeithD
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Nikon D5000

Mar 7, 2011 by
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Manny
California
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I know its a nikon Lens , i Just want to make sure it works on the Nikon D5000
3 years, 5 months ago by
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Answer: 
Sorry, no autofocus motor on the D5000 - you need AFS lenses (with their own motors). Other than autofocus the other functions will work fine; you have to stick to AFS lenses for autofocus on the D5000. Great lens if you don't mind manually focusing your shots.

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Answer: 
The Nikon 50mm f/1.8D will work with you camera but you will have to manual focus. In order for the AF to work you will need to look at lens with (G) with SWM (Silent Wave Motor).
 
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Apr 14, 2011 by
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MDCSF
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Answer: 
AF NIKKOR 50mm f/1.4D will works with Nikon D5000 only in manual focus mode, because this lens needs internal AF motor in the camera body, which D5000 does not have.
But if you need 50mm 1.4 Nikon lens with auto focus for D5000, you can use AF-S NIKKOR 50mm f/1.4G, which have internal Silent Wave Motor (SWM) and better resolution than AF NIKKOR 50mm f/1.4D.

Goodluck
Mar 11, 2011 by
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Yevgen
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Answer: 
If you want to use this lens on a D5000 you will have to achieve focus manually since the camera body doesn’t have the internal motor for AF.
Mar 10, 2011 by
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NikonStaff
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Is autofocus included for a D3000?

Mar 10, 2011 by
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Anonymous
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Answer: 
Sorry, no autofocus motor. You have to stick to AFS lenses.
Apr 14, 2011 by
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RD

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Answer: 
AF is not available with this lens (50mm f/1.8D) for you Camera D3000. You will need to use a lens with (G) Silent Wave Motor (SWM) for AF.
 
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Apr 14, 2011 by
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MDCSF
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Answer: 
If you need 50mm 1.4 Nikon lens with auto focus for D3000, you need AF-S NIKKOR 50mm f/1.4G, which have internal Silent Wave Motor (SWM).
Mar 11, 2011 by
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Yevgen
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Answer: 
Nikon offers two types of autofocus digital camera bodies: those with a built-in focus drive motor and those which require a lens to have a motor. Camera’s such as the D3000 do not have a focus motor in it and can be smaller and lighter but they require the lens to have the focusing motor – an “AF-S” lens. While these bodies can use a lens with no focus motor (an “AF” lens) you would have to manually turn the focus ring to bring the subject in to sharp focus.
 
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Mar 11, 2011 by
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Will this lens work with a Nikon D90?

Apr 15, 2011 by
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Anonymous
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Answer: 
The D90 specifications state that it supports all G and D AF lenses, so there shouldn't be any problems with a Nikkor f/1.8 D AF lens. If you want to be really careful you could rent one (or borrow one from an understanding friend) for a day and test it out.
May 30, 2011 by
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MontanaShooter
Annapolis, MD
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Answer: 
Yes, it is compatible with the D90.
Apr 16, 2011 by
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Anonymous

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Answer: 
Yes. Nikon 50mm f/1.8D fully compatible with Nikon D90. All you need to do is move your aperture ring to f/22 and push the lock switch (orange switch).
Apr 15, 2011 by
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Nino N.
Stevens Point, WI
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Answer: 
Yes, you can use this lens with the D90.
Apr 15, 2011 by
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2 years ago
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Olivia
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Answer: 
This lens working only in manual mode with Nikon D320 because you can use only lenses with built in motor to perform autofocus hense the Nikon D320 doesn't have internal motor
Aug 26, 2012 by
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Nabfro
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Answer: 
Unfortunately, your D3000 lacks the 'focusing screwdriver' that will autofocus the AF Nikkor 50mm f/1.8 lens. This lens requires that the camera has a motor in it to autofocus.

The only lenses that will autofocus on the D3000 are the ones that have AF-S in the title. The AF-S NIKKOR 50mm f/1.4G is the closest match to the one you bought that will autofocus on the D3000 body. AF-S means the lens has its own internal focusing motor.
Aug 26, 2012 by
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Arkayem
Savannah, GA, USA
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Savannah, GA, USA
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Answer: 
the af d lens will not autofocus on this camera. uneed the afs g lens to autofocus on your camera.
Aug 26, 2012 by
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Anonymous
Age: 45-54
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Answer: 
It will not af on the D3200 as the camera has no built focus motor, the only 50mm that will af is the newer AF-s version and not the AF-d.
Aug 26, 2012 by
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KeithD
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What settings do I use on a D90 to get a clear subject and blurred background taking a portrait shot using this lense?

Mar 3, 2011 by
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Cupcake
Mississippi
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3 years, 5 months ago by
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Cupcake
Mississippi
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Answer: 
To get the bokeh (blurred background) use the lower f number in apeture priority. IE f1.4 as you increase the f# your background becomes clearer...
Mar 28, 2011 by
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Dog Photog
Columbus, OH
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Columbus, OH
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Answer: 
With Nikon D90 you have 3 options:

#1 Select Advanced Scene Modes, Portrait (or Night Portrait, if you need detailed brightness of black background (night town);

#2 Select Aperture-Priority Auto (A) with aperture 1.8, 2.0 or 2.8 and Face-Priority AF

#3 Select Manual Mode with aperture 1.8, 2.0 or 2.8 and Face-Priority AF.

How will be clear subject and blurred background will depends from distance to the main subject and background (as far background from main subject as more blurred will be background), but you can play with aperture and find what you really need:

1.8 will give you small depth field of the main subject and the most blurred background;

2.8 will give you bigger depth field of the main subject and still blurred background;

4.0 and 5.6 will make all main subject in focus and blurred background, if it is very far away.

Goodluck
Mar 12, 2011 by
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Yevgen
Watertown, MA, 02472
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Watertown, MA, 02472
Age: 55-65
Favorite Subject: Portrait
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: More than a year
Role: Professional photographer

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Answer: 
Please see link below for more information on Depth of Field:

Answer Title: What is Depth of Field?
Answer Link: http://support.nikonusa.com/app/ans...
Mar 9, 2011 by
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